1715: "Household Tips"

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1715: "Household Tips"

Postby squall_line » Wed Aug 03, 2016 2:36 pm UTC

Image

Title Text: "To make your shoes feel more comfortable, smell better, and last longer, try taking them off before you shower."

Hooray for Oxford Commas!

Also, Upper Decker references are almost always funny. :)

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby O-Deka-K » Wed Aug 03, 2016 2:46 pm UTC

Are "household tips" like life hacks? :wink:

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby somitomi » Wed Aug 03, 2016 2:52 pm UTC

O-Deka-K wrote:Are "household tips" like life hacks? :wink:

Yeah, except the internet hasn't completely obliterated the value of the term "household tips" by using it for anything slightly not obvious.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby melbrod » Wed Aug 03, 2016 3:35 pm UTC

This one’s a direct quote from just about any owner's manual troubleshooting Q&A.

Appliance won’t turn on?
Check to see if it is plugged in and switched on.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby svenman » Wed Aug 03, 2016 3:44 pm UTC

melbrod wrote:This one’s a direct quote from just about any owner's manual troubleshooting Q&A.

And it's there for good reason...

melbrod wrote:Appliance won’t turn on?
Check to see if it is plugged in and switched on.

Appliance still won't turn on?
Check again. For reals this time.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby orthogon » Wed Aug 03, 2016 4:01 pm UTC

Curiosity question: are windows that slide upwards common in the US? In London and other UK cities, lots of older houses have wooden sash windows that work like that, but they're seen as a bit of a period feature and most are being replaced with uPVC windows that hinge outwards (with the hinge either vertical or horizontal). uPVC replacement sash windows are available but they're more expensive and tend to only be fitted in "conservation areas" where any modifications are required to maintain the original appearance.

ETA: The trouble with sash windows is that they tend to jam, particularly if they've been painted a few times; also the cords connecting the window to the counterweight can break and it's a big job to repair them.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Justin Lardinois » Wed Aug 03, 2016 4:40 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:Curiosity question: are windows that slide upwards common in the US? In London and other UK cities, lots of older houses have wooden sash windows that work like that, but they're seen as a bit of a period feature and most are being replaced with uPVC windows that hinge outwards (with the hinge either vertical or horizontal). uPVC replacement sash windows are available but they're more expensive and tend to only be fitted in "conservation areas" where any modifications are required to maintain the original appearance.

ETA: The trouble with sash windows is that they tend to jam, particularly if they've been painted a few times; also the cords connecting the window to the counterweight can break and it's a big job to repair them.


The US is a huge country with a lot of different climates, so it probably varies regionally.

Here in northern California, windows that slide upwards or sideways are the norm in residential dwellings built in the last few decades. Windows that open outwards are less common, but I did have them in my college dorm. Also worth noting is that windows here almost always have a screen on them to keep bugs out.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Shadowman615 » Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:04 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:Curiosity question: are windows that slide upwards common in the US? In London and other UK cities, lots of older houses have wooden sash windows that work like that, but they're seen as a bit of a period feature and most are being replaced with uPVC windows that hinge outwards (with the hinge either vertical or horizontal). uPVC replacement sash windows are available but they're more expensive and tend to only be fitted in "conservation areas" where any modifications are required to maintain the original appearance.

ETA: The trouble with sash windows is that they tend to jam, particularly if they've been painted a few times; also the cords connecting the window to the counterweight can break and it's a big job to repair them.


They're very common in Eastern U.S. also. Most modern ones have aluminum frames (or aluminum, as you guys call it), and are well sealed with rubber/silicon and soft fabric-ey gaskets and such. No counterweights, just possibly spring-loaded or they latch in place, or sometimes just are held in place when raised by the rubber seals. There's always a screen outside as well.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:09 pm UTC

Shadowman615 wrote:aluminum frames (or aluminum, as you guys call it)
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby CelticNot » Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:16 pm UTC

Way up here in mid-Alberta, most windows are designed to slide sideways rather than up - it probably minimizes the likelihood of damage to either window or person when attempting to open them in the spring (since inevitably, your windows will freeze shut from the build-up of snow and ice). When we got our kitchen windows redone, however, they put in casement windows with cranks.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby DanD » Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:17 pm UTC

Shadowman615 wrote:
orthogon wrote:Curiosity question: are windows that slide upwards common in the US? In London and other UK cities, lots of older houses have wooden sash windows that work like that, but they're seen as a bit of a period feature and most are being replaced with uPVC windows that hinge outwards (with the hinge either vertical or horizontal). uPVC replacement sash windows are available but they're more expensive and tend to only be fitted in "conservation areas" where any modifications are required to maintain the original appearance.

