URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

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URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby Burr » Thu Dec 30, 2010 8:03 am UTC

Hello, all you wonderful people of the xkcd forums!

I'm sorry to come into this community with a request, before I have a chance to give some of myself to you all. But I'm afraid time is running short for me and my mind is too tied up to think right anymore. I know, I make it sound like I have terminal cancer or something tragic. No, my problem is far less fatal, though from my perspective, it may as well be so, for it turned me into a ranting, braindead introvert.

I need advice. I need help figuring out where I should apply to for undergrad. I'm in my senior year of high school right now. My problem is that I've got so many interests and pursuits, that I do not know what studies I should pursue.

I've applied to MIT as EA and was deferred to Regular Action. I have high hopes about it, but I can't stand living in limbo. I've been accepted to Indiana University. It's a good school, big campus, many opprotunities, many experiences, exposure to all sorts of people and all sorts of academic pursuits. Not to mention "affordable." But I'm rather ambitious, I want to reach for something greater.

I've filled out the Common App. I need to know what colleges I should send it to. I've got two days left to decide. I know. It's terrible and irresponcible and it speaks ill of me. But I've been thinking about this for months, and I'm getting nowhere. I need advice. Advice from people who've been there and done that... but who haven't yet forgotten what it's like to be young and full of dreams.

I know it's a very vague question, but I truly will be eternally grateful if you can put my mind to rest over this matter, one way or another.

I'll tell you a little about myself. Please, share the holiday spirit and give a little of your evening time to help me overcome my dilema. Brew some tea, put on some music and give this post a good read.

I'm an indie game dev to the bone. I've been making games in one form or another ever since I was ten. I love everything about it. Absolutely everything: creative expression, problem solving, self-drive, and all the wonderful people I get to work with. Even bitter failure has it's own lessons.

Here's a small showcase of my work: http://robosquid.com/burr/

Started with Game Maker, worked my way to Java, then to C# with XNA. Learned all sorts of web dev along the way: PHP, AJAX, CSS, SQL db techniques. I know how to solve my problems with code but I'd love to learn more of the theory behind it all. What little I've learned of abstraction and types of programming paradigms makes me interested in pursuing a Computer Science degree. But I'm kinda afraid of becoming "the computer guy" and getting stuck doing IT support or network management for some business for a decade. That would be quite boring to say the least. Sure, it'll pay the bills, but... I'm hoping to work and study my way into academia, or a national lab, or the digital entertainment industry. Would any CS majors here be kind enough to tell how it all worked out for them? :D

Also, our school doesn't teach CS classes, but I took an intro level Java course last year at Indiana University, through our school. It was boring and predictable. Intro level. My second semester grade came from a single game I designed, illustrated, and programmed. So while I like CS, I have no idea how interesting a major it would make. Again... please... advise? :(

Learned to draw, to concept art and to sprite. I've been born with some talent, and I've been doodling since I could hold a pencil. I've taken one intro-level art elective in 9th grade, but it wasn't terribly challenging. Slept through most of it, yet finished with nearly a perfect grade. Although I love art and might get a job related to my art skills, pursuing it as a college major does not appeal to me. It doesn't seem practical enough. Any art or media majors out there? :)

I love to write. I do a lot of storytelling, character development, and world building as part of game dev. But that sort of writing tends to be gimicky and larger than life, so writing for writing's sake is a fairly new interest of mine. I love reading speculative sci-fi, as well as classical philosophical texts and modern "popular science" books (e.g. Jared Diamond's Guns Germs and Steel). I might undertake writing sci-fi short stories and seeking publishing opprotunities. But I doubt it's something I could learn at college. I'll take a couple creative writing courses, maybe join a writing club and build connections. The most I can hope for is to attend an interesting institution and build up life experiences to draw on for inspiration. Am I right? Any published writers out there? Please, lend me your words.

As for my studies: I'm going for the IB Diploma. By the time I graduate, I'll have taken the equivalent of eight years of high school science, all of it Honors or AP. I have no idea how that happened. In retrospect, I should have spent more time in the performing arts. By the end of it all, I've grown rather disinterested with all sciences I've encountered in my limited experience. Anatomy is so far my favourite, and I'm rather interested in genetics, since I see it as biological kin to programming. Anyone got any science field recommendations for me? Good schools for genetics? I heard Chicago has a good genetics grad program. I like psychology but there's too many psych grads nowadays, right? I like studying history for the same reasons I like psych: helps me see how people tick and provides material for my writing. But I don't want to major in it and end up an archivist in some dusty museum.

