1874: "Geologic faults"

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Raidri
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1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Raidri » Wed Aug 09, 2017 1:36 pm UTC

Image

Title text: "I live on a torn-bag-of-potato-chips-where-the-tear-is-rapidly-growing fault, which is terrifying."

Taking bets on how many of these are real and how many are fake. Seems about half and half to me.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Devil N » Wed Aug 09, 2017 1:47 pm UTC

"I live on a torn-bag-of-potato-chips-where-the-tear-is-rapidly-growing fault, which is terrifying."


Well that's your own fault.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Soupspoon » Wed Aug 09, 2017 1:48 pm UTC

4/9 Geologic (and several variations not mentioned, depending on how simple or comprehensive you want to go).

Also forgot the Your Fault. Or two Your Faults, exactly the same but mirrored.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby geomike » Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:03 pm UTC

Raidri wrote:Taking bets on how many of these are real and how many are fake. Seems about half and half to me.


LOL

# 1, 2, 3, 4, & 8 are all real. The remainder are analogies used by geologists. If Randall had delved further into the snack food realm, the drawings would have included snickers, oreos, and so much more.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Soupspoon » Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:07 pm UTC

I missed #8, through its non-standard (to me, at least!) naming of a compound real fault.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Peaceful Whale » Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:18 pm UTC

Wait, so #8, the "brio fault" is real? I really hope you're pulling my leg here.
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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Raidri » Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:23 pm UTC

Peaceful Whale wrote:Wait, so #8, the "brio fault" is real? I really hope you're pulling my leg here.

That is #9, geologists use 1-based-indexing.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby cellocgw » Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:29 pm UTC

Soupspoon wrote:4/9 Geologic (and several variations not mentioned, depending on how simple or comprehensive you want to go).

Also forgot the Your Fault. Or two Your Faults, exactly the same but mirrored.


A genuine YourFault is rare; more often it's a misidentified NotMyFault
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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Soupspoon » Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:41 pm UTC

Raidri wrote:
Peaceful Whale wrote:Wait, so #8, the "brio fault" is real? I really hope you're pulling my leg here.

That is #9, geologists use 1-based-indexing.

Despite this, I took (and then used) the #8 reference to mean the one someone who had bothered to check might normally consider the #7 one. Or Fault[0,2] (if it isn't Fault[2,0], that is).

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby pkcommando » Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:20 pm UTC

cellocgw wrote:
Soupspoon wrote:4/9 Geologic (and several variations not mentioned, depending on how simple or comprehensive you want to go).

Also forgot the Your Fault. Or two Your Faults, exactly the same but mirrored.


A genuine YourFault is rare; more often it's a misidentified NotMyFault

Not to mention the frequent misidentifications of MyFaults as Nobody'sFaults, or Everybody'sFaults.

Personally, I don't want to live anywhere near a Spreading-Nutella-On-A-Too-Thin-Pizzelle Fault. Those are crazy-unpredictable.
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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby moody7277 » Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:58 pm UTC

Devil N wrote:
"I live on a torn-bag-of-potato-chips-where-the-tear-is-rapidly-growing fault, which is terrifying."


Well that's your own fault.


To me that description sounds more like what happens in a supervolcanic eruption.
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Postby miket » Wed Aug 09, 2017 4:32 pm UTC

About those faults in the potato-chip-bag category:

What's up with the manufacturers of cereals, crackers, granola bars, and the like? It happens way too often that the seams are way too strong, that the bag breaks well before the seam comes unseamed.

Macbeth unseamed Macdonwald from nave to chops. What happens to these bags is not quite as messy, but it doesn't make me look kindly on their designers.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Flumble » Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:10 pm UTC

But what is default?

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:13 pm UTC

What gender is "fault"? Is it really die Fault, or should it be der Fault?
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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Envelope Generator » Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:40 pm UTC

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Heimhenge » Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:17 pm UTC

geomike wrote:
Raidri wrote:Taking bets on how many of these are real and how many are fake. Seems about half and half to me.


LOL

# 1, 2, 3, 4, & 8 are all real. The remainder are analogies used by geologists. If Randall had delved further into the snack food realm, the drawings would have included snickers, oreos, and so much more.


Damn it Jim, I'm a physicist ... not a geologist. But I really though #7 was legit. The angles on that "squeezed bar of soap" fault seem a bit too steep for the upward force to exceed sliding friction, but with a shallower angle it would seem possible. Or is #7 a "this never happens"?

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Soupspoon » Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:26 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:What gender is "fault"? Is it really die Fault, or should it be der Fault?

Das Fault

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Weeks » Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:38 pm UTC

Raidri wrote:
Peaceful Whale wrote:Wait, so #8, the "brio fault" is real? I really hope you're pulling my leg here.

