Good Omens

A slow, analog alternative to the internet

Moderators: SecondTalon, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
Jesse
Vocal Terrorist
Posts: 8635
Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2006 6:33 pm UTC
Location: Basingstoke, England.
Contact:

Re: Good Omens

Postby Jesse » Sat Nov 22, 2008 12:28 am UTC

bigglesworth wrote:I disliked Anansi Boys but liked American Gods. So there you go.


This, but more extreme. I hate Anansi Boys and I love American Gods.

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 25766
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Good Omens

Postby SecondTalon » Mon Nov 24, 2008 3:45 pm UTC

Man, what's wrong with you people? Anansi's Boys was wonderful.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6139
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: Good Omens

Postby Jorpho » Mon Nov 24, 2008 5:24 pm UTC

Well... I can see how some people might not like it much. Thoroughly charming as its descriptions are (my favorite is the tale of the elevator), they do tend to ramble on while not contributing much.

However, I'm afraid that I cannot see why people go gaga for American Gods. Ugh.

User avatar
Jesse
Vocal Terrorist
Posts: 8635
Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2006 6:33 pm UTC
Location: Basingstoke, England.
Contact:

Re: Good Omens

Postby Jesse » Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:55 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:Man, what's wrong with you people? Anansi's Boys was wonderful.


Honeslty, I couldn't deal with the subject matter. Fairly certain you're aware of my own identity issues, and having the idea of someone who looks like you but is more liked and happier and I am in a cold sweat now. I cannot actually finish reading the book.

darktan
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 2:41 pm UTC

Re: Good Omens

Postby darktan » Wed Nov 26, 2008 12:27 am UTC

I borrowed it from a friend and read it in more or less one sitting over the summer. Excellent book, but it didnt really feel like Gaiman had put much into it. If they didnt put his name on the cover, I would never have guessed he had a hand in it.


as an aside,
Hyena wrote:Awesome book. I actually have it overdue (3 months) from the school library, just sitting in my locker. they don't charge you the fees if you return the book, so i'm lucky like that.


I have to wait ages and ages (longest was over 7 months for Diamond Age) for any book thats checked out out of my school library because of people who 'forget' to return the book, and because my school also doesnt penalize for late returns, this happens a lot. :(

If you've finished reading it, please return it so someone else can borrow it.

...jerkface.

User avatar
JayDee
Posts: 3620
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 3:13 am UTC
Location: Most livable city in the world.
Contact:

Re: Good Omens

Postby JayDee » Wed Nov 26, 2008 12:59 am UTC

darktan wrote:Excellent book, but it didnt really feel like Gaiman had put much into it. If they didnt put his name on the cover, I would never have guessed he had a hand in it.
We mentioned this over in the Neil Gaiman thread, too:

I remember both of them as having described it as a fairly equal collaboration. I hadn't read any Gaiman when I read Good Omens, personally, so I can't give my impression.
In answer to a question regarding the Good Omens Wikipedia page:
Neil Gaiman wrote:We were both living in England when we wrote it. At an educated guess, although neither of us ever counted, Terry probably wrote around 60,000 "raw" and I wrote 45,000 "raw" words of Good Omens, with, on the whole, Terry taking more of the plot with Adam and the Them in, and me doing more of the stuff that was slightly more tangential to the story, except that broke down pretty quickly and when we got towards the end we swapped characters so that we'd both written everyone by the time it was done, but then we also rewrote and footnoted each others bits as we went along, and rolled up our sleeves to take the first draft to the second (quite a lot of words), and by the end of it, neither of us was entirely certain who had written what. It was indeed plotted in long phone daily calls, and we would post floppy disks (and this was back in 1988 when floppy disks really were pretty darn floppy) back and forth. I don't know where whoever wrote that Wikipedia entry got it from, but then, it's Wikipedia, which means it's only as good and as bad as the Wikipedia hive mind that created it.