I strongly dislike being taught math at the high school level. The lectures are dreary and the teachers are depressing. But I love the moments when you are working on a problem set and suddently understanding dawns on you. You suddenly see how all the pieces connect, and you know you'll be able to solve any problem related to those math concepts. Grokin' it. Does it get any better after high school?

I'm strangely drawn to anthropology and archeology. Cultural anthropology seems to combine history, psychology and statistics into an interesting package. Plus, there's the implied promise of travel and field work. I've come to the USA from Ukraine. I loved the culture shock, and I've been filled with wanderlust ever since. You could say my game dev and world building is my way of coping with that wanderlust while I'm tied down by family and studies. Plus, I got to work with people from all over the world which is pretty sweet. Norway, Australia, South Africa, India, the Philipines. They all got such amazing stories to tell!

There's just so many amazing things to do in life! So many goals to reach! But I have no idea what I want to do in life. I'm afraid of limiting myself. But if I don't decide on an engaging college now, I'm gonna dread the next four years. So please, dear members of the xkcd community: help me. Put my mind to rest. Tell me what colleges I should look at and what majors I should pursue.

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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby Bakemaster » Thu Dec 30, 2010 5:27 pm UTC

The only limitations to the number of applications you can send out are time and money. You're pretty short on time, but the Common App helps there (while somewhat limiting your choices). How about money? If that's not particularly tight, go ahead and apply to fifteen or twenty schools.

Nobody here can tell you what to major in. Or, put another way, no advice which comes in the form, "You should major in X because Y" can be trustworthy when it comes from complete strangers.

You mentioned your ambition in the context of better and worse institutions to attend. Keep in mind that there are particular reasons that institutions become prestigious, and that the prestige of one school may represent some resource or strength which is of no use or interest to you. There are those who believe prestige eventually becomes self-perpetuating; that many prestigious schools no longer deserve their reputation because they no longer offer an exceptional college experience. You've probably been told before that college, life, or opportunity is only what you make of it—that you only ever get out what you put in—but though you may believe this in an intellectual sense, as a high school student you may not have been able to gain the particular experiences necessary to fully understand it.

If college is only what you make of it, and if you only ever get out what you put in, what does a prestigious institution have to offer you that a less prestigious institution does not? That's an important question to answer, and luckily, it's totally possible to answer with just a little research. In general, prestigious institutions offer greater opportunities for networking with high-profile members of industry and government. They may offer a more comfortable campus lifestyle, which is important to some students and not others. They may offer some advantage on graduate applications (highly variable). They may offer more comprehensive student support services such as academic or personal counseling, health services, internship and co-op programs, etc. They may offer one or two or all or none of these things. Finally, they may offer a higher caliber of faculty or student body, a more comprehensive list of programs and major concentrations, or that one cutting-edge program that you can't find anywhere else.

The point is that they may offer one, two, all or none of these things. Probably not all or none. It's up to you to determine what your priorities are, what you desire most in an institution, and then seek out those institutions with a reputation for delivering in those particular areas. Those may be private or public institutions; they may be widely known or only locally known; they may not show up in rankings and they may not be "top-tier" or "second-tier". Try not to be distracted by the shiny aura of prestige and reputation alone. Will people be impressed if they hear you went to MIT? Yeah, sure. Will they hire you for the job you want, buy the product you produce, partner with you on the project you're trying to get off the ground, or do any of the things that will actually matter in your adult life, based on that fleeting impression? No. Nine of out ten times, the recent graduate from Small Specialized College whose resume shows a body of ambitious work with any measure of success during college will be purchased from, partnered with, or hired over the recent graduate from MIT with nothing but a glossy piece of paper. The rest of the time, unless the MIT guy is some crazy, one-in-100-million genius, it was probably a poor management decision to hire him, and you don't want to work for someone who makes poor management decisions if you can avoid it.