ETA: The trouble with sash windows is that they tend to jam, particularly if they've been painted a few times; also the cords connecting the window to the counterweight can break and it's a big job to repair them.


They're very common in Eastern U.S. also. Most modern ones have aluminum frames (or aluminum, as you guys call it), and are well sealed with rubber/silicon and soft fabric-ey gaskets and such. No counterweights, just possibly spring-loaded or they latch in place, or sometimes just are held in place when raised by the rubber seals. There's always a screen outside as well.


You can get a mix of aluminum, vinyl, and wood. I would actually say that vinyl is the most common in newer construction. But yes, they are the standard everywhere in the country as far as I am aware. Sliding screens (that only covered half the window) used to be common, but newer ones tend to have single screens the entire height of the opening. You do, occasionally, see the vertically or horizontally hinged ones, with a crank, but they are rare. They also aren't typically quite the same as the ones I see in Europe. Those typically hinge all the way at the edge. In the US most of them hinge about 1/3 in from the edge, with the narrow bit swinging inward and the wide bit swinging outward. Practically speaking, I'm not sure there's a huge advantage to either.

One feature that most newer sash windows have is a design that allows them to tip inwards for cleaning (by removing half of the mechanism from the track). This makes them as easy to clean as our pivoting windows, and somewhat easier than the European ones I've seen.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Envelope Generator » Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:35 pm UTC

After you've gotten the windows off their hinges, can't you just set them on the floor or something instead of holding them up?
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby keldor » Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:36 pm UTC

My house has mostly vertical sliding windows, though there are a couple windows that are wider than they are tall that slide horizontally to open. There's also a tiny crank based window that opens outward in the master bathroom.

Interestingly, we replaced some of the windows a few years back (they were getting old and the seals had gone bad and so forth) and ended up with some vertical sliding ones where both the top half and the bottom half can slide. This lets you crack open the very top of the window by sliding the top down and so forth. The downside is that they need full window screens instead of half window screens.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Altzan » Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:40 pm UTC

somitomi wrote:Yeah, except the internet hasn't completely obliterated the value of the term "household tips" by using it for anything slightly not obvious.


As someone who is quite fond of the idea of a lifehack, it's definitely saddening to see how often it's thrown around nowadays - usually for more obvious things or for tips that have been repeated/recirculated a million times over. Although finding an occasionally good lifehack is a great feeling, especially when you feel dumb for not having thought of it before. (I feel that a lot.)

orthogon wrote:Curiosity question: are windows that slide upwards common in the US?


I can only speak for my region as part of Tennessee, but I have yet to ever encounter a residential house window that didn't slide upward. A few community/college places have sideways windows though.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Invertin » Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:52 pm UTC

I can't help but mentally compare this to all the "tips to save money!" that I've seen...

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:53 pm UTC

When cleaning, look for a horizontal surface of wood, tile or fabric and stop there.

I imagine Q-ball's house has at least one ceiling fan installed somewhere other than the ceiling.

relevant
O-Deka-K wrote:Are "household tips" like life hacks?
Sort of. The phrase "household tips" is much older.
Justin Lardinois wrote:
orthogon wrote:Curiosity question: are windows that slide upwards common in the US?
The US is a huge country with a lot of different climates, so it probably varies regionally.
In the southeast keeping mosquitoes out is a must, so a window that doesn't have a screen is functionally a window that does not open.

There are some variety of blood sucking insects all along the east, all the way to the arctic. Although not as many or for as much of the year.

As I write this, I realize I don't know much about weather sealing of hinge windows, but if they're inferior that's a bigger issue in much of the US. As far south as Virginia winters are noticeably more severe than in England.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Archgeek » Wed Aug 03, 2016 6:16 pm UTC

Shadowman615 wrote:They're very common in Eastern U.S. also. Most modern ones have aluminum frames (or aluminum, as you guys call it), and are well sealed with rubber/silicon and soft fabric-ey gaskets and such. No counterweights, just possibly spring-loaded or they latch in place, or sometimes just are held in place when raised by the rubber seals. There's always a screen outside as well.


