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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:55 am UTC
by Awia
The 13 and a 1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear, one of my favourite books when I was younger, I can't really explain the content as it's rather strange...
I've not read it in a while though, so it might have not aged so well.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sun Sep 21, 2008 7:38 pm UTC
by Nyarlathotep
Exotria wrote:Myst: The Book of Atrus by Rand and Robyn Miller with David Wingrove

Agreed, very much!

The Book of Ti'ana, which is in itself a prequel to the Book of Atrus, is also decent. It's not nearly as well written, sadly, and elements of the plot still irritate me, but the world it presents is a fascinating one.

The Book of D'ni is... boring. XD

Now...

The Neverending Story by Michael Ende. It's one of those unfortunate cases where there was a book, but the movie-version is so much more well-known that nobody realizes the book exists. Or that the book is much, much, much better than the movie. Or that the movie missed the point in a lot of respects.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:50 pm UTC
by Klapaucius
A number of these books (Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell and Killing Yourself To Live are actually pretty popular, judging by the fact that they hold perennial positions at my local Barnes and Noble's "Popular Books" table (which is roughly five feet away from the entrance.) So they're doing well.

I would have to say Olaf Stepledon and Alfred Bester. The first is hard to describe in his stoic awesomeness, being from the halcyon days of SF right between H.G. Wells and Frank Herbert, and the second is a visionary from a little later, and the only proof I have that I didn't imagine him is an article on his most famous novel in a book about unfilmable books (and those who try to film them.)

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 12:39 am UTC
by Sandry
Definitely Matt Ruff - Set This House in Order. His other stuff is good as well, and I loved Fool on the Hill to bits as well, but STHiO is one of my favourite books ever, and seems like few people have heard of the author.

I'm somewhat less invested in, but still enjoy and see little of Joel Rosenberg's D'shai and the second in that world, Hour of the Octopus. They're funny, light and engaging books.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 5:46 pm UTC
by Wildcard
The Bomber's Story.

And NO ONE has heard of it. I think publishers were too squeamish or something, particularly about the prequel, Monkeyland. (Monkeyland is subheaded "A Savage Indictment of Racism" and it is brutally vivid. The Bomber's Story is less brutal, but...well, you have to read it to know what I'm babbling about.)

http://bloodwrite.com/BombersStory.html

It's published by the author. Someone gave it to me as a gift, and it sat around for about a year before I had time and inclination and said, "Well, let's see, what's this book about?" I finished the whole thing in one night--staying up until about 5:30 in the morning.

One of the best damn books I've ever read.

Edit: Just looking through my old posts and noticed the link above is broken. But hey, what do you know, it's available for Kindle now! http://www.amazon.com/The-Bombers-Story ... B00C317EF8

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 8:37 pm UTC
by Ciega
Speaking of books that publishers felt squeamish about, there's A Bomb Built In Hell by Andrew Vachss. It can be read online here http://www.vachss.com/av_novels/bomb.html
All his books, really, although I've met one person who had heard of him. I only discovered them because the title and font of Sacrifice caught my eye in the library one day. Letters that look like they're written in blood suggested H. P. Lovecraft- type horror to me, but it turned out to be about fake Satanism as a cover for child pornography. Starting from the point of view of the social workers trying to deal with the kid they used, who thought the Satanism part was real... yeah, it's still scary.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sat Oct 11, 2008 11:19 am UTC
by TodayIsTomorrow
Books noone has heard of that I like.

Anything by Tom Robbins, especially "Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates", "Villa Incognito" and "Jitterbug Perfume." "Fierce Invalids" is the story of a CIA agent who gets cursed by a shaman in the Amazon, his grandmother, and his journey to get the curse lifted. It is highly humorous and quite insane. "Villa Incognito" is the story of three men who survived the crash of a B-52 in vietnam, and decided to stay disappeared. If you've ever been to Thailand, it'll feel just like home. "Jitterbug Perfume" is the quest of a couple to survive through time, a perfume company headed by two of the most insane people I've ever read about, and a host of other characters, all tied together by the perfect perfume. Oh, and one woman is searching for the perfect Taco. She makes perfume too.

"Earth Abides", I can't for the life of me remember who wrote it, but its the best appocalypse book I've ever read. Its slow, but an absolute must-read.

