Geeky/Nerdy Kids Books

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GMontag
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Postby GMontag » Sun Jun 24, 2007 1:29 am UTC

niko7865 wrote:
GMontag wrote:...
Redwall series
....


Redwall was amazing. I read every one of those damn books and cooked a bunch of the food described therein.


The food in Redwall is one of the major reasons I got into home brewing as an adult.

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liza
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Postby liza » Sun Jun 24, 2007 2:46 am UTC

Anyone read Tamora Pierce books? I loved those. Sort of geeky, as they're fantasy and remarkably historically accurate.

I loved the Alanna books and the Trickster duad. Kel less so, and I barely finished the first book of the Immortals. Hated that series.

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Postby Jacque » Sun Jun 24, 2007 3:21 am UTC

Anything by Oliver Sacks.
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Postby TheStranger » Sun Jun 24, 2007 4:16 am UTC

"The Dark is Rising" sequence, by Susan Cooper
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blind visionary
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Postby blind visionary » Sun Jun 24, 2007 4:27 am UTC

GMontag wrote:
niko7865 wrote:
GMontag wrote:...
Redwall series
....


Redwall was amazing. I read every one of those damn books and cooked a bunch of the food described therein.


The food in Redwall is one of the major reasons I got into home brewing as an adult.
Oh man. The food in Redwall was amazing. I didn't knwo what most of it was, but it sounded so god damn delicious! Awesome books too.

I read Ender's Game in 4th grade and still love it to this day.


And on the topic of Harry Potter, has anybody seen the documentary Jesus Camp? We watched it in my World Religions class, and there's this one scene where the woman is preaching to a bunch of kids at the camp and said, "And while I'm on the subject, let me say something about Harry Potter. Warlocks are the enemies of God! And I don't care what kind of hero they are, they're an enemy of God and had it been in the old testament Harry Potter would have been put to death!" The entire class broke out in near hysterical laughter.

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__Kit
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Postby __Kit » Sun Jun 24, 2007 7:03 am UTC

I'm amazed how you guys can remember the books you read, I have a lot of trouble memorizing what I've read
=]

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Marbas
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Postby Marbas » Sun Jun 24, 2007 7:08 am UTC

__Kit wrote:I'm amazed how you guys can remember the books you read, I have a lot of trouble memorizing what I've read


I don't, and now to prove my point, a list of all the YA fantasy/sci-fi that I can name off the top of my head.

Trickster's Choice
Trickster's Queen
Keys to the Kingdom series
Violet Tower series
Young Wizards series
Shade's Children
Growing Wings
The Bartimaeus Trilogy
Sabriel, Lirael, and Abhorsen
His Dark Materials
The Xenocide Mission
Bordertown series
The Chrestomanci Chronicles
Warriors of Alvana

Okay...screw it...I'm bored of this.
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liza
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Postby liza » Sun Jun 24, 2007 7:17 am UTC

So someone else did read Tamora Pierce. :D I loved Tricker's.

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Marbas
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Postby Marbas » Sun Jun 24, 2007 7:29 am UTC

Somnia wrote:So someone else did read Tamora Pierce. :D I loved Tricker's.


I thought they were pretty good as well. Although I can't remember much about the story because I read them shortly after the second book came out.
Jahoclave wrote:Do you have any idea how much more fun the holocaust is with "Git er Done" as the catch phrase?

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Postby cephalopod9 » Sun Jun 24, 2007 10:10 am UTC

I'm sorry, but Goosebumps books are not geeky. I'm sure you could get geeky about them, but in and of themselves, I just don't see it.

I loved Redwall books too. Did anyone catch the animated series PBS had a while back? I just remembered I wanted to see them and didn't.

Oh oh OH,
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Dynotopia.

Also, saying H2G2 isn't geeky is like saying Star Trek isn't geeky.
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Postby Hawknc » Sun Jun 24, 2007 10:20 am UTC

Pretty much any book I read as a kid/teenager would probably be considered geeky; before Harry Potter, nobody between the ages of about 7 and 17 read books, or at least would admit to reading. It simply wasn't done in social circles. That said, what I remember liking...the Obernewtyn series, Space Demons trilogy by Gillian Rubenstein (I wish I could find those again), anything by David Eddings or Sara Douglass, and of course Redwall.

