0727: "Trade Expert"

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Re: "Trade Expert" discussion

Postby phlip » Wed Apr 14, 2010 7:32 am UTC

keiranhalcyon31 wrote:Every time you say "URI", I die a little. "BCE", too.

BCE I won't argue with... it's a non-solution to a questionable problem.

But what's your problem with URI? URLs are a subset of URIs. URIs are strings in a certain format that identify resources... URLs are URIs that contain information on how to actually get that resource (like the hostname in a HTTP URL). They're different things, which deserve different terms.

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enum ಠ_ಠ {°□°╰=1, °Д°╰, ಠ益ಠ╰};
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby keithc » Wed Apr 14, 2010 8:03 am UTC

RebeccaRGB wrote:Edit: BTW, MS-DOS did copy the < > | redirection characters and the . and .. directory entries from Unix. Why wouldn't they copy the / separator from Unix if they could have?


I don't think they had redirection in the first versions of MS-DOS that had directories. Not sure about . and .. though

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby sje46 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 8:37 am UTC

lancequagmire wrote:http://www.creedthoughts.gov.www\creedthoughts

Check it out.
I'm letting the mods know that this isn't a lame attempt to spam...this is the web address for Creed Bratton's blog, and yes, it isn't supposed to work.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby NorthLondon » Wed Apr 14, 2010 8:44 am UTC

This reminds me of a notorious incident on the BBC News here in the UK from about 3 or 4 years ago. A gentleman called Guy Goma, who had turned up at the BBC for a "data cleansing" job interview, was accidentally put live on air for a broadcast interview relating to the internet / downloading, as someone backstage had got him confused with the real IT expert, who was also called Guy.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Goma for the full story.

I wonder if this is what inspired Randall?

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Invertin » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:04 am UTC

Goddamnit how have I never noticed this before

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby the tree » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:05 am UTC

NorthLondon wrote:I wonder if this is what inspired Randall?
That's what I thought of before I'd finished reading the comic, the cool thing about that story was that he wound up getting interviewed on the BBC again to describe the experience, unfortunately no infinite loops ensued.
TheoGB wrote:However, broadcasters are always saying 'forward slash', which irritates the hell out of me. It's a SLASH, that's what it is: you don't have to clarify it with forward.
What people seem to forget is that outside of computers, there is no such thing as a backslash: it doesn't mean anything in terms of actual punctuation. It's just a strange character that somehow popped into existence for a reason nobody can quite remember. The most annoying is when people use backslashes in normal prose e.g. indicating a chose between this\that, which is just stupid.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby phlip » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:14 am UTC

the tree wrote:What people seem to forget is that outside of computers, there is no such thing as a backslash: it doesn't mean anything in terms of actual punctuation. It's just a strange character that somehow popped into existence for a reason nobody can quite remember. The most annoying is when people use backslashes in normal prose e.g. indicating a chose between this\that, which is just stupid.

I can accept a handwritten backslash... especially if it was written by a leftie. Just like I can accept the many completely different shapes of the handwritten ampersand.

Typed, on the other hand...

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Diadem » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:28 am UTC

memcginn wrote:Of the two slashes available, one leans backwards, but the other one is drawn from right to left (top to bottom), which is backwards to my reading direction.

lordatog wrote:I've gotta admit, the distinction between slashes and backslashes has always seemed completely backwards to me. Naturally, when writing a slash, you start at the top and go down. So... a regular slash starts at the top and goes backwards from there, while a backslash starts at the top and goes forward. So counterintuitive.

I don't understand this.

In the western world most people write from left to right with their right hand. Your script thus naturally slants towards the right. Also when you write letters together in a single script, as most people used to write in the past, and as kids are still taught how to write, then you start letters at the bottom. So you start a letter at the bottom left corner. Where the slash starts.

How can you see this as backwards?
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby TV4Fun » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:42 am UTC

I might add that I had at least one professor in college (who taught programming, as well) who thought that the / character was called a backslash.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Rilian » Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:00 am UTC

What's a uri? It's my friend's name....

