Annoying words, and Words You Hate

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby teenidle » Tue Oct 01, 2013 2:13 pm UTC

trickykungfu wrote:
teenidle wrote:
trickykungfu wrote:
krogoth wrote:regardlessly

Regardless is a sufficiently good adverb.


Can you give an example of this usage? I'm imagining a sentence like "He regardless(ly) trampled my feelings," and I don't think 'regardless' is grammatical there.

"He trampled my feelings regardless"?


Ah, you mean in situations where it would replace a word like "anyway"?


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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Copper Bezel » Tue Oct 01, 2013 4:58 pm UTC

trickykungfu wrote:Ah, you mean in situations where it would replace a word like "anyway"?

There's actually a whole name for words like anyway. They're called adverbs. = )

(Yes, "he tomorrow trampled my feelings" works less well than "he thoughtlessly trampled my feelings," and you can't well have a tomorrow blue ball. But the "anyway" part of speech really is called an adverb, since it modifies verbs.)
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Oct 01, 2013 5:12 pm UTC

There are different types of adverbs, though, and they can't all go in the same places in a sentence.

Personally, as an adverb of manner I think "regardlessly" works just fine in places where "regardless" wouldn't.

He regardlessly trampled my feelings. = He did it in a manner without regard.
He trampled my feelings regardless. = He trampled my feelings anyway (despite something else).
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby trickykungfu » Tue Oct 01, 2013 5:56 pm UTC

Copper Bezel wrote:
trickykungfu wrote:Ah, you mean in situations where it would replace a word like "anyway"?

There's actually a whole name for words like anyway. They're called adverbs. = )


Well, that's tremendously unspecific--and rather useless, given that we're clearly talking about two different types of adverbial usage. As gmalivuk pointed out, there are a number of types even at the most basic level. But if you're going to call it an adverb, you're going to need to at least specify that it's a conjunctive adverb, and then maybe mention which classification framework you're working under; CGEL, for example, doesn't contain "conjunctive adverbs", instead classifying them as prepositions. I figured it'd be easier, and clearer, just to give an example.

Also, though: one could make a case that in "He trampled my feelings regardless", regardless functions as a sentence adverbial with something like "regardless of anything else" implied; my hunch is that's probably how the current dangling usage developed.

But, you know, thanks for the smug grammar lesson.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Copper Bezel » Wed Oct 02, 2013 7:55 am UTC

Sorry, I actually misread the post of yours I responded to in the first place. I mean, context-wise.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby WilliamLehnsherr » Wed Oct 02, 2013 10:57 am UTC

Here are a few words I don't like:

Throng
Punter
Wont

I can't quite explain throng and punter. I dislike wont because it never seems to flow naturally in a sentence.

Another word I dislike is destroyed, but in a specific context. Whenever an animal has to be put down because it attacked somebody, newspapers say it was "destroyed". In Australia, at least. As far as I know the reason for this is because it's a neutral word and doesn't carry any emotional weight, as opposed to put down or killed. But saying a dog was destroyed paints a very different picture in my mind. You destroy a building, or a painting. You can destroy an entire culture, even. But to destroy one particular living thing just doesn't sound right. Plus it reminds me of heavily censored superhero cartoons where the villains would always say "I am going to destroy you!"

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Eebster the Great » Thu Oct 03, 2013 12:32 am UTC

WilliamLehnsherr wrote:I dislike wont because it never seems to flow naturally in a sentence.

It also has two pronunciations, both of which are ambiguous. And its adjectival form (wonted) is a double past participle that looks like a typo. And there is no way to say it without sounding pretentious.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby krogoth » Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:49 am UTC

trickykungfu wrote:
krogoth wrote:regardlessly

Regardless is a sufficiently good adverb.


Can you give an example of this usage? I'm imagining a sentence like "He regardless(ly) trampled my feelings," and I don't think 'regardless' is grammatical there.


"The amount of people speaking English gives it credit reguardlessly, of the amount of people speaking Chinese."

On the topic of any one language becoming dominant. - no need to go off topic it was just for context of the word usage.

It just hurts my ears.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Pez Dispens3r » Mon Oct 28, 2013 1:17 pm UTC

krogoth wrote:"The amount of people speaking English gives it credit reguardlessly, of the amount of people speaking Chinese."

Is this a found quote, or one you made up? If it's not a found quote, can you find one?
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Eebster the Great » Mon Oct 28, 2013 6:04 pm UTC

krogoth wrote:
trickykungfu wrote:
krogoth wrote:regardlessly

Regardless is a sufficiently good adverb.


Can you give an example of this usage? I'm imagining a sentence like "He regardless(ly) trampled my feelings," and I don't think 'regardless' is grammatical there.


"The amount of people speaking English gives it credit reguardlessly, of the amount of people speaking Chinese."


I haven't heard this word myself, but in this case the extraneous comma bugs me just as much as the awkward word.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Mon Oct 28, 2013 6:54 pm UTC

Not to mention that "reguard" would mean to guard something a second time, in contrast to "regard", which is the actual root under discussion. (They are, as it turns out, related words, though.)
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Eebster the Great » Mon Oct 28, 2013 7:23 pm UTC

Gardez la monnaie.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby sje46 » Wed Nov 13, 2013 12:42 am UTC

I tend to *really* dislike words that carry a heavy connotation of judgement or ad hominem behind them.