Edit: also lots of Animorphs (thanks to whoever posted in the "brag about your books" thread), because my mum used to work for Scholastic so I was never short on books to read.
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FiercestCalm
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Postby FiercestCalm » Sun Jun 24, 2007 11:11 am UTC

You know, I kept skipping over this thread because I couldn't think of any books I'd read that were all that geeky... and then I came to see it and realized they were.
A Wrinkle in Time is still one of my all-time favorite books, I have a beat up paperback that gets read every now and then when I'm bored before bed.
I also loved Tamora Pierce, but had forgotten about her until now.

I read so, so much as a kid, but sadly not so much anymore. All the required university reading gets in the way of the good stuff.
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Postby Zyhlaari » Sun Jun 24, 2007 2:41 pm UTC

This thread has reminded me of all those books I read as I grew up. This calls for a trip to the library and some serious re borrowing. Its reassuring to know the books I loved are considered geeky.

I really have to agree with the Redwall stories though. I was given one as a gift and I admit I thought it looked kinda...boring. Then I read it. And every single other one in existence at the time.

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kcr
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Postby kcr » Sun Jun 24, 2007 3:16 pm UTC

wing wrote:
kcr wrote:That whole mindset of "there are no books for my children to read except Harry Potter!! oh noes!" really pisses me off. Harry Potter is a great series and it's enjoyable and all, but there are so many other amazing children's books out there (some "geeky" and some not) that are better than HP. Just go to the damn library! Browse! There will be something in there that you'll like.

/rant
Harry Potter is actually very interesting even without the story itself. It gets kids acclimated to reading BIG FAT BOOKS without looking at it as a chore. Being able to knock out a big, fat textbook in one night is an important undergraduate skill.

Length issues aside (though I'm probably not one to talk; I never had problems reading long books), these are people who are saying there aren't books with content they'll be interested in.

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Postby luminosity » Sun Jun 24, 2007 11:51 pm UTC

Ren wrote: the "Dark is Rising" books by Susan Cooper?


I'd completely forgotten about the dark is rising. I loved that series at the time.

The Gathering by Isobelle Carmody (well, technically YA, but I read it as a kid) is still one of my favourite books.

I loved a whole ton of Victor Kelleher's books too, Hunting of Shadroth, Green Piper, Red King.. and a whole bunch more.

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liza
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Postby liza » Mon Jun 25, 2007 12:42 am UTC

Marbas wrote:
Somnia wrote:So someone else did read Tamora Pierce. :D I loved Tricker's.


I thought they were pretty good as well. Although I can't remember much about the story because I read them shortly after the second book came out.


Same here. I couldn't tell you much about the story except that I enjoyed it thoroughly. I went to a book signing about a week after the first one was released; she talked about the story and what it entailed - I was so psyched! Geesh, that was what, four years ago? How time flies.

Hawknc wrote:Pretty much any book I read as a kid/teenager would probably be considered geeky; before Harry Potter, nobody between the ages of about 7 and 17 read books, or at least would admit to reading.


So true - for most circles. My friends and I were not unlikely to read in the library through lunch. We often would make an unofficial pact saying that no one would mention reading in lieu of lunch to those outside the circle. Now, it's finally become acceptable-er. It might warrant a little teasing, but not much. And I'll be a senior in high school come September.

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Taejo
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Postby Taejo » Mon Jun 25, 2007 12:53 am UTC

chrispy1 wrote:
GMontag wrote:Encylcopedia Brown
The Phantom Tollbooth


My God, I forgot about these two!! Oh the happy memories....


Oh, the pain of a deeper comprehension, of a world discovered and snatched away: did you not cry for innocence lost?

Sorry about that. But for some reason the end of The Phantom Tollbooth really upset me. Great book, nevertheless.
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nightofshiningdeath
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Postby nightofshiningdeath » Fri Jun 29, 2007 8:28 pm UTC

SpitValve wrote:
Jesster wrote:As for Animorphs, I have numbers 1 - 41 on the shelf behind me along with two of the Megamorph books.


Forty-one!? Crikey, no wonder I didn't make it all the way through...

I think I have number 3 and Megamorphs 1, where I think they go back in time?


There's actually 54, plus all the random extra books that are kind of like spin-offs but not. I know this because I owned all of them at one point in time. :D
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Postby Nuclear Spoon » Fri Jun 29, 2007 8:38 pm UTC

blind visionary wrote:
And on the topic of Harry Potter, has anybody seen the documentary Jesus Camp? We watched it in my World Religions class, and there's this one scene where the woman is preaching to a bunch of kids at the camp and said, "And while I'm on the subject, let me say something about Harry Potter. Warlocks are the enemies of God! And I don't care what kind of hero they are, they're an enemy of God and had it been in the old testament Harry Potter would have been put to death!" The entire class broke out in near hysterical laughter.