Left is back, because it's where you came from, because you're writing from left to right. The backslash is leaning back/left.
And I'm -2.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby the tree » Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:21 am UTC

phlip wrote:
the tree wrote:What people seem to forget is that outside of computers, there is no such thing as a backslash: it doesn't mean anything in terms of actual punctuation. It's just a strange character that somehow popped into existence for a reason nobody can quite remember. The most annoying is when people use backslashes in normal prose e.g. indicating a chose between this\that, which is just stupid.

I can accept a handwritten backslash... especially if it was written by a leftie. Just like I can accept the many completely different shapes of the handwritten ampersand.

Typed, on the other hand...
Oh yeah I meant typed. On paper a slash is just a slash.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Rilian » Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:30 am UTC

phlip wrote:I can accept a handwritten backslash... especially if it was written by a leftie. ...


Erm. I'm left-handed and I write /. I don't see why handedness would affect it.
And I'm -2.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby jeff@orca.lu » Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:31 am UTC

BRAVO!!

Also, I've never - or maybe just once - heard anyone say backslash instead of a slash. I totally do not get why they would do that... I'll go with the "they think they're cool" one.

bookworm656 wrote:Yeeeeessssss!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It drives me crazy when people do that! I've been known to yell at the screen when I hear that and other errors. Newscasters are also bad about using "damages" when they mean "damage." (Either that, or tornadoes have started suing people instead of tearing apart their houses. You never know, these days...)

Yes, especially in America... xD

Also, I don't agree with Jorpho's POV. Although I respect them. Douchebag. haha no just kidding ;)

Akkhima wrote:I was working at a call center and sat near a guy who kept saying "frontslash" every time he would read out a URL. It drove me absolutely nuts.

haha xD nice one!

Steve the Pocket wrote:
Sunidesus wrote:The one that drives me absolutely insane is upload/download. Last fall after a couple weeks of the sports guy saying "extended highlights will be downloaded to the web" I finally got him to correct himself and he said it correctly the next week.

Hmm. Never heard that one before. I have heard people use the phrase "I got it off-line" to mean they got something from the Internet, though. There needs to be a term for when people accidentally use the antonym of the word they mean. I vote for "Januse", a portmanteau of "Janus [word]" and "[mis]use".

Wow, you mean the Roman deity Janus? I love those complex etymological word-games! I'm in; all in favour of Januse!
How do we fronounce it? I am for "Gen-use", the other alternative "Janus-(eh)" sounding just like... Janus xD

lordatog wrote:I've gotta admit, the distinction between slashes and backslashes has always seemed completely backwards to me. Naturally, when writing a slash, you start at the top and go down. So... a regular slash starts at the top and goes backwards from there, while a backslash starts at the top and goes forward. So counterintuitive.

When I write a slash I start at the bottom and go up... so that'd be forwards. I never considered anyone would write their forward-slashes backwards, but if you say you do... okay!^^

nico wrote:
So why is it that so many freakin' browsers will just tell you you're wrong if you type http:\\ instead of just doing the sensible thing and automatically interpreting it as http:// ?!


Because:
1) we don't really want to spread this disease even more
2) you can actually put a backslash in the name of a file. Changing it automagically to slash would not allow you to access that file anymore

PS: interestingly in Italy (where I'm from) people say "slash" (using the English word, I mean). Of course, because of the low level of English in the population nobody really knows what "slash" means, so I've seen people writing it wrong from time to time. But at least they say it correctly!
And, obviously, few people have a clue about what a backslash is, or that it exists at all :P


Okay...whay does slash mean? I always just thought of it as... as slash^^ , a '/' character, a reversed backslash:P Does it mean something *real*? Wait... I could find out myself ;)
Oh.... how brutal xD It means "cut (something) with a violent sweeping movement, typically using a knife or sword" (New Oxford American Dictionary on my Mac)

Also: Ah, sei d'Italia! Io imparo l'Italiano, ma non è molto bene ancora. ;)

Yes... I basically just quoted half the thread and commented on everything... yeah.