That's about all I can think about right now, but I'm sure I'll come up for more.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sun Oct 19, 2008 4:19 am UTC
by apricity
Kendo_Bunny wrote:Betsy~Tacy by Maud Hart Lovelace. I consider this series to be perfect for little girls, but they're really not well known. The series is basically a creative autobiography of the author, telling about her life growing up at the turn of the century. Some of the details are changed around, but it's like Laura Ingalls Wilder if she had been born 20 years later.

I LOVE those books!! I never actually got to the marriage part... I think I made it to Betsy going to high school. They really are so perfect for kids. I love the imaginativeness and that time period. I think they're actually better than the Little House books, because they don't have all that added description of what a latch-key is (I still don't get it), just stories.

My recommendations might have been heard of, I think they're starting to gain in popularity now, but if not they're ridiculously perfect for any outsider teenager. They also might be way underrepresented here because they're always in that "Teen series" section in bookstores where some of the dumbest books (Gossip Girl anyone?) reside. Megan McCafferty's series about Jessica Darling, starting with Sloppy Firsts. It's written as the diary of this girl Jessica, who is really smart but still makes some dumb teenager mistakes. It has one of the best-written relationships I've ever read, contradictions and dynamic personalities among all the characters, unpredictability, hilarity, and general awesomeness. It's very very real, so not for the fantasy lovers among us, but if you want to find out that people out there really do understand what it's like to be an outside observer (or if you boys want to understand us crazy geeky girls!), it is so realistic. Things don't necessarily happen like you want them to. Some things suck. Some things are forgotten. It is always funny and intelligent but still real and believable. Read it.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sun Oct 19, 2008 8:25 pm UTC
by radguy58
One book that I read in 6th(ish?) grade that has always stuck with me, but no one seems to remember is "Invitation to the Game" by Monica Hughes. It featured a group of students dumped into a city full of unemployed undesirables after graduation (because they were too dumb to qualify for jobs). The group of students learns how to live in their slightly orwellian society and find hope in a secretive competition known as 'The Game'. It was interesting because it mixed survivalism , sci-fi technology, and distopian ideas all in one package.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sun Oct 19, 2008 8:46 pm UTC
by Mother Superior
Harry Stephen Keeler- The riddle of the travelling skull
An unbelievably complex detective story in which the final fantastically impossible-to-figure out plot takes upwards of forty pages to fully explain. Still not sold? One of the supporting characters is named Sophie Kratzenschneiderwumpel, or "Suing Sophie" and some other of the author's titles are:
The Case of the Transposed Legs
The Skull of the waltzing Clown
The Case of the Crazy Corpse
The Case of the 16 Beans
The Case of the Two-headed Idiot
I killed Lincoln at 10:13!

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Oct 22, 2008 9:41 pm UTC
by blue31560
Wasp by Erik Frank Russell.
World without Stars by Poul Anderson.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Fri Oct 24, 2008 6:28 pm UTC
by kvaks
I'm not sure if these are obscure enough, but here goes:

Tom Sharpe: The Throwback. The funniest book I've ever read. At one point it threw me into a laughing fit that lasted for hours. I had to leave the house in fear of waking up my room mate.
Geoff Ryman: 253. As one reviewer wrote: More life wisdom in 253 words than most authors have in all of their bibliography.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 9:16 pm UTC
by diotimajsh
psyck0 wrote:Really? REALLY? I was FORCED to read that book [Sophie's World] for a class and didn't get more than 80 pages in. I thought it was nothing more than a textbook that attempted to disguise itself as a novel by tacking on a plot. The plot itself made no sense to me and the musings of the girl were moronic. I DO have a strong bias against philosophy, but no one else in the class got more than 150 pages in, either. I do know ONE other person who likes it, though.

I liked Sophie's World myself, although at first I was a little weirded out by the whole "mysterious older man interacting with teenage girl in secret, while he seems to know creepily many details about her life." The plot does seem kind of ridiculous and childish at first, but I thought it improved noticeably as you get later into the book, since then things start to retrospectively make sense. I didn't really like the ending, but eh. It really is as much a novel as it is a textbook, in my opinion, and it incorporates some clever ideas.

