Need more books similar to my favorites

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Pobega
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Need more books similar to my favorites

Postby Pobega » Tue Aug 07, 2007 2:46 pm UTC

I've read a fair amount of books in my life, but I'm always bored with them. The only books I've actually enjoyed were Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and Prey by Michael Crichton.

I'm looking for books that have a similar Sci-Fi/Futuristic theme to it, without being cliched like the million and one Sci-Fi books that are just another Star Trek ripoff (At least that's how it feels to me).

I've tried reading other books by Crichton, and none of them have really interested me (Except Timeline, which I'll read when I get unlazy). Bradbury is alright, but nothing matches Farenheit 451.

Any ideas?

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Postby SecondTalon » Tue Aug 07, 2007 2:52 pm UTC

1984? Brave New World?
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Postby Pobega » Tue Aug 07, 2007 3:03 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:1984? Brave New World?


1984 looks fantastic, and I like George Orwell as a writer (Who hasn't read Animal Farm?). I'll definitely be picking that one up when I have some spare cash.

After looking both books up on Wikipedia, I discovered that my taste in novels is Dystopian Fiction.

What about Prey though; Are there any other books like that? I liked the way they combined programming ideas with what is going on in the story. It kept me interested even through the boring explanations.

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Postby Cuton » Tue Aug 07, 2007 3:22 pm UTC

Childhood's End. It will rock your world.

Cuton

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Postby SecondTalon » Tue Aug 07, 2007 3:24 pm UTC

Beats me. Only thing I've really read that involves programming was Wiz Biz and the other novels in the series. Given that it's fantasy and not sci-fi, dunno if you'd care.

Might want to try Cat's Cradle. Not exactly Vonnegut's best work, but it does deal with the end of the world.

I don't know of any other grey goo novels, though... there's probably dozens, I just don't know of any off hand.
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Postby clockworkmonk » Tue Aug 07, 2007 3:45 pm UTC

Well, I suggest Phillip K. Dick. Specifically, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and A Scanner Darkly.

They both feature heroes questioning their role in society and reality, and are not at all like Star Trek.
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Postby Pobega » Tue Aug 07, 2007 3:48 pm UTC

Thanks for all the suggestions, most of these books I'll definitely be reading sometime soon. I've been looking for the motivation to read and I just haven't had it, until now.

Thanks again everyone.

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Postby TLP » Tue Aug 07, 2007 6:33 pm UTC

To fit in with with all those Dystopian books, have you read A Clockwork Orange? That's one of my favorites after Brave New World.

Oh, and whatever you do, don't read Crichton's newest one Next -- it was awful.

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Postby Pobega » Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:25 pm UTC

TLP wrote:To fit in with with all those Dystopian books, have you read A Clockwork Orange? That's one of my favorites after Brave New World.


That was actually the last book I read, I loved it. I saw the movie directly after reading the book, and it really made me appreciate how well written the book was.

Oh, and whatever you do, don't read Crichton's newest one Next -- it was awful.


I wasn't planning on it; I've noticed that most of Crichton's work isn't up to par with his good stuff. It's either awesome or horrible with him.

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Postby Pebbles » Wed Aug 08, 2007 12:51 am UTC

I have tried about four times to read a Clockwork Orange... I just cant get past this new language he's using.. I can read it, sure.. but Ive got no idea whats happening. One day Ill have to try when Ive got a full day to spare just to think through every sentence and figure out what these bloody kids are doing. Clearly, Ive only read the first few chapters and Im not really sure what happened in them anyway.

Of course I could just skip the book and try the movie, Ive heard its good.
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Postby Koeppi » Wed Aug 08, 2007 1:05 am UTC

It doesn't fit your description exaclty, but I have a similar taste and I enjoyed 'I have no mouth and I must scream'.
It's a short novel, you can find it online for free.

edit: the free online version seems to have vanished
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Postby digitalc » Wed Aug 08, 2007 2:28 am UTC

Crichton's The Terminal Man is really good. Have you tried any William Gibson? Neuromancer is my favorite.

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Postby Malice » Wed Aug 08, 2007 3:07 am UTC

Very Good Crichton:

Sphere
Airframe
State of Fear
A Case of Need (medical thriller written back when he was still a student)
Rising Sun

(off the top of my head)

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Postby Darcey » Wed Aug 08, 2007 5:55 am UTC

I am a huge fan of dystopian fiction. Lemme take a look at my shelves and list all the good stuff I've got there.