This is not me telling you, "Don't go to MIT." This is me telling you that you don't need to go to MIT, and it's possible you would find greater success at a smaller or less prestigious school. That being said, it seems important to you to keep your options open; to find a school which offers more than one rigorous, engaging area of study in case you end up going in a different direction. MIT has a lot to offer beyond natural sciences and engineering, but if you don't get into MIT, an institute of technology may not be for you. Focus on schools that have well-developed programs in both the sciences and humanities. You can tell when a program is developed in a general sense by looking at the number of majors offered in that area, the size of the department, number of faculty, how many of them are full-time and researching in the field. You haven't mentioned engineering, so it may be that the big engineering schools don't quite align with your interests, having devoted a large portion of their resources to engineering programs.

I'll throw you a bone by tossing out one institution to consider. Northeastern University is a great choice for students who want to work during college; it has one of the most developed internship/co-op programs in the country. If you want to be sure that a field is for you, there's no better way than to take it for a test drive. I recommend you search for a few institutions with similarly developed internship/co-op programs, as well as strengths in the applied sciences and humanities, and send in applications. Remember the general rule that an institution particularly known for one area, such as engineering, will tend to provide the most funding and the greatest resources to that one program, since that's how they market themselves.

The best way to find out about good schools that aren't necessarily well-known is to talk to academics and professionals in your field of interest. They're the people who are likely to have met the students who found success in that field, regardless of their alma mater. On the internet you're going to get a lot of recommendations pulled straight from Google-able rankings and top ten lists, and a lot of one-off, "I had success at X" recommendations which are not statistically significant, to say the least. Unfortunately, you don't have time for that at the moment, so you should do what research you can, apply to a bunch of schools, and then go out and ask academics and professionals about the list of schools where you applied. Even if you missed a school that you find out sounds really awesome, transfer is always an option; or, you could take a gap year and work on your game development projects while you do more research. If you're good at being self-motivated, a gap year can be wonderfully productive. It can also provide an opportunity to strike out on your own and make some of the necessary mistakes involved in that transition between living at home in high school and being fully independent; if you're not enrolled in classes, it's a lot harder to screw up your education via an awkward or over-enthusiastic introduction to a new lifestyle.

OOPS: I just took a tour of your portfolio, and I'm getting a strong impression of how important it is to you to be involved in a multi-faceted creative process. I would recommend considering as one of your priorities an institution that encourages and supports interdisciplinary study and self-designed majors. Keep in mind that most schools will claim this as a strength to some degree, and you'll have to look beyond their marketing. Download handbooks and catalogs when possible, as they often detail the process by which a student can design their own major and the resources and support systems in place for such a course of study; this will tell you more than the institution's website, which is mostly a marketing tool.
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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby nyeguy » Thu Dec 30, 2010 11:12 pm UTC

If you love game development, and are interested in MIT, I highly recommend you apply to Carnegie Mellon. From my experience, the kinds of students here are basically the same kind of quirky/nerdy/awesome people who go to schools like MIT. And if you love game design, we have excellent programs in CS as well as art and design, so you would have the opportunity to explore in all sorts of directions. Interdisciplinary study is highly encouraged, and it sounds like that is a plus for you.

As for options, while we are most well known as a technical school (esp. for CS), our arts programs are top notch, and our humanities school is extraordinarily good as well. You definitely are the caliber candidate which shouldn't have a problem getting in. Technically you have to apply to each college in the school, but CS students have the hardest admissions standards, so if you start there and decide you don't like it, switching to a different school would not be a problem.

Just FYI, if its like last year you have to do a supplement essay about why you are interested in the school, but that should be easy with your game dev passion. I think it is definitely worth your time; I love it here, and I bet you would too.
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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby ahazaq2 » Fri Dec 31, 2010 2:48 am UTC

I don't know good schools you should try, but some schools have additional essays on their supplements. START NOW.

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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby cjmcjmcjmcjm » Fri Dec 31, 2010 6:38 am UTC

Re: not going to MIT
According to my aunt, chemistry prof (and MIT grad), at Hamilton U, if you are fairly certain that you are going to grad school, it might make sense to go to a smaller school that is still respected in the field for undergrad and then apply to MIT (or whatever has the best program) for grad school. The important thing is to build up research/portfolio while an undergrad, because that will help you in both grad school apps and the "real world". Sometimes, that is easier to accomplish at a smaller school due to less competition from your classmates and grad students for the professor's research time
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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby Burr » Sat Jan 01, 2011 2:46 am UTC

@Nyeguy:
That is at least the fifth time someone mentioned CMU to me. For one, the original admin of the game dev community I used to hang out at now goes to CMU. Afeique Sheikh, maybe you know each other?