Haters/Hate on -- both of these are *said* to just refer to an unfair critic, but they're mostly used to imply that the other person is simply jealous. Anyone who thinks your crappy minecraft let's play is boring or needs the volume turned up or, you know, needs to not be filmed by a camcorder pointed at a screen isn't making valid points, they're just being a *hater*, who is *hating on* you.

Butthurt -- similar to above, except you are wrong because you are offended. Because being offended instantly means you lose the argument.

White knight -- is *supposed* to refer to a guy who *insincerely* comes to a girl's rescue in return for special female attention. is actually now just used to tell someone they are an asshole for being a decent human being.

Neckbeard -- "You are wrong because you are probably unattractive and socially awkward and/or are online too much".

troll -- In the internet sense. When used to refer to 1. someone who you disagree with (even though they're not trying to upset you) 2. public figures/countries/businesses/etc. It just annoys me to see internet terms overextended like that. "north korea" should never be referred to as a troll. It's a fucking country.

significant other -- I agree with the idea of a gender neutral version of boyfriend/girlfriend, but this term is just way too technical-sounding for my tastes. I love latin but latinate english has a feeling of cold and sterile non-offensibility. Generally these types of replacement terms (other example: "native american") tend to just be as boring as possible. It would be cool if we used another language instead, put a little more excitement into these words. Personally, I just prefer "partner".

"That offends me!". In quotes. It's actually rather rare that someone says "I'm offended" in that way. That's mostly the intentionally "politically incorrect" people who /claim/ others say that.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Eebster the Great » Wed Nov 13, 2013 1:31 am UTC

sje46 wrote:White knight -- is *supposed* to refer to a guy who *insincerely* comes to a girl's rescue in return for special female attention. is actually now just used to tell someone they are an asshole for being a decent human being.

I think it's more about ruining fun. It's the same reason bullies get upset if you tell them to stop picking on kids. But "white knight" clearly isn't the right term.

significant other -- I agree with the idea of a gender neutral version of boyfriend/girlfriend, but this term is just way too technical-sounding for my tastes.

Its singular use also has the semantic implication that everyone else to them is an "insignificant other."

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:04 pm UTC

sje46 wrote:significant other -- I agree with the idea of a gender neutral version of boyfriend/girlfriend, but this term is just way too technical-sounding for my tastes. I love latin but latinate english has a feeling of cold and sterile non-offensibility. Generally these types of replacement terms (other example: "native american") tend to just be as boring as possible. It would be cool if we used another language instead, put a little more excitement into these words. Personally, I just prefer "partner".
Yeah, but "partner" runs the risk of sounding super gay. And I don't mean risk in the sense that there's anything wrong with being super gay, but rather in the sense that there's potential miscommunication when I hear anyone talk about their "partner", since I immediately think same-sex relationship.

I don't know that I've actually heard people talking about their own significant others in a personal sense. It's more commonly abbreviated "SO" or used to refer to romantic partners in general.
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Re: Words and phrases you hate for no particular reason

Postby seventytwo » Thu Nov 14, 2013 1:52 am UTC

microwaved wrote:Sheeple

Whenever used, it just permeates a certain smugness, and 9 times out of ten can be replaced with the words, "people who don't think, walk, talk, and act just like me"


I feel the same way about this one...

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Eebster the Great » Thu Nov 14, 2013 3:30 am UTC

I have been told people who go to school are sheeple, people who vaccinate their children are sheeple, people who vote are sheeple, people who take medicine are sheeple, religious people are sheeple, atheists are sheeple, and so on. It's just a way of labeling people who fall into some category you have conceived of that you dislike. It has effectively become a genericized insult.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Lazar » Thu Nov 14, 2013 3:54 am UTC

Within recent memory, I don't think I've seen anyone use "sheeple" in a way that wasn't ironic or trolling.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Eebster the Great » Thu Nov 14, 2013 7:45 am UTC

Lazar wrote:Within recent memory, I don't think I've seen anyone use "sheeple" in a way that wasn't ironic or trolling.

That's because you haven't been to the right parts of the internet.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Envelope Generator » Thu Dec 19, 2013 3:50 pm UTC

Anything with a redundant prefix. It makes me cringe to see someone talk of an upsurge in popularity, or of a work entitled Electric Boogaloo. They're just gratuitously frilly ways of saying surge and titled. This music history book I'm reading right now is riddled with entitled pieces of music.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby jaap » Thu Dec 19, 2013 3:55 pm UTC

Envelope Generator wrote:Anything with a redundant prefix. It makes me cringe to see someone talk of an upsurge in popularity, or of a work entitled Electric Boogaloo. They're just gratuitously frilly ways of saying surge and titled. This music history book I'm reading right now is riddled with entitled pieces of music.

