1880: "Eclipse Review"

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1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby herbstschweigen » Wed Aug 23, 2017 11:19 am UTC

Image

Title text: "I watched from a beautiful nature reserve in central Missouri, and it was--without exaggeration--the coolest thing I've ever seen."

I would add "Aurora borealis" slightly left-upwards of "Partial Solar Eclipse".

(edited to unscramble unicode character in title text)

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby jozwa » Wed Aug 23, 2017 11:24 am UTC

Goddamn a total eclipse would have been cool to see. But it was on the other side of the planet. Guess I'll have to accept I'll never see one.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby cellocgw » Wed Aug 23, 2017 11:27 am UTC

I'm thinking that, other than the death part, viewing a supernova up close would be a whole lot more dramatic, not to mention extremely rare, event.

Maybe if one watches while translated just a bit in the 4th (spatial) dimension, it'd be safe.
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Leovan » Wed Aug 23, 2017 11:51 am UTC

How did the total eclipse compare to the annular eclipse in 2012? I was lucky enough to see that at Bryce Canyon and that was pretty cool. Immigration didn't work fast enough for me to see this one...

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Flumble » Wed Aug 23, 2017 11:52 am UTC

Dammit Randall, I bet we wouldn't have a fourth comic about eclipses!

"The ISS" is very nearby "Total Solar Eclipse".

Also what are the axes' units?

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby morriswalters » Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:12 pm UTC

They are relative magnitudes and the total eclipse is off the scale. This morning, for one second, I will rage at the RNG, because the astronauts have seen the shadow of the moon from orbit, and I never will. :evil:

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby orthogon » Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:14 pm UTC

cellocgw wrote:I'm thinking that, other than the death part, viewing a supernova up close would be a whole lot more dramatic, not to mention extremely rare, event.

How predictable is a supernova? I know that we can't currently predict them from the Earth, but if we were to send probes to a distant star, could those probes tell us when it was going to go supernova? Would it be more like an eclipse, or more like an earthquake?

There's an unstable feedback relationship between expectation of something and the actual experience. Part of how cool something turns out to be depends on how much it was hyped beforehand. I've started to mentally pre-correct my expectations, so that if everyone says something is amazing, I expect to be disappointed. This worked out really well for me when I saw the Taj Mahal, because it really was awesome; but I don't know now whether it was really awesome in absolute terms, or just a lot more awesome than my discounted expectation. (I'd seen the Terracotta Warriors a few years earlier and been underwhelmed, which was partly what led to my pre-correction strategy). Since then I've been telling people how the Taj Mahal was amazing in spite of the hype, but I'm slightly concerned that those people are going to be disappointed.

ETA: I saw the partial solar eclipse in Surrey, UK in 1999. That was way better than I expected, because I'd been beating myself up for not having the foresight to arrange to be in the totality strip. It was only in the hour or so beforehand that I suddenly realised that an eclipse in the high 90s would probably be pretty cool.
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby petercooperjr » Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:21 pm UTC

I have to say, a total lunar eclipse both sounds cooler and is cooler to see in person than a partial solar eclipse. (Just based on my experience here, where we had a total lunar a few years back which was amazing, and Monday's partial solar here was not nearly as great.)

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby flicky1991 » Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:22 pm UTC

Flumble wrote:Dammit Randall, I bet we wouldn't have a fourth comic about eclipses!
This is the fifth!
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby da Doctah » Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:26 pm UTC

Where should we place the mark for "lunar occultation of a planet or bright start"? Let's assume it's one that occurs at night-time, with the planet/star either disappearing behind the darkened limb of the crescent moon or emerging from behind same.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby orthogon » Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:35 pm UTC

da Doctah wrote:Where should we place the mark for "lunar occultation of a planet or bright start"? Let's assume it's one that occurs at night-time, with the planet/star either disappearing behind the darkened limb of the crescent moon or emerging from behind same.

It's cooler if the star/planet goes in front of the moon.
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby JPatten » Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:40 pm UTC

I will have to agree that it is one of the coolest things I have ever seen. Even with the clouds getting mostly in the way.
We viewed from the NorthEast corner of Georgia

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby herbstschweigen » Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:44 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:
da Doctah wrote:Where should we place the mark for "lunar occultation of a planet or bright start"? Let's assume it's one that occurs at night-time, with the planet/star either disappearing behind the darkened limb of the crescent moon or emerging from behind same.

