Recipe requests

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Recipe requests

Postby Zohar » Fri May 22, 2015 12:12 am UTC

I'm surprised we don't have a thread like this. Or, at least, I couldn't find one...

I'm having some friends over on Saturday for a Eurovision party, and I want to make some Austrian food, since it's in Austria. I decided I'll make two sweet dishes - Kaiserschmarrn (and I have a recipe for that) and Linzer torte. Does anyone have a good recipe for it? Does anyone have recommendations for other interesting Austrian vegetarian recipes?
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby dubsola » Tue Jun 30, 2015 4:17 am UTC

Since this has already happened, I don't feel bad in saying I do not have any such recipes.

I would now like to humbly ask for any nice vegetarian stew recipes.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Jun 30, 2015 4:45 am UTC

Chickpea and sweet potato curry
For two-three people
1 large sweet potato, peeled and cut in chunks.
1 24 oz or so can of chickpeas
1 onion, chopped-about 4 oz
2 14 oz cans of coconut milk
2 T Curry powder
Minced garlic
Minced ginger root
Drain and rinse the chickpeas
Saute the onion in a little oil until it starts to brown. Add the sweet potato, garlic, ginger root and chickpeas to the pot. Add the curry powder and stir, cooking until it's all aromatic.
Add the coconut milk. If there isn't enough liquid to cover, add some water.
Cover and simmer for about 1/2 hour, or until potatoes are soft. Adjust seasoning-you will probably want more salt.

If you like, chunks of peeled eggplant go well in this too, so do mushrooms. I like straw mushrooms. Fried tofu cubes can be used if you want loads of protein.
If you want to get fancy, instead of the curry powder, put about 2T of oil in the pot. Add 1t mustard seeds and heat until they begin to pop. Add some turmeric, cumin, cinnamon and black pepper. Fry for a minute on moderate heat, then add the rest of the ingredients. If you like your curries hot, add some minced Serrano peppers and a bit of cayenne.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Zohar » Tue Jun 30, 2015 1:08 pm UTC

Sounds great PAstry, I should try that!

My usual method of making sure a veggie "European" stew is delicious is:
1. Use lots of garlic, celery onions and carrots at the start.
2. Add roots - celery roots, parsley roots...
3. Use a good vegetable stock - we collect most of out vegetable peels (onions, garlic, carrots, celery, mushrooms, herb leftovers etc., but not cabbage, broccoli or cauliflower) and put them in a ziplock bag in the freezer, then when it's full we just cook it in boiling water for an hour or so and use that as stock (and freeze what we don't use). It's a great base for any sauces, soups, etc.
4. To add nice flavor and texture you can use mushrooms (dried mushrooms pack a big punch), prunes, lentils or beans.
5. If you're into that, use alcohol when cooking - wine or beer.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby dubsola » Wed Jul 01, 2015 5:21 am UTC

Thankyou Zohar. I kind of knew that stuff already but it's good to have confirmation that I'm on the right track.

Thanks, PAstrychef - I was more interested in a European style stew, but that curry looks pretty delish.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Nath » Wed Jul 01, 2015 8:24 am UTC

Well, as European vegetable stews go, it's hard to beat a good ratatouille. Saute onions, green bell peppers, zucchini, and eggplant, in olive oil. Ideally, you want to do the first two in a separate skillet from the others, or do them one after the other, because the latter two vegetables will release quite a bit of water. But you can get away with doing it all in one big wok. When the vegetables are somewhat browned but still a bit crisp, add some finely chopped garlic. Before the garlic browns, add tomatoes, a splash of water or stock, and optionally your herbs of choice (basil, thyme, bay leaves, and/or parsley would work here). Season with salt and pepper. Cook until the vegetables reach your desired tenderness. Optionally, add additional basil and/or parsley. Can be served hot or cold; if cold, try it with a generous drizzle of good olive oil and some good black olives, or eat it on garlic-rubbed toast. If hot, try it as a pasta sauce, or with some crusty bread. A similar Sicilian dish is caponata, which omits the peppers and zucchini, and adds celery, olives, anchovies, and capers.