On the other hand, I like philosophy, so I may be biased in favor of it. I had a few misgivings about how some of the philosophical concepts were explained or presented (and sometimes with how Sophie reacted to them), but overall I'd still recommend it.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 11:14 am UTC
by kinigget
Aequitas wrote:A book series that doesn't seem to get much love outside of wotmania.com is the Malazan Book of the Fallen (it's the name of a series). Malazan is a grittier fantasy series that doesn't have a lot of pure good or pure evil characters, from what I've read of it. It Chronicles a chaotic era of the Malazan Empire. The author doesn't ever tell you anything, electing to constantly show, making it a harder read. But, I love it.

I would like to second this, not only are the books very well written, its a fantasy series that doesn't borrow anything from tolkein. the characters are all very deep without too much effort wasted on backstory, in fact, there is almost no backstory whatsoever. You just get thrown into this amazing world and are told "you're on you're own". truly great writing.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 8:18 pm UTC
by userxp
Awia wrote:The 13 and a 1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear, one of my favourite books when I was younger, I can't really explain the content as it's rather strange...
I've not read it in a while though, so it might have not aged so well.

That book was awesome! :D

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sun Sep 13, 2009 8:29 pm UTC
by PAstrychef
Andrew Vachss is good, if his stories get grimly repetitive after a while.
Robert Olmstead's A Trail of Heart's Blood Wherever I Go as well as his Coal Black Horse are some of the finest writing that's ever crossed my path. Jim Dodge's Not Fade Way is a great mix of road tale, ghost story and homage to the great music of the late 50s. Paula Gosling wrote some great mysteries, including Solo Blues, Fair Game and The Zero Trap. Most of her stuff is now out of print, alas.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Mon Sep 14, 2009 4:28 am UTC
by eekmeep
TodayIsTomorrow wrote:Books noone has heard of that I like.

Anything by Tom Robbins, especially "Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates", "Villa Incognito" and "Jitterbug Perfume." "Fierce Invalids" is the story of a CIA agent who gets cursed by a shaman in the Amazon, his grandmother, and his journey to get the curse lifted. It is highly humorous and quite insane. "Villa Incognito" is the story of three men who survived the crash of a B-52 in vietnam, and decided to stay disappeared. If you've ever been to Thailand, it'll feel just like home. "Jitterbug Perfume" is the quest of a couple to survive through time, a perfume company headed by two of the most insane people I've ever read about, and a host of other characters, all tied together by the perfect perfume. Oh, and one woman is searching for the perfect Taco. She makes perfume too.


Love Tom Robbins, especially "Jitterbug Perfume" and "Another Roadside Attraction."

The "Hawkline Monster" by Richard Brautigan, too.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Mon Sep 14, 2009 10:27 am UTC
by el_loco_avs
I don't think Sophie's World belongs in this thread. I know at whole lot of people that have read it and there was a movie based on the book. (wiki shows there was a board game, cdrom game and a MUSICAL(??) based on it as well).

Awesome book though, need to reread it.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Tue Sep 15, 2009 11:50 am UTC
by shainer
"Mortal engines" by Philip Reeve and the "Snow Queen" by Joan D. Vinge.
Especially the second, it's rather old and I never found it in a bookshop.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Fri Sep 18, 2009 5:10 am UTC
by ponzerelli
Nyarlathotep wrote:The Neverending Story by Michael Ende. It's one of those unfortunate cases where there was a book, but the movie-version is so much more well-known that nobody realizes the book exists. Or that the book is much, much, much better than the movie. Or that the movie missed the point in a lot of respects.


I loved that book so much. I read it when I was on vacation a couple years ago and was blown away by it. Sitting in a hammock and reading that book with a nice ocean breeze blowing is one of the happiest and most peaceful memories I have.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 3:44 pm UTC
by Klapaucius
An Arsonist's Guide To Writer's Homes in New England by Brock Clarke. I read it four years ago and, apart from finding in fantastic, completely forgot about it until this week, when a friend I haven't talked to since then found a copy, was reminded of me, and got back in touch with me to talk about it.

So it's an excellent book, and it brings people together.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sat Feb 06, 2010 5:10 pm UTC
by Elvish Pillager
I've never met anyone else who's heard of the Dragon of the Lost Sea series. (Wikipedia tells me that only the first book is called that, and that the series is actually called the Dragon series, but that name is too generic to use, and Dragon of the Lost Sea is the first book and the only one with a particularly unique name.)