It's cooler if the star/planet goes in front of the moon.


Image

SCNR.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby moody7277 » Wed Aug 23, 2017 1:01 pm UTC

The coolness of a solar eclipse as a function of distance is pretty much a delta function centered on totality.
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby herbstschweigen » Wed Aug 23, 2017 1:29 pm UTC

moody7277 wrote:The coolness of a solar eclipse as a function of distance is pretty much a delta function centered on totality.


Totality is really an unbeatable experience; but that being said, I find partial solar eclipses also very impressive. Especially when more than half the sun is obscured and you really have that "part-bitten-away" or "crescent" effect. (OK, you also see that before and after totality.)

Once in the early 90s I had the luck of seeing such a partial eclipse just before sunset, and due to a slightly cloudy horizon you could look at the sun with bare eyes, and that view of the "bitten-away" sun crescent setting evoked quite archaic emotions. Then again, some years ago there was a ~20% partial eclipse around noon here, so just a small "bite", you needed eclipse glasses, no horizon near the sun, and it was indeed by far not the same experience.)

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby cellocgw » Wed Aug 23, 2017 1:35 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:
cellocgw wrote:I'm thinking that, other than the death part, viewing a supernova up close would be a whole lot more dramatic, not to mention extremely rare, event.

How predictable is a supernova? I know that we can't currently predict them from the Earth, but if we were to send probes to a distant star, could those probes tell us when it was going to go supernova? Would it be more like an eclipse, or more like an earthquake?


Well, if you believe the publications from The Spatio-Analyst Institute , it's possible to predict to within a few years in some cases.
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Soupspoon » Wed Aug 23, 2017 1:40 pm UTC

jozwa wrote:Goddamn a total eclipse would have been cool to see. But it was on the other side of the planet. Guess I'll have to accept I'll never see one.

Are you kidding? You got to see a total eclipse of the Sun by the Earth! That's practically1 a once in a lifetime spectacle!


And, now, I just want to say "Annular". Annnnnuuuular…


1 Give or take a factor of around 30,000.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Himself » Wed Aug 23, 2017 2:24 pm UTC

I wouldn't expect there'd by much to see with a supernova. It would be so bright that you wouldn't see what was happening.
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Ken_g6 » Wed Aug 23, 2017 2:39 pm UTC

I have a feeling that once space travel outside cis-lunar space becomes commonplace, we'll have scheduled total eclipse-viewing ships every day.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Heimhenge » Wed Aug 23, 2017 3:39 pm UTC

herbstschweigen wrote:
I would add "Aurora borealis" slightly left-upwards of "Partial Solar Eclipse".



And I would add bolides (seen a few during Perseid meteor showers) to the chart. Maybe directly above "planetary conjunction" and about halfway up the vertical axis ... definitely cooler to see than a partial eclipse even though they only last a few seconds. And if you call the "bolide" a "fireball" instead, that would probably move it farther right on the horizontal axis.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby keithl » Wed Aug 23, 2017 3:45 pm UTC

Predicting supernovas

orthogon wrote: How predictable is a supernova? I know that we can't currently predict them from the Earth, but if we were to send probes to a distant star, could those probes tell us when it was going to go supernova?


The neutrino flux from a supernova goes off the charts in the hours before it explodes. A thousand-tonne glob of reflector-shielded ice at 100,000 AU (plentiful in the "Oort cloud" of a star, though a very hot massive star will disperse ice much closer than that, Jeans limit) will make a dandy neutrino detector at that distance, and we can watch the flux intensify as silicon burning intensifies in the core. That gives just enough time to turn the dispersion shield plates at 50AU around the solar system to diffuse the radiation flux pointed at Earth while not diffusing the radiation flux nearby.