Another nice European stew is a simple mushroom ragout. I think I remember typing it out at some point, but the short version is: sweat some sliced, salted mushrooms in butter until they release some water. Keep cooking until the water evaporates and the mushrooms start to brown. Remove from pan. Sweat some finely chopped shallots in butter in the same pan, with salt and pepper. Deglaze with a splash of dry vermouth or wine and put your mushrooms back in. Add thyme if you want. Reduce for a while, and add optionally add a splash of stock or water. Add a bit of creme fraiche, or regular cream, and bring it to the edge of a simmer. Turn off the heat and vigorously stir in a pat of cold butter to emulsify. Test seasoning, and finish with a bit of parsley or chives. This is good warm on garlic-rubbed toast, or on top of roast/sauteed/grilled chicken or steak.

If you're interested in another curry, I could type up a rajma masala (spiced kidney beans) recipe. It's a bit similar to PAstrychef's, but, you know, Indianner.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby pkcommando » Wed Jul 01, 2015 10:50 am UTC

I'd almost certainly end up adding chicken, but I will be definitely be making that curry sometime soon.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Wed Jul 15, 2015 5:57 pm UTC

Anything with nectarines?

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Zohar » Wed Jul 15, 2015 5:59 pm UTC

Roast them on a grill/in the oven? A pie or cobbler?
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Wed Jul 15, 2015 6:07 pm UTC

Roasted is definitely a possibility - never had that before. Pie seems like a lot of effort (I'm asking because they need eating today or tomorrow).

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Zohar » Wed Jul 15, 2015 6:10 pm UTC

Well if they're really ripe you could just make them into a jam/preserves using the usual method (lots of nectarines, some lemon juice, lots of sugar, maybe a bit of water I suppose). If they're too soft I don't know if they'll roast well.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby PAstrychef » Wed Jul 15, 2015 9:38 pm UTC

Peel them, cook them with a bit of sugar and some booze of your choice and add them to ice cream.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Wed Jul 15, 2015 9:45 pm UTC

PAstrychef wrote:Peel them, cook them with a bit of sugar and some booze of your choice and add them to ice cream.

Interesting suggestion - I decided I'm going to add them to the mango in this recipe: http://hostthetoast.com/coconut-milk-ic ... ent-310067

But both the mango and the nectarines need eating (and some selective chopping to remove some... overripe parts) so I've frozen them for now.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby poxic » Wed Jul 15, 2015 11:18 pm UTC

Ooh, I use defrosted mango and other fruit pieces as part of the liquid when making muffins.

1. Buy an assload of mangos/other at a sale
2. Peel and chop when it's all ripe
3. Put 1/2 to 3/4 cup at a time onto plastic wrap squares, fold up and make kinda flat (helps with defrosting)
4. Freeeeeeze
5. Decide to make muffins/quickbread/cake/whatevs
6. Defrost one of the flatfruits for each ~1 cup of liquid required
7. Put now-defrosted goop into measuring cup, add water/milk/juice up to required amount of liquid, blenderize, add to other ingredients.

You can decrease the sugar slightly in the recipe, depending on the sweetness of the fruit. Makes for nicely moist, slightly fruitier-tasting baked goods.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Angua » Fri Jul 17, 2015 6:00 pm UTC

Anyone here have any experience making pork rinds/pork scratchings? My brother will actually eat them (he needs all the calories he can get), and you can't buy them at home :(
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Mon Jul 20, 2015 1:08 pm UTC

Rub with salt and roast them at about 220 C for 20 minutes.

Don't think there's much more to it.

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What would people recommend to go alongside falafel and lamb burgers? I feel like I need a sauce. Chilli would be my go-to, but I'm willing to experiment with something else.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Zohar » Mon Jul 20, 2015 1:26 pm UTC

roband wrote:What would people recommend to go alongside falafel and lamb burgers? I feel like I need a sauce. Chilli would be my go-to, but I'm willing to experiment with something else.

Well I would say tahini or humus but I think you mentioned you don't like those very much. How about Ezme (we just call it "Turkish Salad" in Israel)1,2, or some Greek-style yogurt-based sauce with garlic and herbs?