A screen which invariably smells terrible for some reason. They also don't stop pollen or small insects like ants, gnats, and some mosquitoes.
Notably, the aluminium-frame ones can be strange to have in a kitchen in winter -- it's always odd to see a thick frost on the latch handle as a result of sub-freezing outside temperatures and the humidity from a boiling pot of something.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Grop » Wed Aug 03, 2016 6:40 pm UTC

I had forgotten that guillotin windows were popular in the US.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby somitomi » Wed Aug 03, 2016 7:10 pm UTC

Grop wrote:I had forgotten that guillotin windows were popular in the US.

I find that strange too, but then I realise our windows fall out, if you move the handle while they're open. I think the reason for the different windows is more cultural than practical.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby KarynMcD » Wed Aug 03, 2016 8:17 pm UTC

If you let the shower overflow from being on all day and if you overflow your clogged toilets, it normally takes care of the fire problem.
:D

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby cellocgw » Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:23 pm UTC

svenman wrote:
melbrod wrote:This one’s a direct quote from just about any owner's manual troubleshooting Q&A.

And it's there for good reason...

melbrod wrote:Appliance won’t turn on?
Check to see if it is plugged in and switched on.

Appliance still won't turn on?
Check again. For reals this time.

Which is the top item on every computer help desk everywhere. Remember-- nobody ecer went broke underestimating people's intelligence
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Eternal Density » Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:58 pm UTC

When I visited Cairns in northern Queensland, it took me a while to come to terms with the concept of windows without glass panes.
The idea of a house with no screens on any of the opening windows is really odd to me. Are there actually places without any bugs? Wow.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby rmsgrey » Wed Aug 03, 2016 10:26 pm UTC

Eternal Density wrote:When I visited Cairns in northern Queensland, it took me a while to come to terms with the concept of windows without glass panes.
The idea of a house with no screens on any of the opening windows is really odd to me. Are there actually places without any bugs? Wow.


England has bugs, but they're not abundant and, aside from the occasional wasp, irritating rather than harmful. Plus it's pretty rare for it to be warm enough to need a window open during the evenings, when bugs are most inclined to fly in (drawn by artificial light).

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby svenman » Wed Aug 03, 2016 10:30 pm UTC

In Germany and many neighbouring countries, windows open inward. Modern windows usually have a clever double-hinged mechanism where you can either swing the window all the way open around a vertical axis (also makes for easy cleaning unless there's furniture in the way) or tilt it inward a little bit around a horizontal axis along the bottom of the window (easier demonstrated than explained, e. g. in this video). These also tend to have double or triple glazing and effective seals, given that winters in much of Germany can get colder than in the more populous parts of the UK.

Bug screens are however not common in Germany. Allowing bugs to come in is just generally accepted here as an unavoidable risk of opening windows during the warm parts of the year.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby ThemePark » Wed Aug 03, 2016 11:27 pm UTC

svenman wrote:In Germany and many neighbouring countries, windows open inward. Modern windows usually have a clever double-hinged mechanism where you can either swing the window all the way open around a vertical axis (also makes for easy cleaning unless there's furniture in the way) or tilt it inward a little bit around a horizontal axis along the bottom of the window (easier demonstrated than explained, e. g. in this video). These also tend to have double or triple glazing and effective seals, given that winters in much of Germany can get colder than in the more populous parts of the UK.

Bug screens are however not common in Germany. Allowing bugs to come in is just generally accepted here as an unavoidable risk of opening windows during the warm parts of the year.

Windows like that are a rare occurrence here in Denmark. And yet it is exactly the window I have in my apartment. Though single-paned and goes all the way to the floor so only the top half can be opened, but it's that exact opening mechanism.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Flumble » Wed Aug 03, 2016 11:46 pm UTC

svenman wrote:In Germany and many neighbouring countries, windows open inward. Modern windows usually have a clever double-hinged mechanism where you can either swing the window all the way open around a vertical axis (also makes for easy cleaning unless there's furniture in the way) or tilt it inward a little bit around a horizontal axis along the bottom of the window (easier demonstrated than explained, e. g. in this video).