Cosmic engineering, but we have megayears to do so before we wander into the path of a pre-supernova star. That will be part of a chapter in the book I am slowly writing. Protecting the biosphere of the Earth is our main responsibility, and the only way we will be here in a megayear is if we deeply understand that.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby keithl » Wed Aug 23, 2017 4:02 pm UTC

I watched it with 30 friends in Idaho Falls. Have you ever heard the rumble of a whole city cheering? Punctuated with police sirens; the cops were cheering, too.

The familiar Sun is replaced with a strange new object in the sky: a vast corona. Venus is brighter than you have EVER seen it, seemingly burning bright. The experience is like visiting a world orbiting another star.

TGLR got it exactly right. Annular/Partials are cool, but not in the same league.

I built a sunviewer out of junkbox optics, 7 centimeter projected image, very popular among the group before totality. I did use bailing wire, duct tape, and chewing gum. Two lenses and a 40 inch pipe feeding a cardboard box with two sides open, mounted on a camera tripod; it was mostly used to take pictures of each other beforehand. We got great pictures of a pretty teenage girl and her little dog looking at the image; I expect to see it on a magazine cover.

Afterwards, nobody gave a rip about the viewer box. Just our familiar Sun partly blocked by a ball of rock. Ho hum.

Full eclipses happen over land every few years, somewhere. South America in two years. US again (Texas and north) in 2024. Sell your car and TV, and buy a plane ticket to the place with the best weather. It's the closest you will ever get to star travel. Looking at photos, even great ones, is like a ringtone compared to a live performance by the world's best symphony.
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Aug 23, 2017 4:04 pm UTC

Last month I vacationed in Yosemite for the first time. I expected to have a good time but not really to be wowed. I live in a beautiful mountain valley myself and I've seen bigger mountains and bigger valleys and photos of Yosemite plenty and I expected it to just be another pretty nature place like the one I live in, but not "oooh, aaah".

But no, it was totally "oooh, aaah".
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby netsplit » Wed Aug 23, 2017 4:54 pm UTC

cellocgw wrote:I'm thinking that, other than the death part, viewing a supernova up close would be a whole lot more dramatic, not to mention extremely rare, event.

Maybe if one watches while translated just a bit in the 4th (spatial) dimension, it'd be safe.


Even just a bit of a super nova is quite dangerous
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby qazwart » Wed Aug 23, 2017 5:27 pm UTC

I was at St Joseph’s airport, so I couldn’t have been too far from Randal.

It was raining when the eclipse happened. We left the field about ten minutes before totality because it was staring to pour and the cloud cover made it impossible to see the sun. Might as well beat the crowds home.

As we were leaving the airport, we came upon a pond and we saw people standing around looking and pointing up. One of the passengers screamed “pull over” and we piled out of the car. There was a small break in the clouds and we could see the sun just as totality set in. I saw the Bailey beads and the corona. Then, the sun disappeared behind the clouds. Suddenly everything went dark.

I saw totality for less than a second and it was the most awesome thing I’ve seen in six decades of existence. I flew over 2000 miles for that. It was worth it.

You use Drake equations and you might calculate there may be a dozen to a few hundred advanced civilizations in our galaxy. However, not one of them would have their sun and their moon in just the right position to see what we get on our lousy little rock. They may have solved faster than light travel. They may have cured all diseases. They may even have holographic sex. But, they don’t get eclipses like we do. And, I bet that makes them so jealous.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby sotanaht » Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:39 pm UTC

Flumble wrote:Dammit Randall, I bet we wouldn't have a fourth comic about eclipses!

"The ISS" is very nearby "Total Solar Eclipse".

Also what are the axes' units?

It would probably be pretty fucking cool to see a total solar eclipse from orbit. Or maybe not, without all the stuff in the way it might really just look like a thing going in front of another thing.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Evadman » Wed Aug 23, 2017 7:42 pm UTC

I was lucky enough to be within driving distance of totality, but barely. Drove 5 hours to get there, to a national park about 10 miles from carbondale, illinois to a very specific parking spot that I picked out a few months in advance here. Got there 4 minutes after the park opened, and literally parked my car on the dead center of the totality line (or at least within a few feet). GPS placed me 3 feet southwest of the center. Got 161.4 seconds worth of totality according to that; max was 161.6.