1I have not personally made this recipe, so I can't vouch for it, but it seems to have the right ingredients.
2Tahini and humus would work well with it, too.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby PAstrychef » Mon Jul 20, 2015 1:34 pm UTC

Taziki, a yogurt and cucumber sauce with dill would be nice.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Mon Jul 20, 2015 1:38 pm UTC

Zohar wrote:
roband wrote:What would people recommend to go alongside falafel and lamb burgers? I feel like I need a sauce. Chilli would be my go-to, but I'm willing to experiment with something else.

Well I would say tahini or humus but I think you mentioned you don't like those very much. How about Ezme (we just call it "Turkish Salad" in Israel)1,2, or some Greek-style yogurt-based sauce with garlic and herbs?

1I have not personally made this recipe, so I can't vouch for it, but it seems to have the right ingredients.
2Tahini and humus would work well with it, too.

One day I'll get over myself and try hummus and probably love it. As it is, that day won't be today. I also don't think I've got a blender that'll get the chickpeas smooth enough.

Ezme looks to be right up my street. Tomatoes, onions and chilli peppers with lemon juice? I'm sold. Thanks for the tip - I had a suspicion I should've come directly to you! :P

PAstrychef wrote:Taziki, a yogurt and cucumber sauce with dill would be nice.

I don't love creamy sauces, but this was certainly in my mind. I need to buy some yoghurt to make flatbreads, so perhaps I'll save some at that point and try it.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Bakemaster » Tue Jul 21, 2015 4:42 am UTC

roband wrote:Anything with nectarines?

Late to the party, but I had a nectarine that needed eating today. I halved it and quartered the halves, then did the same with an heirloom tomato and arranged them alternating around the rim of a bowl with a bit of salad in the middle, a few pieces of brie on top, some pepper and olive oil. I would definitely recommend a more forward salad green or even just a little bit of fresh basil, or if you like me have only some spinach available, a little squeeze of lemon along with the olive oil.

But really when you have a ripe, in-season stone fruit, it seems a shame to do much of anything to it other than stuff it in your face. Unless of course you're processing a tree's worth. The season of the peach is the best season.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Shro » Tue Jul 21, 2015 7:16 pm UTC

roband wrote:
PAstrychef wrote:Taziki, a yogurt and cucumber sauce with dill would be nice.

I don't love creamy sauces, but this was certainly in my mind. I need to buy some yoghurt to make flatbreads, so perhaps I'll save some at that point and try it.

Raita is a very similar type of yogurt sauce. It was usually a bit of cucumber, tomato and red onion in yogurt with cilantro or mint and a bit of cumin and/or coriander with optional sugar and asofoetida to round it out.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Tue Jul 21, 2015 10:25 pm UTC

Sounds good. I think I'd end up making it light on yoghurt and heavy on everything else though!

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Shro » Tue Jul 21, 2015 11:14 pm UTC

I've ended up doing this as well. Giving the ingredients a very rough chop and putting only enough yogurt so it holds together a bit. I jokingly referred to it as "deconstructed raita" because usually deconstructed ends up as a synonym for "I was too lazy to put this together the way it was supposed to be put together".
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Thu Jul 23, 2015 4:03 pm UTC

Things to rub on a chicken before roasting it?

Oil/rosemary is too obvious. I used pesto last week. I'd like to try something else.

Considering an Indian blend of spices, maybe even Thai? Unless someone can suggest something better.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby pkcommando » Thu Jul 23, 2015 6:03 pm UTC

It's not particularly adventurous, but McCormick's makes a salt-free Garlic & Herb seasoning that works on (almost) everything. My mother used it on her London Broil, I use it in rice, on chicken, in pasta & potato salads, on pork chops, and even in egg dishes.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby freezeblade » Thu Jul 23, 2015 6:22 pm UTC

roband wrote:Things to rub on a chicken before roasting it?

Oil/rosemary is too obvious. I used pesto last week. I'd like to try something else.

Considering an Indian blend of spices, maybe even Thai? Unless someone can suggest something better.