That is #9, geologists use 1-based-indexing.
so are you still taking bets, i need to know
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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Weeks » Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:42 pm UTC

Peaceful Whale wrote:Wait, so #8, the "brio fault" is real? I really hope you're pulling my leg here.
theyre all real. Wheres my prize money.
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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Ranbot » Wed Aug 09, 2017 8:11 pm UTC

Raidri wrote:Taking bets on how many of these are real and how many are fake. Seems about half and half to me.

1, 2, 3, and 4 are real geologic faults
5 can represent geologic deformation, but the term given is fake
6 is a fake diagram with a real geologic fault term
7, 8, and 9 are fake [geologically speaking] (Kudos to #7 for geologic inspiration, because it's clearly a twist on a block diagram of a horst - if only either side of the "soap bar" were normal faults https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horst_(geology) )

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Weeks » Wed Aug 09, 2017 8:29 pm UTC

Ranbot wrote:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horst_(geology) )
huh, without using the url tag this comes up broken (doesn't include the closing parens)
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Re:

Postby x7eggert » Wed Aug 09, 2017 8:53 pm UTC

miket wrote:About those faults in the potato-chip-bag category:

What's up with the manufacturers of cereals, crackers, granola bars, and the like? It happens way too often that the seams are way too strong, that the bag breaks well before the seam comes unseamed.

Macbeth unseamed Macdonwald from nave to chops. What happens to these bags is not quite as messy, but it doesn't make me look kindly on their designers.


Most bags are stretched top-down, so any tear will want to go into that direction. Knowing that, you can tear it open sideways in order to prevent containment faults.

Also if you open bags by tearing apart the seam, don't pull with your arms, but grab both sides with thumb and index finger and roll your fists against each other, using your straight arms as levers. Since you don't use much strength that way, there is less chance of plinian chips eruption.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Hiferator » Wed Aug 09, 2017 9:10 pm UTC

I was expecting a joke like "your fault" or "The fault in our stars".

Ranbot wrote:1, 2, 3, and 4 are real geologic faults
5 can represent geologic deformation, but the term given is fake
6 is a fake diagram with a real geologic fault term
7, 8, and 9 are fake

Thanks for the list. So what is a splinted fault (6) then? I couldn't find that anywhere.
The thing about 5 and 8 is, that they don't show a fault at all (and 7 contains 2 faults).
Ranbot wrote:Kudos to #7 for geologic inspiration, because it's clearly a twist on a block diagram of a horst - if only either side of the "soap bar" were normal faults https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horst_(geology) )

I thought it was just a reversed Graben. For a Horst, the fault lines would need to skew in the opposite direction. (The article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graben incidentally still uses the Horst diagram as the main image.)

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Ranbot » Wed Aug 09, 2017 10:44 pm UTC

Weeks wrote:
Ranbot wrote:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horst_(geology) )
huh, without using the url tag this comes up broken (doesn't include the closing parens)

Sorry... try this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horst_(geology)
...Or see Hiferator's Graben link.

Hiferator wrote:Thanks for the list. So what is a splinted fault (6) then? I couldn't find that anywhere.
The thing about 5 and 8 is, that they don't show a fault at all (and 7 contains 2 faults).

I had to look up splinter fault, but it is used occasionally in research papers to describe faults that branch from large fault, or minor unnamed faults within a larger fault zone. I am curious why Randall picked up that esoteric term over other fault types that could one could easily poke fun at.

Hiferator wrote:
Ranbot wrote:Kudos to #7 for geologic inspiration, because it's clearly a twist on a block diagram of a horst - if only either side of the "soap bar" were normal faults https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horst_(geology) )

I thought it was just a reversed Graben. For a Horst, the fault lines would need to skew in the opposite direction. (The article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graben incidentally still uses the Horst diagram as the main image.)

A graben is by definition a depressed [or dropped] block of rock, you can't really reverse it. The closest thing to a "reverse graben" is the horst, but both are created in rifting zones (extensional forces) and are typically found together. If the forces are reversed (compressional) it would create thrust faults, not reverse grabens.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby serutan » Thu Aug 10, 2017 5:11 am UTC

Flumble wrote:But what is default?


It's always San Andreas' fault.
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Re:

Postby pkcommando » Thu Aug 10, 2017 1:58 pm UTC

miket wrote:About those faults in the potato-chip-bag category:

What's up with the manufacturers of cereals, crackers, granola bars, and the like? It happens way too often that the seams are way too strong, that the bag breaks well before the seam comes unseamed.

Macbeth unseamed Macdonwald from nave to chops. What happens to these bags is not quite as messy, but it doesn't make me look kindly on their designers.