Greetings,

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby finlay » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:15 am UTC

I've never heard 'backslash' on UK television – when I was a child they used to say 'forward slash' in web addresses to make sure people got it right, actually. It made them slow to say any web addresses though – it was always something along the lines of www-dot-bbc-dot-co-dot-uk-forward slash-cbbc. But then they used to use the phrase 'click onto' to get to the individual shows' pages, and that used to annoy me greatly. (Or they'd say "click onto www.bbc.co.uk/cbbc" - either way it pissed me off. They probably still do this on normal non-children's TV, I just haven't watched any in months so have forgotten what they say.)

Nowadays if they bother to read out the address at all they just say 'slash', IIRC.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby uncivlengr » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:19 am UTC

Diadem wrote:
memcginn wrote:Of the two slashes available, one leans backwards, but the other one is drawn from right to left (top to bottom), which is backwards to my reading direction.

lordatog wrote:I've gotta admit, the distinction between slashes and backslashes has always seemed completely backwards to me. Naturally, when writing a slash, you start at the top and go down. So... a regular slash starts at the top and goes backwards from there, while a backslash starts at the top and goes forward. So counterintuitive.

I don't understand this.

In the western world most people write from left to right with their right hand. Your script thus naturally slants towards the right. Also when you write letters together in a single script, as most people used to write in the past, and as kids are still taught how to write, then you start letters at the bottom. So you start a letter at the bottom left corner. Where the slash starts.

How can you see this as backwards?
If you asked me which is the backslahs, I would make the same assumption as lordatog, because that's how you would write it.

A slash isn't going to be written in cursive letters... it's always a separate character. If you write "one/two" by hand, do you start the slash at the bottom?

A large majority of the population probably doesn't know which one is the "back" slash, though they know which one to use in a web address. Even if they don't, they're not using web addresses very much anyway and are going to waste at most three seconds a day correcting the mistake when they make it.

It's kind of like people confusing concrete and cement (except the difference between those things is much more significant). If some random person says one when they mean the other in everyday conversation, it doesn't make any difference. The only times it makes an actual difference, it's when they're used by people who already know the distinction and don't make that mistake.
Last edited by uncivlengr on Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:45 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby ZeroSkulleton » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:36 am UTC

I vote for Januse.


I januse, you januse, he/she/we januse. Janused. Janusing. Janusology, the study of januse.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Diadem » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:42 am UTC

uncivlengr wrote:A slash isn't going to be written in cursive letters... it's always a separate character. If you write "one/two" by hand, do you start the slash at the bottom?

Err, yes, yes of course. Where else would you start?

In (classical) written script you start all letters at the bottom. Except perhaps for a few capitals at the start of a sentence.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Rilian » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:48 am UTC

Diadem wrote:
uncivlengr wrote:A slash isn't going to be written in cursive letters... it's always a separate character. If you write "one/two" by hand, do you start the slash at the bottom?

Err, yes, yes of course.
No, that's idiotic.
Where else would you start?

The top, because that's easier.
And I'm -2.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby uncivlengr » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:49 am UTC

Diadem wrote:
uncivlengr wrote:A slash isn't going to be written in cursive letters... it's always a separate character. If you write "one/two" by hand, do you start the slash at the bottom?

Err, yes, yes of course. Where else would you start?

In (classical) written script you start all letters at the bottom. Except perhaps for a few capitals at the start of a sentence.
Look at the arrows indicated on the number '1' in this example. Characters like that (the slashes are no different) are written from the top down. Who taught you to write?
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby headsign » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:52 am UTC

Here, in Germany, people like to say "minus" for hyphens in web addresses. They're just too lazy to say "Bindestrich" :|

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby chrisk » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:56 am UTC

Small nitpick that doesn't excuse the main thrust of the comic, but I think it's a bit unfair to say that 'it's been almost twenty years' in this context.