Got lucky, and weather was absolutely perfect. Very few clouds, but a bunch in a horseshoe shape around us probably a few hundred miles away in every direction. In the last few minutes, colors went wonky, almost desaturated. When the cloud tops in the northwest fell into shadow, a few hundred of my closest friends laying in the grass started cheering because it was coming. It was oh-so-close. It still looked almost 'normal' for light output, still had shadows and such.

Then it went from nearly 'daytime' to full-moon night light levels in the course of 5 seconds. Absolutely amazing. Words can't do it justice. a 99% eclipse is so far away from the experience of a 100% eclipse it isn't even funny. Nowhere near the same league. Pictures do not do the experience justice in any way. If someone says '90% is just as good', then they haven't seen an actual full eclipse and are trying to make themselves feel better for missing it.

The first sliver of the sun appeared behind the moon, my few hundred friends all got disappointed at the same time with a collective 'awwww'.

I then spent 14 hours in a car driving home because everyone left at the same time. Every road everywhere in the vicinity of carbondale was a parking lot. I tried to stop at a cullivers for dinner at 8 pm that was about 30 miles away from my eclipse viewing spot and 5.5 hours after I left (for those at home: determine my average speed) but there had to be two thousand cars in line. Everything everywhere was full of cars. streets, fields of grass, the median of the roads, didn't matter, there were cars there. People were walking a good mile to get into the cullivers. I was driving on things that may or may not have legally been 'a road', and I was happy that I had a actual off-road capable truck. Some of that mud was a deep.

The difference was 87.4% coverage where I live to 100% where I went. ~19 hours of driving and roughly 5 hours of waiting for that last 13% and a view that lasted 161 seconds.

I would do it again in an instant.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby fibonacci » Wed Aug 23, 2017 7:43 pm UTC

The event from northeast Ohio was still impressive. ~83% coverage according to the news. For the duration, the birds all went quiet, save a few cardinals making what I think of as the "you're too close to my nest" noises. The sky went off color very similar to the yellowish tinge it gets when tornado warning/watch alerts are being issued. About a minute in the crickets began chirping the way they typically do in the evening, followed shortly thereafter by cicadas with their night time cacophony. I looked around expectantly for lightning bugs getting in on the act, but they seemed "unphased" (unfazed just doesn't describe the situation quite as well as this) by the occlusion. At the height of the partial eclipse I was given the impression of dusk happening from the wrong direction. Clouds that had appeared fluffy and mostly harmless, like the usual passersby, suddenly took on the appearance of rain clouds from the shade they'd received. As the moon moved on, the insects went quiet as the birds resumed their daytime singing. Throughout, chipmunks continued their incessant barking, nature's equivalent of "cellphone using moviegoers".

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby zjxs » Wed Aug 23, 2017 11:39 pm UTC

herbstschweigen wrote:
Title text: "I watched from a beautiful nature reserve in central Missouri, and it was--without exaggeration--the coolest thing I've ever seen."



An cirrostratus cloud is -- without exaggeration -- the coolest thing I've ever seen.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby sotanaht » Thu Aug 24, 2017 12:06 am UTC

My city was at 97% but I forgot to go outside in time. Look over at my clock thinking "the eclipse should be soon... oh that was 20 minutes ago, oops"

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Myself » Thu Aug 24, 2017 12:08 am UTC

Evadman wrote:I was lucky enough to be within driving distance of totality, but barely. Drove 5 hours to get there


Yo. Detroit to Adairville, KY. About 8 hours down, with my sister who had just herself driven cross-country so I wasn't about to ask her to spend any more time behind the wheel.

We drove through the night, meandered into the path of this-ought-to-be-totality-in-a-few-hours, and cruised around for a good place to park that wouldn't bother anyone. Side of a farm road, side of a main road, maybe a disused parking lot somewhere. Wanted to be out of the crowds, so the big parks and organized events and stuff were out of the question.

The road on which we'd been meandering (KY-431) turned into Main Street as it entered Adairville, and I leaned on the regenerative brakes to avoid the inevitable speed trap. Didn't see a cop, oddly enough, but suddenly the right side of the road opened up into a postcard-picturesque little town square. We turned in to make a loop around it and check the place out, and immediately noticed that a pickup truck was already there (it was roughly 6am, barely sunrise), and they were unloading a Dobsonian from the back.