In the order in which I found them on my shelves:
- /The Stand/ by Stephen King (post-apocalyptic)
- /House of the Scorpion/ by Nancy Farmer (I think it was dystopian; read it ages ago)
- /The Giver/ by Lois Lowry (a softer dystopia and written for children but very, very good)
- /1984/ by Orwell (already mentioned but I remention it and note that it is my favourite book ever)
- /Anthem/ by Ayn Rand (lots of people seem to hate her; I've never read anything else by her but I really liked this)
- /This Perfect Day/ by Ira Levin (out of print and hard to find but absolutely worth the twenty dollars I spent on this crumbling paperback, and possibly the second-best book I have ever read)
- /Brave New World/ by Aldous Huxley (one of those awesome dystopias disguised as utopias)
- /Feed/ by M.T. Anderson (about the future where everyone has the internet implanted directly in their heads)

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Postby Pobega » Wed Aug 08, 2007 6:24 am UTC

Pebbles wrote:I have tried about four times to read a Clockwork Orange... I just cant get past this new language he's using.. I can read it, sure.. but Ive got no idea whats happening. One day Ill have to try when Ive got a full day to spare just to think through every sentence and figure out what these bloody kids are doing. Clearly, Ive only read the first few chapters and Im not really sure what happened in them anyway.

Of course I could just skip the book and try the movie, Ive heard its good.


You have to wade your way through the sentences slowly to really understand what is going on. I consider myself a fairly good reader, and even I find myself going back and re-reading sentences because I didn't think I fully understood what was going on. By the time you hit chapter 6 you'll be able to interperet what they're saying enough to comprehend what is going on.

And if you can't, there's always Wikipedia!

I am a huge fan of dystopian fiction. Lemme take a look at my shelves and list all the good stuff I've got there.

Thanks for the list, I think I'll be buying 1984 first after seeing how many times it wass mentioned and how much it is esteemed as a dystopian novel.

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Postby bookishbunny » Thu Aug 09, 2007 6:56 pm UTC

I loved The Talisman by Stephen King. Also, China Mieville's stuff.
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Postby Jesse » Thu Aug 09, 2007 8:21 pm UTC

Malice wrote:Very Good Crichton:

Sphere
Airframe
State of Fear
A Case of Need (medical thriller written back when he was still a student)
Rising Sun

(off the top of my head)


Agreed. Also 'Disclosure' and 'Jurassic Park'

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Postby Malice » Thu Aug 09, 2007 10:41 pm UTC

bookishbunny wrote:I loved The Talisman by Stephen King.


And Peter Straub. If you liked the Talisman, you might like his stuff. Try:

-Julia
-Ghost Story
-Houses Without Doors (short stories)
-Mystery

Those are all pretty darn good.

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Postby bookishbunny » Fri Aug 10, 2007 12:45 pm UTC

Malice wrote:
bookishbunny wrote:I loved The Talisman by Stephen King.


And Peter Straub. If you liked the Talisman, you might like his stuff. Try:

-Julia
-Ghost Story
-Houses Without Doors (short stories)
-Mystery

Those are all pretty darn good.


I don't know why I didn't mention Straub there. The Talisman made me pick up a few of his books to see how his solo voice varies from King. They worked very well together on The Talisman, and I can't wait to read Black House.
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Re: Need more books similar to my favorites

Postby sunkistbabe1 » Sat Aug 11, 2007 4:10 am UTC

Pobega wrote:I've read a fair amount of books in my life, but I'm always bored with them. The only books I've actually enjoyed were Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and Prey by Michael Crichton.

I'm looking for books that have a similar Sci-Fi/Futuristic theme to it, without being cliched like the million and one Sci-Fi books that are just another Star Trek ripoff (At least that's how it feels to me).

I've tried reading other books by Crichton, and none of them have really interested me (Except Timeline, which I'll read when I get unlazy). Bradbury is alright, but nothing matches Farenheit 451.

Any ideas?


I've read a lot of Dean Koontz over the years, some of his stuff was pretty good. There are a few books with the same main character who has that rare disease where he can't go out in the sun. "Fear Nothing" is one of them. The creatures in it are more supernatural than futuristic, but I really enjoyed it. "Seize the Night" was the other novel with him in it.

Other than that, before the past 3 years when I started having kids and didn't get enough time to read, I read a lot of Mystery Novels (Mary Higgens Clark - Lisa Gardiner)

I haven't read any new stephen king in like 10 years! LOL

Hopefully one day soon I will have more time to catch up on my reading. There are tons of books on our shelves I have yet to read. Like the last 4 books in the WOT... and the entire Dune series including the ones Herbert's son wrote. And several other mysteries my mother sent me.
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Re: Need more books similar to my favorites

Postby Malice » Sat Aug 11, 2007 4:29 am UTC

sunkistbabe1 wrote:I haven't read any new stephen king in like 10 years! LOL


Here's what you've missed between 2007 and 1997:

1997: Hearts in Atlantis. An absolutely beautiful book featuring interwined narratives about the sixties.
1998: Bag of Bones. Hands down, one of the best books he's ever written.
1999: The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon. (A very, very excellent "little girl lost" story, with some nifty supernatural overtones.
2000: On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. One of the best and smartest books on writing I've ever read.
2001: Dreamcatcher. (An incredibly well-written plot-mashup... a little bit like War of the Worlds meets The Big Chill.)
2001: Black House (with Peter Straub), the sequel to The Talisman; a very different but still very, very good book.
2002: From a Buick 8 (one of King's most lyrical and original stories in years. Doesn't even take place in Maine. :p)
2002: Everything's Eventual, a fantastic book of short stories. I don't think there's a dud in the bunch (14 of them all told); proof that in this form, at least, King only gets better with age.
2004 (give or take 30 years): The end of the Dark Tower series, which, warts and all, is probably the best fantasy (/horror/science-fiction/western/whatever) novel-in-parts since The Lord of the Rings.