The web may have been around for that long, but newscasters have not been giving web addresses on the air for that long of a time. Many newscasters have probably not even been going on the web for that long.

I'll now return you to your regularly scheduled discussion thread. ;)

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby kerohazel » Wed Apr 14, 2010 12:02 pm UTC

It's taking me more than a couple minutes to find confirmation of this (and my hunger is about to pull me out of the computer's grasp), but I believe that DOS inherited its use of forward slashes for command-line options from CP/M. So that wasn't so brain-dead. CP/M, IIRC, is more descended from "mainframe" OSes like the ones on DEC machines, than Unix. I imagine the DOS/Windows newline convention (CR LF) was also picked up from CP/M.

Can anyone confirm?

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby TizzyFoe » Wed Apr 14, 2010 12:11 pm UTC

I'm here to surrender some of my geek points. I never caught this mistake.

In my defense I always confused backslash (\) and forward slash (/). When making a backslash and starting at the top my pen moves forward on the page, but i often start at the bottom with my symbols, so idk what to think.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Plasma Man » Wed Apr 14, 2010 12:28 pm UTC

This reminded me of the old joke: How do you get to OJ Simpson's website? Slash, slash, backslash, escape.

It always bugged me that wouldn't ever work in any web browser.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby jc » Wed Apr 14, 2010 12:34 pm UTC

s0merand0mdude wrote:I always felt a bit of myself being destroyed by this, almost entirely because most anchors emphasize it when they say "backslash" in order to make sure people know what they're saying. It's just plain stupid. Journalists need to collectively step up their game on this.


Well, it doesn't bother me, because I like to use it as an example of how low the "profession" of journalism has fallen. I mean, they can't even be bothered to get such details right. How can you trust them when so many of them routinely make this mistake, and the rest can't be bothered to call them on it?

Of course, there's also the point that they don't all do this. We just don't notice the ones who get it right. But still, there seems to be little or no professional pressure for that obsolete practice called "fact checking" in such matters. So how can we trust that they got any of the rest of the facts right?

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby rhhardin » Wed Apr 14, 2010 12:44 pm UTC

Hello world./n $

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby joee » Wed Apr 14, 2010 12:54 pm UTC

HI GLASNT! my bus ran late :<

On topic, it took me a while to remember which was which. I swear some people I know will say "slash" and "slash going the other way", and ignore the whole forward/back dilemma.

Teaching first year CS students taught me to dumb down the names for symbols on the keyboard
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Diadem » Wed Apr 14, 2010 1:11 pm UTC

Rilian wrote:
Diadem wrote:
uncivlengr wrote:A slash isn't going to be written in cursive letters... it's always a separate character. If you write "one/two" by hand, do you start the slash at the bottom?

Err, yes, yes of course.
No, that's idiotic.

Very insightful. Unfortunately for you, most of the world disagrees with you.
Where else would you start?

The top, because that's easier.

You have to move your pen a lot more if you start at the top. And it's counter-intuitive, to write from right to left.

how do you write a division in mathematics? Do you star the horizontal bar at the right or the left? I've never seen anyone start it at the right.

uncivlengr wrote:
Diadem wrote:In (classical) written script you start all letters at the bottom. Except perhaps for a few capitals at the start of a sentence.
Look at the arrows indicated on the number '1' in this example. Characters like that (the slashes are no different) are written from the top down. Who taught you to write?

Classically, letters were not written individually, but glued together. This is rapidly going out of vogue with the rise of typwriters and computers, but that's nevertheless how people used to write.

If you write like that, you start every letter at the bottom left corner, and end every letter and the bottom right corner. If you don't do that, you can't glue them together. Here's the first picture I found at wikipedia:
Spoiler:
Image

As you can see, except for a few capitals which can start anywhere, all letters follow this pattern. Numbers do not, but they are always written individually.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby leifbk » Wed Apr 14, 2010 1:12 pm UTC

finlay wrote:I've never heard 'backslash' on UK television – when I was a child they used to say 'forward slash' in web addresses to make sure people got it right, actually.