Our people!

We exchanged greetings with our fellow Earthlings, and decided this little town square would be a fine-ass place to see the event from. We were 3.6 miles from the line of greatest awe, but 2m39s of totality seemed like plenty, and you couldn't ask for a sleepier little town. Or so I thought. No sooner had we made our first observations, than a woman bustled across the square from the bank building on the other side, hand extended, to welcome us! She was on the city council, and made sure to point out where the nearest bathrooms could be found (the gas station around the corner), the city's official eclipse event (at a park just up the road, no thanks, we're here specifically because we're not big on organized events), and a moment layer she flagged down the mayor, who happened to be driving past. The mayor then welcomed us and said she had no idea how many eclipse-folks to expect, but she hoped we had a great time. Well alrighty then!

Over the next few hours, roughly two dozen cars filtered into the spaces around the square itself and the adjoining parking lots. Between 50-100 people eventually milled around the square, with blankets and picnic chairs, sun-viewing glasses and cardboard-box viewers, binoculars and telescopes. I saw quite a few coolers and sandwiches, but no barbecues, oddly enough.

Evadman wrote: a few hundred of my closest friends laying in the grass


Funny how that happens, isn't it?

I've never felt more comfortable among a group of complete strangers. It was like going to a concert for the world's chillest band, with the world's nicest audience. Everyone talked to everyone, binoculars and viewers were passed around like at a family event. It sort of felt like a family reunion, yeah!

Everyone offered everyone sunscreen (apparently everyone brought enough for everyone, too), eclipse glasses, water, and advice about the gas-station around the corner. The family next to us was clad mostly in Girl Scouts regalia, and that plus a comment about my sister's unnatural hair color was enough to start an instant conversation about pretty much everything.

The group to the other side might've been a large family, or two groups of strangers whose blankets happened to be more adjacent. I don't know, but we talked about all manner of planetary and photographic curiosities, past eclipses, gear and filters, Bailey's Beads and this odd shimmering effect that I don't remember the name of but I caught on video with my n'th other camera.

Evadman wrote: It still looked almost 'normal' for light output, still had shadows and such.


Yeah! The color wasn't yellow like sunset, or pallid like moonlight, it was still the color and quality of sunlight, just less intense, and colder -- all the warmth had gone out of it, and I realized how much the heat of full sun was associated with the light itself, in my mind.

Evadman wrote: a 99% eclipse is so far away from the experience of a 100% eclipse it isn't even funny.


Pictures, words, even videos don't do it justice. I had my GoPro trained on the crowd the whole time, and there's sort of an anxious shuffle and a collective gasp, then a spontaneous uncoordinated cheer. But none of those convey the internal exhilaration, the heart-flippingly-intense experience. It's just that, with no culturally proscribed way to express that outwardly, some of us foundered around for a moment and arrived at cheering. If someone told me I was supposed to cheer in proportion to how cool it felt, the whole town would've echoed and I'd still be hoarse now, days later.

Evadman wrote: ~19 hours of driving and roughly 5 hours of waiting for that last 13% and a view that lasted 161 seconds.

I would do it again in an instant.


Amen.

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby somitomi » Thu Aug 24, 2017 12:48 am UTC

Man, I really wish I could remember the 1999 eclipse, but I was like four at the time. At least we are well equipped with eclipse viewing glasses for the occasional partial eclipse.
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby flymousechiu » Thu Aug 24, 2017 2:14 am UTC

the graph looks quadratic. I wonder about the place of "closing your eyelids and cause a universal eclipse".

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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby flymousechiu » Thu Aug 24, 2017 2:17 am UTC

cellocgw wrote:I'm thinking that, other than the death part, viewing a supernova up close would be a whole lot more dramatic, not to mention extremely rare, event.