I wouldn't call those windows (both normal inwards and double-hinged) ubiquitous —there are at least as many top-hinged outward-tilting windows in the Netherlands—, but I thought the double-hinged mechanism would be known all over the world. However, the video implies that it's a European thing.

Some apartments nearby even have that mechanism for a door-sized window to their balcony. (instead of, you know, placing a regular door and making the window next to it openable)

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby BytEfLUSh » Thu Aug 04, 2016 12:24 am UTC

Huh, panel #2 is well timed for me. Two days ago, my dad was making attempting to make french fries on a stove when suddenly, "for no reason", the cooking oil caught fire. That was the first flash of light I saw, followed by another, much brighter, presumably as my dad tried to put out the fire by pouring water on it (though he denies that) as I ran towards the kitchen. Remarkably, he was not injured at all and the only damage was the melted fire alarm as it was right above the fire. Well, the walls need repainting, too. And the wooded frame of the door was kind of badly burned. The french fries were also ruined.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Soupspoon » Thu Aug 04, 2016 2:08 am UTC

You can tell your dad "well done", and mean it...

Windows,. My experiences of them...

I grew up in a house (UK) with wooden frames, the ones that open (not the big living room ones, but the bedroom ones) had the two side-thirds opening (outwards) by the outer edge, or one third like that, the top ?fifth? of the opposing third being top-hinged out and up. That was a ?60s? semi-detached bungalow with dorma upstairs. It started off single-glazed (for winter, an additional full-width/height pane of glass with rubber surround was clip-screwed onto the inside, making for a sort of inefficiently widely-gapped double-glazing setup (the openable windows now being inaccessible for opening until springtime and pane-removal). Eventually, proper double-glazed windows of various configurations were fitted (wooden frames).

One grandparents' house was a semi-detached bungalow of earlier vintage and I can't remember its windows. The other set originally had a mid-terrace, between-the-wars two-storey archetype and I think it was wooden sash windows, but rarely opened when I was there.

A village hall I frequented had multiple full-height windows that I can't remember much about, in their original form, but when I was 10 to 12 years' old, perhaps, were replaced with UPVC dual-opening versions as already aluded to (handle one way, hinges all the way outwards from the side, handle the other and hinges a few degrees inwards from the bottom, restrained by a couple of hinged metal links).

My on-campus university accomodation, I can't remember much of. My second-year off-campus house was an unmaintained ex-guesthouse with draughty and (by that point, at least) ill-fitting sash windows that often had internal ice during that autumn/ winter/early-spring (good job I like the cold!). Last time I saw it (passing through the old town, went and had a look) it had been totally renovated, though, windows, roof and all...

I'd experienced quite a wide variety of windows in Youth Hostels, from the best triple-glazing currently available in remote Scottish hostels halfway up mountain passes to shake-rattle-n-roll sashes possibly a century old in historic city-centre town-houses.

This house I currently live in had wooden double-glazing when I arrived, which wasn't too bad, but eventually I succumbed to a salesman and went for UPVC replacements (including doors). Whereas I used to have many fully (or at least side-third) opening windows, I was persuaded to choose top-light openers only, and even then only those windows on the first floor, except for the one in the ground-floor kitchen. Most of the windows, especially at ground level, do not open at all. (In case of fire, if I'm denied the usual egresses, I'm gonna have to swing something heavy against the statutory reinforced glass of whichever downstairs window I want to escape by. The installers also never left me the keys to the opening windows, so I fashioned my own 'workable' keys while I waited and waited and waited to be sent the real ones. Still waiting, technically, a decade or more later, but also technically I don't need them to arrive any more thanks to making my own 'stop gap' replacements. Which is lucky... ;) )

That possibility aside, I have never smashed a window, that I recall, either a building window or a vehicle one. But I was trained what to do if I did need to smash a window whilst in the Scouts, interestingly. And if I did it without necessity I could probably effect a temporary (weather-proof) repair, at least...

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby addams » Thu Aug 04, 2016 3:38 am UTC

BytEfLUSh wrote:Huh, panel #2 is well timed for me. Two days ago, my dad was making attempting to make french fries on a stove when suddenly, "for no reason", the cooking oil caught fire. That was the first flash of light I saw, followed by another, much brighter, presumably as my dad tried to put out the fire by pouring water on it (though he denies that) as I ran towards the kitchen. Remarkably, he was not injured at all and the only damage was the melted fire alarm as it was right above the fire. Well, the walls need repainting, too. And the wooded frame of the door was kind of badly burned. The french fries were also ruined.