How the time flies :shock:

When I was a child, computers were called "Electron brains' and were surrounded by men in white coats. It was common wisdom that there would never be a need for more than a handful of computers in the entire world. I was past thirty when I bought my first real computer, an 8-bit Z80 system. The CP/M operating system didn't have subdirectories, nor had Tim Berners-Lee invented the Web.

Computers were still a thing very few people cared about, and the people who did, certainly understood the difference between a slash and a backslash. Maybe people who don't should have their Interweb licence revoked :mrgreen:

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby compro01 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 1:16 pm UTC

joee wrote:Teaching first year CS students taught me to dumb down the names for symbols on the keyboard


doing tech support taught me to dumb it down to "the one that shares a key with the question mark".

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby rigwarl » Wed Apr 14, 2010 1:26 pm UTC

Diadem wrote:Very insightful. Unfortunately for you, most of the world disagrees with you.


Is that a statistic? I wouldn't know about Europe, but I'd bet money that at least 4 out of 5 Americans write slashes from top to bottom (no source, but I've seen over 95% in a moderate sample size of a few hundred). Yes, classical script starts from bottom to top, but from what I've seen, VERY few people prefer writing in cursive as opposed to print, where letters are written from top to bottom.

You're right about having to move the pen further though- I think the reasons we do so is an interesting subject. Flow, maybe?

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby DSDM » Wed Apr 14, 2010 1:28 pm UTC

And you know, you really don't have to say "www" anymore. And "http colon" is just uncalled for.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby uncivlengr » Wed Apr 14, 2010 1:36 pm UTC

Diadem wrote:Classically, letters were not written individually, but glued together. This is rapidly going out of vogue with the rise of typwriters and computers, but that's nevertheless how people used to write.
"Classically", slashes are not letters, and are written individually, just like numbers, other symbols, and punctuation.

If you wrote "one/two" cursively, you would link the "/" with the letters? That's not proper cursive writing, I have no idea what you're going on about.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby finlay » Wed Apr 14, 2010 1:44 pm UTC

Diadem wrote:
Rilian wrote:
Diadem wrote:
uncivlengr wrote:A slash isn't going to be written in cursive letters... it's always a separate character. If you write "one/two" by hand, do you start the slash at the bottom?

Err, yes, yes of course.
No, that's idiotic.

Very insightful. Unfortunately for you, most of the world disagrees with you.

... really though? It feels wrong doing it the other way. I just get the feeling that nobody in this little argument is actually backed up by anything.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby DragonHawk » Wed Apr 14, 2010 1:59 pm UTC

Exüberance wrote:Why would you use the standard escape character as a folder seperator? Wwwwhhhhhyyyy?

Someone told part of this story, but left out an important detail.

The slash character was used for "option switches" in operating systems from DEC (Digital Equipment Corp) at least as far back as the 1970s. DEC was huge back in the 1970s and 1980s, so lots of people were familiar with that.

(The slash (/) is still used for options in DEC VMS today. (VMS uses a syntax that now seems weird for file paths: DISK:[DIR.SUBDIR.SUBSUBDIR]FILE.EXT;1 (1 is the file version).) But I digress.)

(Microsoft has been heavily influenced by DEC. Any time you see a dollar sign in a file name or a reserved word, that's DEC influence. Windows NT (which 2000/XP/Vista/etc descend from) and DEC VMS were designed by the same person, and NT borrowed so much from VMS that DEC sued Microsoft. They settled out-of-court. It has been claimed this is the major reason Windows NT used to support the DEC Alpha. But again, I digress.)