You could try an even older preperation (india spice trade times), which is interesting if you've never tried. Stuff the chicken with dried fruits (figs, aprocots, plums, cherries, raisins, currents, whatever you have), rub with butter under the skin, then on top do a mix of nutmeg (or mace), cumin, corriander (seed), cardomom, black pepper.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Fri Jul 24, 2015 8:07 am UTC

There were no replies in time (I did leave it late). I went for Indian spices as I suggested. I had a pre-mixed "Tandoori" blend of spices which I filled out with garam masala and turmeric. Added oil and lemon juice and applied liberally. It came out nicely.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Shro » Fri Jul 24, 2015 9:22 pm UTC

If you have time the next round, use those same spices and a little garlic and ginger and yogurt for a marinade and then cook with high heat. You can skewer them with bell peppers and red onions, or serve with raw red onion and cucumber and citrus in a wrap.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Fri Jul 24, 2015 10:04 pm UTC

Cheers for the tips. I'm pretty confident with Indian cooking, so I know about complimentary spices/herbs and using yoghurt too.

Did I mention up above that the reason I'm not hot on yoghurt in things is because I have a milk allergy-thing? I'm not into generally creamy things at all, so don't buy milk, cream, yoghurt etc. ever.

But yeah, I've cooked numerous indian dishes from scratch, I love a good curry so it's something I've researched a lot. Thanks for the tips though! :)

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Shro » Fri Jul 24, 2015 10:10 pm UTC

When you say milk allergy, is it an allergy or more of a lactose intolerance? I've been getting more and more lactose intolerant as I've been getting older, and the key to avoiding it for me is to go for more high fat content and fermented milk products. The acidity of the yogurt and enzymes (or something) also contributes to tenderizing the meat, and I never use more than a couple of tablespoons, just enough to hold things together. I can tolerate high fat yogurt (especially the strained greek types) much better than any other type of milk product, so I tend to try and stick with that.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Fri Jul 24, 2015 10:13 pm UTC

I've never tested it much. I adore cheese and chocolate and they're the two things I continue to eat. I have recently found lactose free cheese and that helps, so maybe lactose.

But the symptoms are weird. I eat things with milk in, I get congested, a runny nose and I sneeze. Never heard of anything like it.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Shro » Fri Jul 24, 2015 11:14 pm UTC

Actually, conventional wisdom dictates that dairy increases phlegm production... to the point where opera singers and the like will avoid it altogether. A lot of studies haven't really borne any statistically significant results vis a vis dairy and phlegm, but it could depend on the type of milk. Raw milk and raw milk products generally avoid these symptoms.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19932941
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby roband » Fri Jul 24, 2015 11:36 pm UTC

Huh. I went to the doctor's about it and they told me to clear off.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Sandry » Tue Jul 28, 2015 4:07 pm UTC

Huh. I didn't realise the singers' views on dairy weren't medically accepted.

As a singer, I can tell you I give zero shits as to whether or not doctors believe it - it is absolutely 100% a reproducible phenomenon and definitely a problem to keep in mind in terms of timing on any performance and what you eat/drink.

That said - it doesn't generally give anyone I know a runny nose, specifically. Usually the issue is just the amount of phlegm in the throat.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby AngrySquirrel » Thu Oct 06, 2016 11:47 am UTC

Not as much a request for a recipe, more like, I need to talk about this with someone who might know something about making food and see if I can get some ideas going.

Basically the dude I'm dating is making a potato/bacon-based dish when we next meet up (he got inspired by anime ok). And since the original recipe includes a red-wine sauce, which is something that gives me migraines, I've been tasked with coming up with an acceptable sauce.

So I've been thinking about this. The dish is a pretty heavy, greasy, starchy-thing. So I'm thinking I want to lighten it up a bit. Originally I was thinking mango chutney would be good enough, but that's boring and don't require much work for me so I'm thinking of something a bit more complicated. Kind of want to keep an element of mango though, cause mango is great and just the kind of thing to "lighten" up bacon/potato-stuff. I'd also want to include some manner of soya and potentially honey in it as well. But then I'd also need to get it a bit thick and not just give it a watery salty taste either. Probably there should be some lime in there as well I guess. Hmm...