I think Anansi Boys is a good book to recommend based on enjoying Good Omens, if only because it's also a comedy. I highly recommend the audiobook version, read by Lenny Henry.
The Mighty Thesaurus wrote:I believe that everything can and must be joked about.
Hawknc wrote:I like to think that he hasn't left, he's just finally completed his foe list.

AntonGarou
Posts: 121
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 11:17 am UTC

Re: Good Omens

Postby AntonGarou » Wed Nov 26, 2008 8:21 am UTC

Gaiman described the process in a Q&A I attended as both of them "trying to get to the next good bit before the other guy"- he described how, since their schedules were such he would sleep when Terry was awake and vise versa, before going to sleep each would leave on the other's electronic secretary a "This is a good bit, you're gonna love it" message, which would then spur the listener to get to "the next good bit" ASAP so he could try and win that friendly competition.
I'm not nitpicking, I'm quarkpicking!

rustedneurons
Posts: 47
Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2008 8:14 am UTC

Re: Good Omens

Postby rustedneurons » Thu Nov 27, 2008 11:21 pm UTC

I'm reading it now and 100 pages in I can tell it will be a favourite.

Also,
JayDee wrote:
Neil Gaiman wrote:I don't know where whoever wrote that Wikipedia entry got it from, but then, it's Wikipedia, which means it's only as good and as bad as the Wikipedia hive mind that created it.

That made me imagine Jimmy Wales shouting 'spawn more overlords'.

User avatar
Various Varieties
Posts: 505
Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 7:24 pm UTC

Re: Good Omens

Postby Various Varieties » Fri Nov 28, 2008 1:56 am UTC

Here are Pterry's comments on the Good Omens writing process:
Terry Pratchett wrote: "Neil and I had known each other since early 1985. Doing it was our idea, not a publisher's deal."

"I think this is an honest account of the process of writing Good Omens. It was fairly easy to keep track of because of the way we sent discs to one another, and because I was Keeper of the Official Master Copy I can say that I wrote a bit over two thirds of Good Omens. However, we were on the phone to each other every day, at least once. If you have an idea during a brainstorming session with another guy, whose idea is it? One guy goes and writes 2,000 words after thirty minutes on the phone, what exactly is the process that's happening?

I did most of the physical writing because:

1) I had to. Neil had to keep Sandman going -- I could take time off from the DW;

2) One person has to be overall editor, and do all the stitching and filling and slicing and, as I've said before, it was me by agreement -- if it had been a graphic novel, it would have been Neil taking the chair for exactly the same reasons it was me for a novel;

3) I'm a selfish bastard and tried to write ahead to get to the good bits before Neil.

Initially, I did most of Adam and the Them and Neil did most of the Four Horsemen, and everything else kind of got done by whoever -- by the end, large sections were being done by a composite creature called Terryandneil, whoever was actually hitting the keys. By agreement, I am allowed to say that Agnes Nutter, her life and death, was completely and utterly mine. And Neil proudly claims responsibility for the maggots. Neil's had a major influence on the opening scenes, me on the ending. In the end, it was this book done by two guys, who shared the money equally and did it for fun and wouldn't do it again for a big clock."

Spoiler:
"Yes, the maggot reversal was by me, with a gun to Neil's head (although he understood the reasons, it's just that he likes maggots). There couldn't be blood on Adam's hands, even blood spilled by third parties. No-one should die because he was alive."




mikhail wrote:I've picked up various Sandmen off shelves in bookstores, but they always seem to be no earlier than part 5 of a series, so I put them back.

Most libraries I've visited have that problem with books in a series (novels as well as comics): surely libraries should stock more copies of the run's initial entry, in order make it as easy as possible for people to get into the series? The most extremely unbalanced example I've seen is Birmingham (UK, I mean!) central library, which has about four or five copies of "Dream Country", but none of "The Kindly Ones" (which is the one I'm up to). Still, at least it has Sandman comics at all... and there's always inter-library loans...