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sun Feb 07, 2010 1:17 am UTC
by dg61
bennyprofane wrote:Just about everything by Kobo Abe, Kenzaburo Oe, and Ryunosuke Akutagawa is ignored in the west, it seems, which is quite unfortunate.

Abe is sort of like Kafka, Chandler, Beckett, and Dick having an Asian love-child and setting him lose upon the world. Woman in the Dunes is the easiest book by him to find, but what's really worth reading are his plays and three of his novels: The Kangaroo Notebooks, Secret Rendezvous, and The Box Man. Seriously good writer, probably one of the most under-rated and talented from the west.

Kenzaburo Oe was a Nobel prize winner, and his work shows it--his later novels can get kind of stuffy and slow, but his earlier work, especially Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids and Teach Us To Outgrow Our Madness, reflect a serious genius in his craft.

Ryunosuke Akutagawa is to Japanese short stories as Balzac is to them in the West. He innovated the form, and was very masterful and craftslike in his approach to writing. I like to think of him as Natsume Soseki meets H. P. Lovecraft.

Japanese literature is generally ignored by westerners, with the possibility exception of the peculiar but excellent Haruki Murakami(read Kafka on the Shore, like, now). I'll join the Akutagawa love and name-drop Hell Screen, Yam Gruel, Rashomon, and In a Grove. Oddly enough, Japanese literature is in fact hilariously overrepresented to the point of it being an in-joke.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Feb 17, 2010 4:00 pm UTC
by doglive
Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow - Jerome K. Jerome

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Feb 17, 2010 10:21 pm UTC
by TheAmazingRando
For me, it would be V. by Thomas Pynchon. I'm sure plenty of people have heard of it, but I've never met another person who's read it. Most people I've met who've read Thomas Pynchon started and ended with (and, mostly, never finished) Gravity's Rainbow, since it has a reputation as a long, difficult book. V. is a much easier read, I think, has a much more coherent story, and is still full of wit and genius. It's the only book I own that I'll pick up occasionally and just read random sections of, to admire the language or find something meaningful hidden within. I really can't praise it highly enough.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sun Feb 21, 2010 9:19 pm UTC
by feedme
There's a trilogy I read called the Night Angel Trilogy, which is about an assasin with a little bit of magic. My friend hated it because he wanted the guy to be a cold blooded killer, and he wasn't, but I really enjoyed the plot and just the writing in general.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:16 am UTC
by Shark89
I forget who wrote it, but in 11th grade, we were given a selection of books to read for a book report, which included all the classics (The Catcher in the Rye, The Great Gatsby, etc.), a few popular newer books (Speak is one I remember), and then I saw a book I had never heard of.

A Canticle for Leibowitz

That book was absolutely amazing, but whenever I've brought it up, no one responds. So I guess it's either not well known, or something.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:42 am UTC
by dg61
Shark89 wrote:I forget who wrote it, but in 11th grade, we were given a selection of books to read for a book report, which included all the classics (The Catcher in the Rye, The Great Gatsby, etc.), a few popular newer books (Speak is one I remember), and then I saw a book I had never heard of.

A Canticle for Leibowitz

That book was absolutely amazing, but whenever I've brought it up, no one responds. So I guess it's either not well known, or something.

I just looked it up and it seems pretty cool. It make sense that monks/nuns(of divers faiths) would be the rebuilders of civilization after a catastrophe.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:03 am UTC
by Marbas
The Orphans of Chaos trilogy. Good worldbuilding and fun character interaction.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:30 am UTC
by psychosomaticism
TodayIsTomorrow wrote:Books noone has heard of that I like.

Anything by Tom Robbins, especially "Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates", "Villa Incognito" and "Jitterbug Perfume." "Fierce Invalids" is the story of a CIA agent who gets cursed by a shaman in the Amazon, his grandmother, and his journey to get the curse lifted. It is highly humorous and quite insane. "Villa Incognito" is the story of three men who survived the crash of a B-52 in vietnam, and decided to stay disappeared. If you've ever been to Thailand, it'll feel just like home. "Jitterbug Perfume" is the quest of a couple to survive through time, a perfume company headed by two of the most insane people I've ever read about, and a host of other characters, all tied together by the perfect perfume. Oh, and one woman is searching for the perfect Taco. She makes perfume too.