Could do a standard mango, fish-soy, sweet chili dipping sauce I guess. Like the one we use for thai-shrimp, but it might be a bit overpowering considering dude is scared of things that actually taste like something. But with like...lime and coconut-milk it could work maybe?
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Zohar » Thu Oct 06, 2016 1:09 pm UTC

Replacing a red wine sauce with what you suggested is a pretty big direction change. I don't eat bacon so I don't know what it tastes like, but it sounds like you might be able to replace this with a mushroom sauce and still have something in a similar cuisine style (I just have no idea how the mango-soy-lemon thing you suggests goes with the original dish). And you could use some white wine and cream for it, too. Those would also be flavors more familiar to a western palate.

In terms of thickening up your own sauce so it doesn't end up too watery, I suggest adding some cornstarch - take some of the liquid (like quarter cup or something) aside, mix it with a little (1 tsp?) cornflour/starch until there are no lumps, then mix it back in the main sauce and it will thicken as it heats up.

If you're interested in expanding his flavor preferences, I would suggest trying to go through some Moroccan cuisine (couscous is easy!), or possibly Japanese curry?
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby PAstrychef » Thu Oct 06, 2016 1:56 pm UTC

Soy sauce, orange juice, sesame oil, garlic chili paste, honey, garlic, ginger (I use maple syrup, which might be hard for you to get). Whisk together, adjust to taste, thicken with cornstarch as described by Zohar.
I use about equal amounts of soy sauce and orange juice, 1/4 volume sesame oil and the rest to taste. I like to use garlic paste and ginger paste in this because they are so smooth.
(I know, not perfectly fresh, etc. etc. but I use so little at a time that I don't finish fresh ginger before it goes moldy)
If I need a Thai type sauce I add peanut butter and buzz it in the blender. This also makes a great marinade for chicken.
Volumes not stated because who knows how much you want to make.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby AngrySquirrel » Thu Oct 06, 2016 2:00 pm UTC

Zohar wrote:Replacing a red wine sauce with what you suggested is a pretty big direction change. I don't eat bacon so I don't know what it tastes like, but it sounds like you might be able to replace this with a mushroom sauce and still have something in a similar cuisine style (I just have no idea how the mango-soy-lemon thing you suggests goes with the original dish). And you could use some white wine and cream for it, too. Those would also be flavors more familiar to a western palate.

In terms of thickening up your own sauce so it doesn't end up too watery, I suggest adding some cornstarch - take some of the liquid (like quarter cup or something) aside, mix it with a little (1 tsp?) cornflour/starch until there are no lumps, then mix it back in the main sauce and it will thicken as it heats up.

If you're interested in expanding his flavor preferences, I would suggest trying to go through some Moroccan cuisine (couscous is easy!), or possibly Japanese curry?

Well, yea it's a big direction change, cause the initial direction was absolutely disgusting. I don't want a similar replacement to red wine-sauce, I want something completely different and preferably better.

Cream is not a choice I'd go with cause lactose intolerance, and white wine has the same "migraines from hell"-problem as red wine.

And like, two weeks ago I blew his mind by adding cheese to scrambled eggs, so I don't think he's quite ready for curry yet. Working my way there though.

PAstrychef wrote:Soy sauce, orange juice, sesame oil, garlic chili paste, honey, garlic, ginger (I use maple syrup, which might be hard for you to get) . Whisk together, adjust to taste, thicken with cornstarch as described by Zohar.
I use about equal amounts of soy sauce and orange juice, 1/4 volume sesame oil and the rest to taste. I like to use garlic paste and ginger paste in this because they are do smooth.
(I know, not perfectly fresh, etc. etc. but I use so little at a time that I don't finish fresh ginger before it goes moldy)
If I need a Thai type sauce I add peanut butter and buzz it in the blender. This also makes a great marinade for chicken.

That sounds quite good, I really want to add mango though.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Zohar » Thu Oct 06, 2016 2:23 pm UTC

Hahaha, cheese in eggs is unusual? Well, at least you have many culinary frontiers to explore!

Too bad about wine (I know some people are only bothered by red and not white). So yeah, PAstry's suggestion should work very well for a different direction in potatoes.

I can see pureed mango working with PAstry's sauce.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby PAstrychef » Fri Oct 07, 2016 2:49 am UTC

Sure, use mango instead of the orange, or just use the orange to correct the consistency.
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