You're quite entitled to be annoyed about that.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby mathmannix » Thu Dec 19, 2013 4:05 pm UTC

Yes, hopefully there will be a downsurge of words like that on this forum.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Copper Bezel » Thu Dec 19, 2013 7:49 pm UTC

God, yes, misuse of entitled fills me with endless rage.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby [ˈɖ͡ʐæk.sɪ̈n] » Wed Mar 05, 2014 1:54 am UTC

The fact that "important" and "portant" are not in fact antonyms, with the latter meaning "the way one carries oneself." Because of course they come from entirely different roots, despite forming a pair nigh-identical to "possible" and "impossible," "personal" and "impersonal," et cetera. English sandhi (in this case of the "in-" prefix) is a terrible thing.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Wed Mar 05, 2014 2:36 am UTC

Wouldn't they both ultimately be from "port" = "carry"?

Also, considering that in- changes to im-, ir-, and il- based on the following sound regardless of whether it means "into" or "not", I'm not sure what you're saying about sandhis?

(inefficient/inflamed, impossible/impress, irresponsible/irradiate, and illogical/illuminate)
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby [ˈɖ͡ʐæk.sɪ̈n] » Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:04 pm UTC

Sorry, Wikipedia gives in -> im/ir/il/et cetera as an example of English sandhi :P.
As for the roots, you appear to be right (again sorry!): Latin importare "bring in" -> Medieval Latin importare "be significant in" -> Medieval French important. Lesson learned: never trust Google's built-in dictionary.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby goofy » Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:18 pm UTC

[ˈɖ͡ʐæk.sɪ̈n] wrote:Sorry, Wikipedia gives in -> im/ir/il/et cetera as an example of English sandhi :P.


Really? I'd disagree, I'd say it's Latin sandhi.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:20 pm UTC

[ˈɖ͡ʐæk.sɪ̈n] wrote:Sorry, Wikipedia gives in -> im/ir/il/et cetera as an example of English sandhi.
Yes, that is a sandhi (though goofy's correct that it's more properly a Latin sandhi than an English one).

But you seemed to indicate that this particular sandhi is what causes the confusion between the two meanings of "im-", which confused me because the sandhi applies equally to both meanings of the base prefix "in-".

Surely the problem comes from "in-" having two meanings in the first place, rather than from the sandhi changing how that prefix is realized.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby [ˈɖ͡ʐæk.sɪ̈n] » Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:38 pm UTC

I'll just see myself out then (not in a bitter way, obviously, but I didn't want to use the :P emoticon again).

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Derek » Thu Mar 06, 2014 11:42 pm UTC

[ˈɖ͡ʐæk.sɪ̈n] wrote:I'll just see myself out then (not in a bitter way, obviously, but I didn't want to use the :P emoticon again).

And yet, to avoid using :P again, you had to use :P. Consider that.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby [ˈɖ͡ʐæk.sɪ̈n] » Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:34 pm UTC

Derek wrote:
[ˈɖ͡ʐæk.sɪ̈n] wrote:I'll just see myself out then (not in a bitter way, obviously, but I didn't want to use the :P emoticon again).

And yet, to avoid using :P again, you had to use :P. Consider that.

Goddammit.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Klear » Fri Mar 07, 2014 11:23 pm UTC

Today the word "snarkasm" came into my mind, followed by utter disgust for it and the need to brush my teeth, even though I didn't say it aloud. Sure enough, searching for it gives "about 25,500" hits on google, and I already hate it. At least it's not me who originally created that abomination.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Copper Bezel » Sat Mar 08, 2014 8:49 am UTC

Did you mean it as a redundant portmanteau (chillax) or the state of rapture brought about by a climactic moment of snark? Because if it's the latter, it's kinda awesome. I might be having one right now.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Klear » Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:18 am UTC

Copper Bezel wrote:Did you mean it as a redundant portmanteau (chillax) or the state of rapture brought about by a climactic moment of snark? Because if it's the latter, it's kinda awesome. I might be having one right now.


Hmm.. yeah, the second option is way better, but unfortunately not the way it's used. Also, snarkgasm doesn't really work. Nor does snargasm... =(

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Sat Mar 08, 2014 1:56 pm UTC

Why does "snarkgasm" not work? Surely appending -gasm to a word is the conventional way to make that word into a kind of orgasm.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Derek » Sat Mar 08, 2014 7:34 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:Why does "snarkgasm" not work? Surely appending -gasm to a word is the conventional way to make that word into a kind of orgasm.

/kg/ is not a valid sequence in English, as far as I know. They have to merge into either /k/ or /g/, so "snarkasm" or "snargasm". Of course, it's fine for spelling, but you can't get the desired pun in speech.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Sat Mar 08, 2014 7:49 pm UTC

Yeah, because "background" isn't a word or anything. Pretty much any sequence is fine across morpheme boundaries, and I think any worthwhile pun should be robust enough to handle a slightly longer holding of a consonant in the middle.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Klear » Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:40 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:Why does "snarkgasm" not work?


It's fugly.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Rhombic » Sun Mar 09, 2014 11:47 am UTC

Why's rhythm dryly wry? (no vowels)

I absolutely loathe the word "embouchure". It's so cheesy.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Sun Mar 09, 2014 3:35 pm UTC

Did your mother never teach you "sometimes Y"?
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