Loved Villa Incognito. The characters all fit together in the end, and they were all so quirky.
Didn't care for his Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas, found it preachy and new-agey. Willing to give him another try, but surrealism needs to keep away from giving advice about life.

I don't want to recommend him to this thread because he's actually won a nobel prize for literature, but I've also heard he isn't much known outside his native language; Gabriel Garcia Marquez. One Hundred Years of Solitude was such an odd read, but really good. Just a hundred years of history of a fictional town through this one family, but that doesn't do it justice.

I think the title of the thread it kind of poorly conceived, as much as I like to talk and get recommendations about new books. There will always be people who haven't heard of such and such a book, regardless of popularity; I interpret it as "Books you like but ones people you associate with don't much know.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Sun Apr 04, 2010 10:10 pm UTC
by tavore
definitely second the malazan book of the fallen. erikson takes robert jordan's worldbuilding, george r.r. martin's politics, and greek mythology's scope on the gods and turns into a bigger and better series than anything i have ever read.

the series isn't for everyone. these are thick, difficult books. one of the biggest complaints i have heard about them is that erikson flat out refuses to explain anything, rather letting the reader figure everything out for themselves. and these books are fucking bleak. like...the road bleak. he mercilessly murders characters you care about, horrible things happen to good people. cities, civilizations, and entire races are trampled underfoot. the gods use mortals as easily discardable pawns, ascendants do what they want and take what they want. this is a world ravaged by war, greed, and abuse of power. epic in scope (it takes five books just to set up the three main storylines) and almost finished (the last book doesn't have a release date set yet as far as i know), these books take epic fantasy to a whole new level. there are no static characters, and his system of magic is completely unlike anything i have read before. the cultures and people groups he builds are the most believable i have ever read, and i cannot recommend these highly enough. i have read most of the highly regarded epic fantasies out there and this is my absolute favorite. high re-readability is a huge bonus too, and ian c. esselmont, a colleague who helped erikson develop the malazan world, has been writing prequel novellas to fill in the gaps.

/end rabid fangirlism here.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 1:20 am UTC
by Mew151
A book I read about 5 years ago was Unexpected.
It was an anthology of 11 (I think) mysterious stories, and I loved it.

Some stories that I remember are,

Loser, a story about a seventh grader who starts losing things. It's actually quite creepy.
Little Time, about a girl, who, on a walk discovers a miniature village in an old barn. At first, she thinks they are dolls, but she finds out they are actual living people.
Infinity Jinx, a 5-year-old boy, living in the future with robot nannies, meets a 9-year-old boy named Jack at his apartment complex. He finds out that he was given a shot that prevents him from aging, so that he stays five forever.

I don't remember the titles of some stories, but I do remember the plot to them:

A story about a boy who shoots himself on his first hunting trip.

A story about a girl from the future visiting 2005 to solve a mystery that happened in 1985. It's a game from the future, and they visit 20 years after the incident because "it's more fun that way."

-----------
I also like Twilight. No, not that twilight.
It's Twilight by Elie Wiesel.

It's a story about a Holocaust survivor that has visited a clinic for people who have mental problems dealing with religion.
Parts of the story describe his actions in the clinic, while other parts are flashbacks to his past.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 4:44 am UTC
by lollypatrolly
yellie wrote:Anything written by Ian Irvine! Especially his Three Worlds Cycle series, which is made up of 11 books so far. I've been a diehard fan of his since 2001 and I firmly believe he is one of the most under-appreciated fantasy authors ever. :|

I'll have to agree with this. I read the 4 books in the Well Of Echoes segment of his universe, and they're amazing. The world and its inner workings are fascinating, the overall atmosphere is pleasantly dark and gruesome, and the characters are very lifelike and believable. I'll have to search for the rest of the books, I guess. Here's hoping they're not disappointing, which could well be the case seeing that my expectancies are sky high right now.
I do find it weird that he's rather unknown. I guess he may disappoint if you're just looking for epic fantasy, as the dark setting and the downer endings could easily be a bit gut wrenching if you're not in the mood for such.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 11:06 am UTC
by Buddha with a bra on
I think I read the 5th Malazan book years ago? Brys Beddict? That one? Man, that book was cool.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Mon Apr 19, 2010 4:10 am UTC
by lifayt
Awia wrote:The 13 and a 1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear, one of my favourite books when I was younger, I can't really explain the content as it's rather strange...
I've not read it in a while though, so it might have not aged so well.