For each inch of seam, 1 pound of C-4.

Or scissors. You know, whatever's available.
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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Ranbot » Thu Aug 10, 2017 2:15 pm UTC

Hiferator wrote:...So what is a splinted fault (6) then? I couldn't find that anywhere.

Oh shit, I looked at this again realized I imagined splinter fault and just kept reading that instead of splinted fault. Total tunnel-vision on my part. So, yeah you're right.... splinted fault (#6) is all fake. Sorry for that.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby zjxs » Fri Aug 11, 2017 3:32 am UTC

Depending on where you live, My Fault or Your Fault are usually the most common faults.

The rifts they cause are usually quite low on the Mercali Intensity Scale. Don't build your house on one, however.

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby orthogon » Fri Aug 11, 2017 7:53 am UTC

pkcommando wrote:
miket wrote:About those faults in the potato-chip-bag category:

What's up with the manufacturers of cereals, crackers, granola bars, and the like? It happens way too often that the seams are way too strong, that the bag breaks well before the seam comes unseamed.

Macbeth unseamed Macdonwald from nave to chops. What happens to these bags is not quite as messy, but it doesn't make me look kindly on their designers.

For each inch of seam, 1 pound of C-4.

Or scissors. You know, whatever's available.

In our office we get sachets of coffee for the percolator. They used to come with a little nick cut into one edge so they could be easily torn open. Then suddenly they stopped having this. The edges are "crinkle cut" so there are lots of sharp interior angles, and it's still sometimes possible to start the tear at one of these. But it's chance whether it works or not. Now there's a pair of scissors, and on average it's better to get the scissors out of the cupboard than to keep trying to tear the sachet by hand. The point is: why oh why did they make the change? My two theories are that they were tearing open by accident or that cutting the nick was costing a few millipence per unit and they wanted to increase the profit margin. But I hate it when things that worked perfectly well get uninvented. (See also: computer software).
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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby da Doctah » Fri Aug 11, 2017 12:16 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:
pkcommando wrote:
miket wrote:About those faults in the potato-chip-bag category:

What's up with the manufacturers of cereals, crackers, granola bars, and the like? It happens way too often that the seams are way too strong, that the bag breaks well before the seam comes unseamed.

Macbeth unseamed Macdonwald from nave to chops. What happens to these bags is not quite as messy, but it doesn't make me look kindly on their designers.

For each inch of seam, 1 pound of C-4.

Or scissors. You know, whatever's available.

In our office we get sachets of coffee for the percolator. They used to come with a little nick cut into one edge so they could be easily torn open. Then suddenly they stopped having this. The edges are "crinkle cut" so there are lots of sharp interior angles, and it's still sometimes possible to start the tear at one of these. But it's chance whether it works or not. Now there's a pair of scissors, and on average it's better to get the scissors out of the cupboard than to keep trying to tear the sachet by hand. The point is: why oh why did they make the change? My two theories are that they were tearing open by accident or that cutting the nick was costing a few millipence per unit and they wanted to increase the profit margin. But I hate it when things that worked perfectly well get uninvented. (See also: computer software).


This is why I keep a box cutter in my shirt pocket. This, and CD cases, and grocery coupons, and the twine they use to bundle newspapers, and the reinforced tape Amazon uses to seal cartons, and....

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Re: 1874: "Geologic faults"

Postby Hiferator » Fri Aug 11, 2017 7:14 pm UTC

Ranbot wrote:Oh shit, I looked at this again realized I imagined splinter fault and just kept reading that instead of splinted fault. Total tunnel-vision on my part. So, yeah you're right.... splinted fault (#6) is all fake. Sorry for that.

Hah, I didn't notice the difference in your first post either. Funny how these very closely related terms have almost opposite meanings, because a splint(er) which is broken of something can then be used to splint and thus (often) rejoin something else.

Ranbot wrote:A graben is by definition a depressed [or dropped] block of rock, you can't really reverse it. The closest thing to a "reverse graben" is the horst, but both are created in rifting zones (extensional forces) and are typically found together. If the forces are reversed (compressional) it would create thrust faults, not reverse grabens.

I understand that, it was just not my first association, because of the different shapes (or rather orientation of shapes) in the usual diagram for a horst.
When I wrote "reverse graben", I didn't mean to imply such a thing exists, just in my mind both diagrams show a movement already in progress that may start with an even surface. So if you reverse all the arrows from Randall's diagram, the indicated movement leads to a graben and if you keep them as they are, it leads to Randall's diagram (if movement according to those arrows were possible), i.e. a graben would sink while the sides drift apart, whereas in Randall's diagram the middle part has already (hypothetically) risen, while the sides are converging.


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