I'm definitely applying to CMU. Already drafted their essay (yes, they did have one this year) and I'll submit tonight or tomorrow morning. But I'm a little worried about the small school size. Do you feel it limits your opprotunities for research or getting in touch with prominent people in the field? Thought going off what cjm said, going to a small but reputable college as an undergrad would expand your opprotunities, not limit them.

Or rather to tell the truth, my father is more worried than me when it comes to school prominence/prestige. He's a nuclear physicist researcher at IU Bloomington, and while he knows everything there's to know about majoring in physics, he's rather clueless about CS, the arts, and the humanities. (He studied in Ukraine.) So school prominence is a fairly core factor by which he bases his opinions. Hell, he thought CMU was a community college. I'll have to pull up some materials later on to convince him that it's a great choice for CS major. It's not necessary or urgent, but if you have any such materials for me, I'd gladly take them into account.

I will most certainly build up a portofilo. Not sure what sorts of opprotunities I'll go for yet, but I'll keep busy. Love CS stuff.

@Bakemaster:
Thank you for a wonderfully instructive and expedient reply. I've read it over and over yesterday, and thought upon it for some time. I don't have a specific responce, but I wanted to note that going for a self-designed major never occured to me before. But it makes sense, somehow. If anything, that bit of advice pushed me more towards Indiana University. They have a self-designed major program which seems fairly solid. But I'm not sure what I should be looking for when I look at handbooks and cataloges - there's so many class & level specifications I don't intuitively understand. That's allright though - I'll take a more indepth look at it all after break's over. Thank you!

I'm afraid a gap year isn't an option for me. My father, again. Though I may be living separately at that point, I don't want to loose his respect over such a disagreement. Besides, I've already sent out all the applications and what not. So may as well go through with it. But I see your point.

I really know nothing about engineering. Our school didn't offer an AP engineering curriculum so I never looked at it, for I was engaged elsewhere.

The main reason I wanted to go to IU is because it is so multifaceted in the majors and education it offers. So it goes along with the "important to keep options open" aspect. Though if I was to take as indepth a look at every school I hear of, perhaps I'll find that most of them are just as well-developed.

Thank you for the "college is only what you make of it" talk. It helped. I'll keep it all in mind as I look at other schools.

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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby nyeguy » Sat Jan 01, 2011 3:09 am UTC

Burr wrote:@Nyeguy:
That is at least the fifth time someone mentioned CMU to me. For one, the original admin of the game dev community I used to hang out at now goes to CMU. Afeique Sheikh, maybe you know each other?

I'm definitely applying to CMU. Already drafted their essay (yes, they did have one this year) and I'll submit tonight or tomorrow morning. But I'm a little worried about the small school size. Do you feel it limits your opprotunities for research or getting in touch with prominent people in the field? Thought going off what cjm said, going to a small but reputable college as an undergrad would expand your opprotunities, not limit them.

Or rather to tell the truth, my father is more worried than me when it comes to school prominence/prestige. He's a nuclear physicist researcher at IU Bloomington, and while he knows everything there's to know about majoring in physics, he's rather clueless about CS, the arts, and the humanities. (He studied in Ukraine.) So school prominence is a fairly core factor by which he bases his opinions. Hell, he thought CMU was a community college. I'll have to pull up some materials later on to convince him that it's a great choice for CS major. It's not necessary or urgent, but if you have any such materials for me, I'd gladly take them into account.

I will most certainly build up a portofilo. Not sure what sorts of opprotunities I'll go for yet, but I'll keep busy. Love CS stuff.