So anyway, as has been mentioned, MS-DOS 1.0 did not support directories. But it did support option switches. So they chose the DEC method, since that was as good as any other. Making the switch character a reserved character does have certain advantages when it comes to command line syntax. (Unix has evolved the bare "--" convention, but it's inconsistently implemented.)

When MS-DOS 2.0 wanted directory support, they had to choose something. They chose backslash, for whatever reason. The issue of backslash (\) being a special character in things that came from Unix (C, Tex, etc.) was unlikely to be a big concern for people used to DEC and IBM systems, and doing most of their programming in assembler. Backslash was just an odd-ball, rarely used character. Perfect choice for a directory separator.

Years later, everybody regrets this turn of events, but I don't blame Microsoft for not being psychic. They had no way of knowing C and C-derived languages would come to dominate the world. Back in the early 1980s, Pascal was still a viable programming language, for crying out loud! (Trivia: VMS and the classic Macintosh OSes both implement significant chunks of code in Pascal.)

MS-DOS 2.0 even had the "SWITCHAR" directive, which would let you change the switch character to dash (-), and the directory separator to slash (/). But it was so little-used almost nothing outside the OS supported it -- even other Microsoft software.
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TheoGB wrote:However, broadcasters are always saying 'forward slash', which irritates the hell out of me. It's a SLASH, that's what it is: you don't have to clarify it with forward.

Obviously, you do have to clarify it, or we wouldn't be having this discussion.

I'm not surprised people who don't deal with computers for a living confuse (forward) slash (/) and backslash (\). If you're not a machine, they're practically the same thing.
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keithc wrote:I don't think they had redirection in the first versions of MS-DOS that had directories. Not sure about . and .. though

MS-DOS 1.0 did not support subdirectories, nor redirection. So comesfrom (<), gozinta (>), and pipe (|) were not special syntax, and . and .. would have served no purpose.

MS-DOS 2.0 introduced support for subdirectories and hard disks, and, I think, redirection.
Last edited by DragonHawk on Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:10 pm UTC, edited 2 times in total.
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Diadem
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Diadem » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:02 pm UTC

uncivlengr wrote:
Diadem wrote:Classically, letters were not written individually, but glued together. This is rapidly going out of vogue with the rise of typwriters and computers, but that's nevertheless how people used to write.
"Classically", slashes are not letters, and are written individually, just like numbers, other symbols, and punctuation.

If you wrote "one/two" cursively, you would link the "/" with the letters? That's not proper cursive writing, I have no idea what you're going on about.

No, of course not.

My example about cursive writing was to demonstrate that writing from the bottom up is quite normal, and is in fact how people used to write. You write from the left to the right and start at the bottom, in cursive script. Therefore a slash, which starts at the bottom and goes to the right, is indeed a forward slash, while a backslash is a backward one. So the names make sense. That was my point.
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freddyfish
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby freddyfish » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:12 pm UTC

URI? did he mean URL? or am I just missing something

Gargananana
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Gargananana » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:23 pm UTC

"Backslash" pisses me off, and "log on" pisses me off. For some reason, "log on" is now synonymous with "go to." I cringed every time my old computer teacher said "Log on to H-T-T-P, double-backslash, semicolon, dubya dubya, Google"

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Jorpho » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:32 pm UTC

Hey, remember how ubiquitous the tilde used to be in URLs? Aren't we glad that's gone? I can't recall if I ever heard a newscaster actually call it a "squiggly", but I have no doubt it happened...

freddyfish wrote:URI? did he mean URL? or am I just missing something
That was dealt with earlier on this page page 2. It is perfectly acceptable terminology and arises quite frequently in programming documentation.

jamesontv
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby jamesontv » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:33 pm UTC

BlazeOrangeDeer wrote:I always just figure they say backslash because they think it sounds cooler or something, and have heard other people use the term without bothering to remember which character they were actually referring to.


Maybe this all started with the O.J. Simpson joke. "Backslash" had a nice ring to it in that "URL," so stupid people just kept saying it (and the concentration of stupid people is pretty high amongst broadcasters).


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