Yes.
That's a great story.

People don't do much of that, anymore.
I'm glad your Dad is keeping up tradition.

svenman wrote:In Germany and many neighbouring countries, windows open inward. Modern windows usually have a clever double-hinged mechanism where you can either swing the window all the way open around a vertical axis (also makes for easy cleaning unless there's furniture in the way) or tilt it inward a little bit around a horizontal axis along the bottom of the window (easier demonstrated than explained, e. g. in this video). These also tend to have double or triple glazing and effective seals, given that winters in much of Germany can get colder than in the more populous parts of the UK.

Bug screens are however not common in Germany. Allowing bugs to come in is just generally accepted here as an unavoidable risk of opening windows during the warm parts of the year.

That clip of the window is Great!
A clip is worth a thousand words.

I think that common window design is wonderful!
I was fascinated with them at first encounter.

I've found myself holding a Large window.
It was attached by only one henge.

I was a little frightened. Big Window!
That's what I get for playing with the windows.

Screens are common in the US.
Bugs get in and can't get out.

I take many screens off.
The obstruct my view.

The North Pacific Coast does not have East Coast bug problems.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Shadowman615 » Thu Aug 04, 2016 12:55 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:
Shadowman615 wrote:aluminum frames (or aluminum, as you guys call it)


LOL, I meant "aluminium, as you guys call it." Maybe blame that one on autocorrect.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Neil_Boekend » Thu Aug 04, 2016 1:17 pm UTC

Archgeek wrote:Notably, the aluminium-frame ones can be strange to have in a kitchen in winter -- it's always odd to see a thick frost on the latch handle as a result of sub-freezing outside temperatures and the humidity from a boiling pot of something.

That's a massive heat leak, and a common problem in old aluminium frames. The newer aluminium frames have a thermal break in them: a piece of plastic between the outer aluminium frame and the inner one. The thermal bridge problem has been solved nowadays.
This is an example of the construction of a modern aluminium frame.
Spoiler:
Image
Note that there is no direct aluminium connection between the inside and the outside

Once the heat problem was solved aluminium became pretty much the most durable window frames available.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby DanD » Thu Aug 04, 2016 2:57 pm UTC

Envelope Generator wrote:After you've gotten the windows off their hinges, can't you just set them on the floor or something instead of holding them up?


Not typically. The bottom half usually remains connected. On some, you can let the window rest downwards and it's supported, but the usual approach is "tip them in, use one hand to spray with cleaner, put down the cleaner and pick up the cleaning rag, clean, tip back up". They aren't very heavy, so it's not quite as awkward as it sounds.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby jc » Thu Aug 04, 2016 6:52 pm UTC

addams wrote:The North Pacific Coast does not have East Coast bug problems.
A Dragon Fly flew in my the kitchen window and made me scream.


Yeah, I grew up there, and everywhere I've lived since has had much more serious bug problems than I remember back then. So how did the dragon fly make you scream? I've always found that, if I slowly hold a finger out, I can often get them to land. They're cute little critters (although they are vicious carnivores if you're a fly or mosquito), and they often have pretty designs all over their bodies and wings. I'll then usually walk them outside slowly, if I don't startle them into flying. There's a lot more for them to catch and eat outside than inside, and they're really valuable for pest control.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby DanD » Thu Aug 04, 2016 8:13 pm UTC

On the no screens in Europe thing, they don't, generally, have the level of human pest insects that we do. That being said, biting flies in rural areas can be a problem, and one mosquito in your hotel room can be enough of a problem. Especially when it's in the upper 30s C, humid, and you're having enough trouble sleeping already. I was sleeping with my hotel room door open as well as the window that night. Not super safe, but it was the only way to get any air movement at all.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby J%r » Thu Aug 04, 2016 10:37 pm UTC

I live in Belgium and I have lots of bug screens, then again I live in a city that used to be a swamp. Our windows open inward too (horizontally), though we have a large living room window towards the garden/sunroom that slides open horizontally. the bathroom window tilts open however. Then we also have storm windows made from wood which we can close at night to keep the light out, or the heat when there's a heatwave.