I don't think prestige is a problem. Trust me, a lot of people I talked to didn't really know about the school, but among the people who matter, CMU has very well known. And we rank very well... I would show your father the rankings page that CMU maintains. As for research, the small school does not limit research opportunities at all, and we have so many prominent faculty that you can't help but run into great minds. A bunch of freshmen in my programming course got the chance to work on projects for the same guys that did ReCAPTCHA. It is basically expected that at some point during your stay you do some sort of research of your own; to not do so is abnormal. Hope this helps!
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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby Bakemaster » Sat Jan 01, 2011 6:22 pm UTC

Yeah, if necessary, I'm sure there are tons of people at IU who could tell your father what an excellent school CMU is for CS. Actually, I can't believe I didn't think of it before—there's a user on this forum who I believe is a CMU grad, and works in a pretty fascinating and innovative field, designing interactive game-like experiences... He could explain it far better than I could, I'm sure. (Summoning sparkyb to the thread! The power of Bake compels you!)
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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby Angua » Sat Jan 01, 2011 7:28 pm UTC

cjmcjmcjmcjm wrote:Re: not going to MIT
According to my aunt, chemistry prof (and MIT grad), at Hamilton U, if you are fairly certain that you are going to grad school, it might make sense to go to a smaller school that is still respected in the field for undergrad and then apply to MIT (or whatever has the best program) for grad school. The important thing is to build up research/portfolio while an undergrad, because that will help you in both grad school apps and the "real world". Sometimes, that is easier to accomplish at a smaller school due to less competition from your classmates and grad students for the professor's research time
My brother got the same advice (he's definitely going to be going to be doing a physics PhD) and so went to Clemson which is quite small and it seems to be working for him, as he gets on with his professors, helps out in the labs and worked in the summer helping doing research, all of which will be good for helping him to get the references and qualifications to go where he wants for his PhD.
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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby sparkyb » Sat Jan 01, 2011 10:25 pm UTC

Bakemaster wrote:Yeah, if necessary, I'm sure there are tons of people at IU who could tell your father what an excellent school CMU is for CS. Actually, I can't believe I didn't think of it before—there's a user on this forum who I believe is a CMU grad, and works in a pretty fascinating and innovative field, designing interactive game-like experiences... He could explain it far better than I could, I'm sure. (Summoning sparkyb to the thread! The power of Bake compels you!)


Apparently I have been summoned to this thread. Yes, what Bakey says is true. I'm a CMU grad (both undergrad and masters). I really don't think I could have been happier there. Probably not exactly in the same way as you, but I was also very interested in something combining technology and entertainment. Somewhat like you I spent a lot of my time in High School doing more computer things than art, despite having an interest in theater production. I ended up going to Carnegie Mellon as a drama student originally but transferring to Computer Science after a year. When I got there I learned about the Entertainment Techonlogy Center (ETC) masters program which was brand new at the time. As an undergrad I went looking for a way to involve myself in that work. I met with Randy Pausch (of Last Lecture fame now) who was one of the founding co-directors of the program and ended up spending 3 years or so working in his virtual reality research group. Having spent all that time at CMU already, I decided to go to MIT instead for graduate school, but after a year decided I still greatly preferred CMU, switched back to the ETC and got my masters in entertainment technology. After that I worked both independently and for a few small studios making motion-based games for places like museums and theme parks. When the recession started to make those freelance jobs a little harder to find, I took a full time job at Harmonix, makers of Guitar Hero, Rock Band, and Dance Central.

So now that you know my background, here's a few things that relate to this conversation.

1) Both my parents went to MIT and so there was a strong push to go there. Particularly when I was at MIT and I was planning to drop out of that full-funded grad program to go to a rather expensive one at CMU my mom had a pretty hard time understanding why I wanted to do that. She thought that even if it wasn't totally what I wanted to be doing that the MIT name was worth finish that program. I'm not sure why CMU isn't more widely known, but I think among people who do know of it, it has about as good a reputation as you can have. And people in the right fields do know it. I showed my mom some articles (I can see if I can still dig stuff up but it's kind of old at this point) that showed how good a school it is, and especially after seeing what I've done she understands why I did the right thing. The ETC program was the first of its kind and there are many copies now. At the time I was there Electronic Arts (at the time the biggest video game publisher) hired on average 40% of our graduating class and looked to us as the model of video game development academic programs, and I have lots of friends at a lot of other big entertainment companies too, and many who have started their own successful studios. The CS department is regularly ranked at the very top of rankings along with MIT and Berkley.