I saw that a while back, it was diaphragm-achingly hilarious, yet pant-wettingly scary at times. It's frightening to think that people like them might actually exist.
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Postby PatrickRsGhost » Fri Jun 29, 2007 8:39 pm UTC

I had a small collection of "Calvin and Hobbes". Still do. But it's bigger now.

I had a few of the "Goosebumps" books. A friend of mine introduced me to them. They were okay at first, but then I got bored with them real quick. It took me almost an hour or two to read through one.

I had "My Teacher is an Alien". The first one only.

I also had "Not Quite Human."

I didn't have it, but I remember my 6th grade teacher reading to us "The Silver Crown." That book was very good.
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Postby bigglesworth » Fri Jun 29, 2007 9:24 pm UTC

I remember watching the BBC version of that at school. Hooray for BBC special effects! (A la Doctor Who)
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Postby ArchangelShrike » Fri Jun 29, 2007 10:09 pm UTC

I had a uncle that liked me, and had a huge collection of science fiction and some sci-fi books from the 60s-70s, and earlier. Needless to say, I read those. I wish I could remember the names...

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Postby une see » Fri Jun 29, 2007 10:27 pm UTC

Nuclear Spoon wrote:
blind visionary wrote:
And on the topic of Harry Potter, has anybody seen the documentary Jesus Camp? We watched it in my World Religions class, and there's this one scene where the woman is preaching to a bunch of kids at the camp and said, "And while I'm on the subject, let me say something about Harry Potter. Warlocks are the enemies of God! And I don't care what kind of hero they are, they're an enemy of God and had it been in the old testament Harry Potter would have been put to death!" The entire class broke out in near hysterical laughter.


I saw that a while back, it was diaphragm-achingly hilarious, yet pant-wettingly scary at times. It's frightening to think that people like them might actually exist.


The sad part is that I immediately thought upon hearing the warlocks line, "Haha. WoW."

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Postby SecondTalon » Fri Jun 29, 2007 10:37 pm UTC

Hm.. I guess I was the only one who read The Circle of Magic series.

Of course, given how hard they were to find again, even with Google's help.. I'm probably right.
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Postby Sandry » Sat Jun 30, 2007 2:36 pm UTC

Tamora Pierce's and Susan Cooper's books were some of the first I read that I really enjoyed. Mixed up in that was about five years worth of full on Arthurian legend obsession, as well. I'm not sure what I read (other than T. H. White), but there sure does seem to be a lot of it. (I think, on the whole, mythology is pretty good reading for kids. They don't tend to go overboard on subtle, it's frequently pretty damned exciting, and it's an awesome grounding for catching references and whatnot later on.)

Very slightly later was Robin McKinley stuff... Douglas Adams' stuff - got through pretty much all of that before I hit teen years.

Not quite as young, but still relatively young I read through pretty much every Anne McCaffrey, Mercedes Lackey and David Eddings book in existence. I thnk that was mostly all in one summer. It was entertaining at the time, anyhow.

Oh, and an author no one seems to find much of - Joel Rosenberg. Loved his D'shai stuff, and the Fire Duke and whatever the couple after that were. The ones that there were so many of, something to do with a group of college students becoming their D&D characters and getting stuck in a different world was not as good, but sadly much easier to find.

I'm not sure I was all that good at distinguishing good literature at that age anyhow. I read through maybe a quarter of our library's scifi/fantasy section using the dubious qualification of "this spine and/or cover looks interesting."

Thing is, I think people are incredibly enthused by JKR because her books are appealing to some kids who otherwise wouldn't be reading. I daresay pretty much all of us would have been reading unless we had almost no options. I doubt if it really works this way, but if Harry Potter is analagous to a gateway drug for reading, then flipping excellent. But honestly, even though I think His Dark Materials and other stuff people advertise as "this is what you can read when done with Harry Potter!" is great, I'm not sure it has the same appeal. And when it comes down to it, how much of this stuff is peer pressure and marketing, etc? Harry Potter, if not now, at least a few years back, was blatantly cool. What other series qualifies? It's never been cool to read before.
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