I'm a huge King fan, but these are the 9 best things he did in the past 10 years (which, King being as prolific as he is, means I am leaving some stuff behind--most notably his most recent three, unfortunately).

But, seriously. Get reading, man.

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Re: Need more books similar to my favorites

Postby sunkistbabe1 » Sat Aug 11, 2007 4:33 am UTC

Malice wrote:
sunkistbabe1 wrote:I haven't read any new stephen king in like 10 years! LOL


Here's what you've missed between 2007 and 1997:

1997: Hearts in Atlantis. An absolutely beautiful book featuring interwined narratives about the sixties.
1998: Bag of Bones. Hands down, one of the best books he's ever written.
1999: The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon. (A very, very excellent "little girl lost" story, with some nifty supernatural overtones.
2000: On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. One of the best and smartest books on writing I've ever read.
2001: Dreamcatcher. (An incredibly well-written plot-mashup... a little bit like War of the Worlds meets The Big Chill.)
2001: Black House (with Peter Straub), the sequel to The Talisman; a very different but still very, very good book.
2002: From a Buick 8 (one of King's most lyrical and original stories in years. Doesn't even take place in Maine. :p)
2002: Everything's Eventual, a fantastic book of short stories. I don't think there's a dud in the bunch (14 of them all told); proof that in this form, at least, King only gets better with age.
2004 (give or take 30 years): The end of the Dark Tower series, which, warts and all, is probably the best fantasy (/horror/science-fiction/western/whatever) novel-in-parts since The Lord of the Rings.

I'm a huge King fan, but these are the 9 best things he did in the past 10 years (which, King being as prolific as he is, means I am leaving some stuff behind--most notably his most recent three, unfortunately).

But, seriously. Get reading, man.


I think I own bag of bones and dreamcatcher (saw the movie - wanted to read the book first tho - oh well)

Haven't read the Dark Tower series yet, we did buy them a while back from a used book store, but didn't get around to them.

Unfortunately, the first year after the girls were born I didn't do much besides try to squeeze in sleep because I was getting up a couple times a night ... and trying to work part time from home at the same time. But now they sleep much better so I'm getting in as much as I can...
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Postby UmbrageOfSnow » Sat Aug 11, 2007 7:14 am UTC

digitalc wrote:Crichton's The Terminal Man is really good. Have you tried any William Gibson? Neuromancer is my favorite.


Yeah, I was going to suggest that in addition to all the traditional dystopian stuff, he might try some cyberpunk. Maybe Snow Crash, by Neal Stephenson, but then again, I don't know how much a non-reader would enjoy that.
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Postby Narsil » Sat Aug 11, 2007 1:34 pm UTC

malice wrote:2001: Dreamcatcher. (An incredibly well-written plot-mashup... a little bit like War of the Worlds meets The Big Chill.)

No. Bad. Stop talking, you just lost all credibility.
I worked my ass off to read this book and it was easily the worst thing I've ever read. Just completely mundane and nonsensical.
Spoiler:
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Postby SecondTalon » Sat Aug 11, 2007 2:22 pm UTC

Bag of Bones the best thing he's written?

The hell? It read like he just wrote a general overview and handed it to some college students to flesh out. It was the book that made me completely give up on him.
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Re: Need more books similar to my favorites

Postby Mighty Jalapeno » Sat Aug 11, 2007 2:37 pm UTC

sunkistbabe1 wrote:I've read a lot of Dean Koontz over the years, some of his stuff was pretty good.

CLEARLY someone hasn't been paying attention....
Narsil wrote:
malice wrote:2001: Dreamcatcher. (An incredibly well-written plot-mashup... a little bit like War of the Worlds meets The Big Chill.)

No. Bad. Stop talking, you just lost all credibility.
I worked my ass off to read this book and it was easily the worst thing I've ever read. Just completely mundane and nonsensical.

Heheheh, attack of the ass-weasels!

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Postby Narsil » Sat Aug 11, 2007 2:49 pm UTC

There was something about bacon in there too, if I'm not mistaken.
Spoiler:
EsotericWombat wrote:MORE JUNK THAN YOUR BODY HAS ROOM FOR

Mother Superior wrote:What's he got that I dont?
*sees Narsil's sig*
Oh... that.

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Re: Need more books similar to my favorites

Postby sunkistbabe1 » Sat Aug 11, 2007 4:28 pm UTC

Mighty Jalapeno wrote:
sunkistbabe1 wrote:I've read a lot of Dean Koontz over the years, some of his stuff was pretty good.

CLEARLY someone hasn't been paying attention....


Didn't see that thread yet. :)

I did say some of his stuff was pretty good. I remember the odd book that after several chapters I was soooooo bored I just gave up. But I did read a lot of his books, this is also back in High School when I had more time to read. Now I pick and choose my books carefully because I dont have time to read a crappy one.

lol
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