2) As far as size goes, I never really felt like CMU was that small. It may be on the small side but there's still a lot there. And I'd say that it is dense. It might not have quite as many majors as some schools (for instance, for a very strong engineering school with top not EE, CE, MechE, and biomed programs, there's absolutely no aerospace engineering), but generally it excels at a lot of the ones that it has. I never really felt there was anything I was missing. There were lots of opportunities to take great classes, work on amazing projects, and do research. Also, one thing I found is that some of the most parts of college do not happen in the classroom or any academic setting. There are lots of clubs that do some pretty amazing things. Since I have left the Game Development Society has really taken off and is a great way to get some good projects in your portfolio and to learn from your peers. For me it was building spring carnival booths with student organizations that helped me figure out what I wanted to do with my life.

3) If it is interdisciplinary work that you're interested in, and it seems like you are, then I can think of no better place. In addition to top notch CS and engineering programs, the fine arts programs are all very highly regarded, especially the drama department whose alumni run a lot of Hollywood. What I loved is that the university really did care about bringing these people together (something I feel is missing at MIT). The ETC was created because professors from drama and CS came together. The research lab I was in was a mix of programmers and artists. Through that work I had several great friends in the art program and some of the more interesting projects I did in school were ones that I collaborated with them (we even did a technology-art show at the student run art gallery). If you're interested in making games (or really anything in entertainment) I can't stress enough the importance of learning to work well with people in different disciplines. It's really not about learning how to do all the art and design and programming and audio yourself. It is learning how to do one things really well and learning how to find and work with the experts at the others.

4) If you do have interests that span departments though, CMU is pretty good for mixing and matching majors or creating your own. They have several programs (a Bachelors of Humanities and Arts, Bachelors of Science and Arts, Science and Humanities Scholars, etc) that allow you to combine two majors from different colleges at the university. I also know at least a few people who worked with the school to design their own majors, like a good friend of mine who made up his own Themed Entertainment Design major.

Ok, so I think I've said enough about that. Obviously I think it's a great school even though I'm biased. However, you already said you were planning to apply there and more about schools you already applied to wasn't really what you asked. Bakemaster asked me to chime in about a topic I like talking about, so I did, but if you do want to know more about it or you need ammo convincing others, I'm happy to help. That may be more useful when it comes to deciding time than applying time.

In general, I'd say, don't stress out so much. I think having the right school matters a lot more for grad school when you already know the very specific subfield you're going into and want those experts. For undergrad, just find a place you'll be happy spending the next four years.

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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby Burr » Mon Jan 03, 2011 1:08 am UTC

Thank you all, especially sparkyb for the great CMU information. I've applied to CMU. Carnegie sounds wonderful - a great CS school and celebrates interdisciplinary pursuits. But I got so much crap from my dad for applying that I'm through with college apps. Being strong-armed into going to IU by the looks of it. He's asking questions I can't answer yet, about housing plans, about admissions costs, about cost of living in Pittsburg / Campbridge. I feel like he wants me to go the safest route, to the school he knows the most about, and by that virtue alone, Indiana University seems less and less appealing to me by the day. Bah! But I'm sure many of yall have gone through crap like this already, so you don't need to hear me yammering on about it. Suffice to say that I'm gonna have to jump right into studying up on financial aid / student loans options for Carnegie, MIT, and IU. Thank you so much for your advice, again. All of you. Have a happy new year. May all your plans find smashing success.

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Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby Bakemaster » Mon Jan 03, 2011 1:20 am UTC

If you have questions about the FAFSA, federal grants and loans, or the aid process in general, feel free to send me a private message. I worked for some time in financial aid. Some things are always unique to the college in question, but many other things are universal.
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Burr
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Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 1:49 am UTC

Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby Burr » Mon Jan 03, 2011 1:34 am UTC

Thank you, Bakemaster. You're too kind. :)

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TheLonelyGod
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2011 4:18 pm UTC

Re: URGENT! Desperately Need Advice for College Choice

Postby TheLonelyGod » Wed Jan 19, 2011 4:56 pm UTC

I can totally Second Everything sparkyb says about CMU. I ended up spending 2 semesters there and totally loved it. If it wasn't for the extremely High Cost I'd still be there right now. There CS Department is amazing (and the building dedicated just to CS is gorgeous) and the people who work at the ETC are fantastically friendly.

If you get in and can afford it you should totally go there.


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