The windows at work do have this double hinged system.

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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby addams » Fri Aug 05, 2016 3:08 am UTC

jc wrote:
addams wrote:The North Pacific Coast does not have East Coast bug problems.
A Dragon Fly flew in my the kitchen window and made me scream.


Yeah, I grew up there, and everywhere I've lived since has had much more serious bug problems than I remember back then. So how did the dragon fly make you scream? I've always found that, if I slowly hold a finger out, I can often get them to land. They're cute little critters (although they are vicious carnivores if you're a fly or mosquito), and they often have pretty designs all over their bodies and wings. I'll then usually walk them outside slowly, if I don't startle them into flying. There's a lot more for them to catch and eat outside than inside, and they're really valuable for pest control.

I screamed because he is a Big Bug.
I screamed because he surprised me.

One moment he wasn't there the next moment he Was!
I startle and scream much easier than I did in the past.

Dragon flies are a beautiful creature.
I like them, too. I did not hurt him.

As soon as I knew him as a Dragon Fly, getting him back outdoors, unharmed, became Job #1.
It was easy. I caught him in a flower vase. I held the vase outside the window. He flew away.

Yes.
The Pacific North Coast has relatively few bug problems.

It is lovely here.
Very few frosty days.
Very few mosquitos.

No Chiggers.
No Fire Ants.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby RogueCynic » Fri Aug 05, 2016 3:23 am UTC

I tried opening the windows to get fresh air but in the winter the house is freezing. Even though the thermostat is set to 90 f. I have a mixed bag of windows, some are the ones that move up and down, some move outward with a crank. The crank ones have old fashioned shutters. I like them but they need repair.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Pfhorrest » Fri Aug 05, 2016 4:02 am UTC

I never open my windows because my nearest neighbors are goddamn filthy smokers and the air outside always smells like an ash tray. I am so fucking glad I have an air conditioner now and can regulate the condition of my indoor air without having to exchange air with the outside.
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby CharlieP » Fri Aug 05, 2016 8:53 am UTC

somitomi wrote:
Grop wrote:I had forgotten that guillotin windows were popular in the US.

I find that strange too, but then I realise our windows fall out, if you move the handle while they're open. I think the reason for the different windows is more cultural than practical.

Um, what?
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Re: 1715: "Household Tips"

Postby Neil_Boekend » Fri Aug 05, 2016 9:18 am UTC

CharlieP wrote:
somitomi wrote:
Grop wrote:I had forgotten that guillotin windows were popular in the US.

I find that strange too, but then I realise our windows fall out, if you move the handle while they're open. I think the reason for the different windows is more cultural than practical.

Um, what?

Here in the Netherlands we have lots of tilt/turn windows that open inwards. You can tilt them open for a small opening or turn them open for a big opening.
here is an example:
Spoiler:
draaikiepraam_4_draaistand_www_kikmachinale_nl.jpg
Turn mode
draaikiepraam_4_draaistand_www_kikmachinale_nl.jpg (10.37 KiB) Viewed 5160 times
draaikiepraam_5_kantelstand_www_kikmachinale_nl.jpg
Tilt mode
draaikiepraam_5_kantelstand_www_kikmachinale_nl.jpg (9.78 KiB) Viewed 5160 times

There are 3 hinges in these: 1 tilt+ turn (bottom left side), 1 turn (top left) and 1 tilt (bottom right).
If you tilt then the turn hinge is disconnected, as in the moving inner frame of the window is no longer connected to the stationary outer frame by that hinge.
If you turn then the tilt hinge is disconnected.
The tilt/turn hinge is always connected.
The mode is selected by the rotation of the handle: 1 position is "window locked", one is "tilt" and one is "turn"
Old versions lacked the interlocks that prevented the handle from moving to "tilt" while the window was turned open, and vice versa.

This resulted in the possibility to disconnect all hinges except for one (tilt+turn). If you accidentally did that the forces on the tilt/turn hinge would be immense. It never happened to me but if you were to let go of the handle I think there is a distinct possibility that the hinge would be torn from either frame or apart.
Now if the windows open outward instead of inward I see a risk of having a window tumbling down a 5 story building. I have never seen them open outwards, but that may be due to Dutch building code.
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