Most Definitely. Almost all of Walter Moers books deserve mention here, he has a fantastic style that appeals to young and old (in two languages mind you). The original German only slightly beats out the fantastic translations. My personal favorite in the series is "Rumo and his miraculous adventures", but "The City of Dreaming Books" is fantastic as well. I cannot stress enough how much these books deserve to be looked into.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Mon Apr 19, 2010 5:27 pm UTC
by Scarborough
bennyprofane wrote:Just about everything by Kobo Abe, Kenzaburo Oe, and Ryunosuke Akutagawa is ignored in the west, it seems, which is quite unfortunate.

His collection of short stories Beyond the Curve is also pretty good.

Sandry wrote:Definitely Matt Ruff - Set This House in Order.

I have that one sitting on my desk right now. Bad Monkeys was published about a month after this post, and was amazing. I started with BM and moved onto STHiO and I think BM is better. Never ended up finishing STHiO yet, though.

TheAmazingRando wrote:For me, it would be V. by Thomas Pynchon.

The Crying of Lot 49 is also pretty good imo. And a lot more compact. And has secret underground organizations who may or may not desire to overthrow the U.S. postal service and government. I'm not sure what's not to like in that one.

I think anything by Donald Antrim should be read (and actually stocked in bookstores). The Verificationist is about this group of psychologists who go to a pancake house and accidentally overanalyze each other. And then one psychologist has an out-of-body experience for like a hundred pages.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Mon Apr 19, 2010 5:35 pm UTC
by thicknavyrain
lifayt wrote:
Awia wrote:The 13 and a 1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear, one of my favourite books when I was younger, I can't really explain the content as it's rather strange...
I've not read it in a while though, so it might have not aged so well.


Most Definitely. Almost all of Walter Moers books deserve mention here, he has a fantastic style that appeals to young and old (in two languages mind you). The original German only slightly beats out the fantastic translations. My personal favorite in the series is "Rumo and his miraculous adventures", but "The City of Dreaming Books" is fantastic as well. I cannot stress enough how much these books deserve to be looked into.


I wish I could FIND 13 and a 1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear, I read Rumo and it instantly became one of my favourite books but I can't find a copy of the former in any library...

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Tue May 04, 2010 2:18 am UTC
by zlreitz
psychosomaticism wrote:I don't want to recommend him to this thread because he's actually won a nobel prize for literature, but I've also heard he isn't much known outside his native language; Gabriel Garcia Marquez. One Hundred Years of Solitude was such an odd read, but really good. Just a hundred years of history of a fictional town through this one family, but that doesn't do it justice.

This is one of my favorites! I'll admit, it is very strange, but it seems to have a genre all it's own. It like a realistic fiction novel with a bit of crazy and magic thrown in. Actually, a whole lot of crazy. Hardly any of my friends have heard of it, and if they've read it, they hate it. I can't see why, but to each his own.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Tue May 04, 2010 2:49 pm UTC
by davidmarlee
I constantly urge people to read Hidden Cities and Cosmicomics, both written by Italian writer Italo Calvino. Both books are very epic and beautiful, almost magic realist at times but not completely so. I would suggest people read Cosmicomics first and see if they like it. It's a series of stories that tell about the evolution of the universe, including a family living in space as the universe turns from liquid to solid, and people harvesting milk from the moon when it used to dip into the earth's water.

Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Posted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 8:25 pm UTC
by melladh
Louise Epstein's book "En trollkarl vittnar inte" (a magician doesn't testify)
It's a strange little mystery involving an orangery, a woman who works there, the police, and magicians named after the three wise men. Balthazar knows what happened (if I remember this correctly), but a magician doesn't tell his secrets. It's written far before fantasy got mainstream acceptance, and it's not quite fantasy, it just happens to involve those elements. It's very strange, and beautiful, and I know of no one else who has read it. I used to read and reread it because of the tune of the language alone, even though the actual story was quite endearing to me. Sadly I've only gotten to read it twice, because it's hidden away far back in the library where my parents live, and I've never managed to get a hold of a copy of my own.