Maybe if one watches while translated just a bit in the 4th (spatial) dimension, it'd be safe.


if you can observe it then it means that the supernova is able to interact with you in a meaningful way. even if it's a tiny part of some spectrum, you will be annihilated pretty quick.

not to mention that gravity possibly transcends dimensions (am i right? could be that i just don't understand science)

Edit: PS: To be safer, feel free to simulate observing a supernova up close by staying in the darkness for over half an hour and turn on a pack of LEDs right in front of your eyes. Still pretty dangerous, but way safer and less expensive.

flymousechiu
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby flymousechiu » Thu Aug 24, 2017 2:29 am UTC

zjxs wrote:
herbstschweigen wrote:
Title text: "I watched from a beautiful nature reserve in central Missouri, and it was--without exaggeration--the coolest thing I've ever seen."



An cirrostratus cloud is -- without exaggeration -- the coolest thing I've ever seen.


you mean the coldest?

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brakos82
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby brakos82 » Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:54 am UTC

herbstschweigen wrote:
moody7277 wrote:The coolness of a solar eclipse as a function of distance is pretty much a delta function centered on totality.


Totality is really an unbeatable experience; but that being said, I find partial solar eclipses also very impressive. Especially when more than half the sun is obscured and you really have that "part-bitten-away" or "crescent" effect. (OK, you also see that before and after totality.)

Once in the early 90s I had the luck of seeing such a partial eclipse just before sunset, and due to a slightly cloudy horizon you could look at the sun with bare eyes, and that view of the "bitten-away" sun crescent setting evoked quite archaic emotions. Then again, some years ago there was a ~20% partial eclipse around noon here, so just a small "bite", you needed eclipse glasses, no horizon near the sun, and it was indeed by far not the same experience.)


For the 2019 eclipse, just south of Buenos Aires has totality happen right before sunset. Where I'm looking at going, about 200km west-by-northwest of B.A., is just a few degrees higher in the sky.
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Boilerplate
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Boilerplate » Thu Aug 24, 2017 12:32 pm UTC

Leovan wrote:How did the total eclipse compare to the annular eclipse in 2012? I was lucky enough to see that at Bryce Canyon and that was pretty cool. Immigration didn't work fast enough for me to see this one...


Literally the difference between night and day.

An annular eclipse is 10x cooler that an ordinary partial of 90% or less, but 10x less cool than a 99% partial in which the solar corona and nearby darkening is visible. And 100x less cool than totality.

I have observed Totality twice, including recently, annual once, and partial enough times to not bother going outside. A total lunar eclipse is 5x cooler than partial solar (of less than 90%).

Boilerplate
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby Boilerplate » Thu Aug 24, 2017 1:03 pm UTC

Myself wrote:
Evadman wrote: It still looked almost 'normal' for light output, still had shadows and such.


Yeah! The color wasn't yellow like sunset, or pallid like moonlight, it was still the color and quality of sunlight, just less intense, and colder -- all the warmth had gone out of it, and I realized how much the heat of full sun was associated with the light itself, in my mind.


We are naturally accustomed to light getting redder as it diminishes. This applies with firelight, incandescent lamplight, and sunlight (sunsets).

Eclipse light is different. It dims by a factor of ~100 without changing color, yet we don't get the warming we intuitively expect (even from the filtering effect of clouds). LED light is the same, and when dimmed yields a cold and creepy effect.

Calling it "the coolest thing I have ever seen" is about the best description I have heard.

incidentally, the aurora can be much cooler than a lunar eclipse or a partial solar eclipse.

kelly_holden
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Location: Rural New South Wales

Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby kelly_holden » Fri Aug 25, 2017 10:52 am UTC

Okay, you convinced me, Randall.
*Googles*
it looks like the next eclipse accessible to an Aussie who doesn't, and isn't likely ever to, have the resources for international travel is in 2028, and the nearest place in the path of totality is ... about 20 minutes drive from my house. I've gone further for a picnic.
*adds to google calendar*

rmsgrey
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Re: 1880: "Eclipse Review"

Postby rmsgrey » Fri Aug 25, 2017 6:05 pm UTC

Boilerplate wrote:Eclipse light is different. It dims by a factor of ~100 without changing color


Worse than that - the dim blue glow of the rest of the sky stays roughly constant in intensity, while the yellower direct sunlight gets masked, so the lighting gets slightly bluer.


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