That library's comic section is particularly weird, because even though its comics section is fairly big, "costumed heroes" make up only a tiny proportion of it. It's mostly of obscure, arty, or out of print stuff. (Not necessarily hidden gems, though.) What little Alan Moore they have is mostly of the Swamp Thing and Halo Jones variety, rather than Watchmen and America's Best Comics. Even their Los Bros Hernandez comics aren't Love and Rockets! Now, this sort of balance isn't a bad thing: such a mishmash makes a change from other library comics sections; thanks to it, I've finally been able to read a few volumes of Krazy Kat and Pogo! But it's definitely jarring to me, because the implication is that at some point they've had someone on their staff who's made a point of purchasing less obvious comics to stock... and yet that's let down by the complete and utter disorganisation of certain aspects of the shelves. I mean, they seem to have a near-full Cerebus collection - but the library's own intrusive "GRAPHIC NOVEL!!!" stickers cover up the numbers on the spines saying what order they're in! Little things like that make me wonder how such an eclectic collection came about.

Sorry, Good Omens. One of my favourite books. Carry on.

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6139
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: Good Omens

Postby Jorpho » Fri Nov 28, 2008 5:05 am UTC

Maggots? I don't remember those.

User avatar
Amarantha
Posts: 1638
Joined: Tue Nov 27, 2007 4:56 am UTC
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Good Omens

Postby Amarantha » Fri Nov 28, 2008 9:26 am UTC

^Think telemarketers and angry demons trapped in phones...
omgryebread wrote:...if I'm watching a fantasy, I want my princess to stab some motherfuckers, claim the crown herself, then invade the prince's kingdom and sleep with his sister.

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6139
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: Good Omens

Postby Jorpho » Fri Nov 28, 2008 3:48 pm UTC

Ah, yes, that quietly rings a bell.

Maybe it's time I read that book again. (But there's so much else to read!)

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6139
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: Good Omens

Postby Jorpho » Tue Sep 09, 2014 6:00 am UTC

I was idly contemplating the movie version (in anticipation of going to see The Zero Theorem) and lo, there is news of sorts:
Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman's Good Omens set to air on BBC Radio 4 at Christmas

User avatar
freezeblade
Posts: 1117
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 5:11 pm UTC
Location: Oakland

Re: Good Omens

Postby freezeblade » Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:01 pm UTC

Jorpho wrote:I was idly contemplating the movie version (in anticipation of going to see The Zero Theorem) and lo, there is news of sorts:
Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman's Good Omens set to air on BBC Radio 4 at Christmas


I'm quite stoked about this, especally after a similar treatment done to Neverwhere
Belial wrote:I am not even in the same country code as "the mood for this shit."

Muz
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Nov 05, 2009 9:38 pm UTC

Re: Good Omens

Postby Muz » Sat Sep 27, 2014 9:40 pm UTC

I read Good Omens a few years ago after everyone I met kept getting shocked (SHOCKED, I say!) that I hadn't read it yet, given my tastes and some of what I write myself. Fantastic book. (Plus I'm a sucker for fun takes on the Four Horsemen.)

I expect the creators of Supernatural are fans as well, unless their Crowley is a complete and total coincidence.. :wink:
Author of the Zeus Is Dead: A Monstrously Inconvenient Adventure, the epic comedic fantasy where reality TV heroes slay actual monsters and the Greek gods have their own Twitter feeds!

Website: Michaelgmunz.com Twitter: @TheWriteMunz Facebook: MichaelGMunz

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6139
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: Good Omens

Postby Jorpho » Sat Sep 27, 2014 11:39 pm UTC

In other news, it so happens that there's a new book of Pratchett's non-fiction essays out, prompting Gaiman to write an introduction that talks about some of their time together:
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/s ... eil-gaiman

via BoingBoing

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6139
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: Good Omens

Postby Jorpho » Tue Dec 30, 2014 6:03 am UTC

Did anyone tune in?

More stuffs here:
"Time is running out": Neil Gaiman on why Radio 4's Good Omens is really for Terry Pratchett

I had no idea that Good Omens came so early in Pratchett's career. I thought Discworld was running full-steam by then.


Return to “Books”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Feedfetcher and 1 guest