The Cuckoo’s Calling - By Robert Galbraith

A slow, analog alternative to the internet

Moderators: SecondTalon, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
Nylonathatep
NOT Nyarlathotep
Posts: 720
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2011 3:06 am UTC

The Cuckoo’s Calling - By Robert Galbraith

Postby Nylonathatep » Fri Jul 19, 2013 9:24 pm UTC

The Title lied. It's actually written by J. K. Rowling.


It is reported that Rowling sent the manuscript to the publishers anonymously and that it was declined by at least one publishing house, including Orion Books.[5] It was eventually accepted by Sphere Books, which is an imprint of Little, Brown & Company, with whom Rowling had collaborated on her previous novel, The Casual Vacancy.

Before Rowling's identity as the book's author was revealed, 1,500 copies of the book had been sold since its release in April 2013.[5] The book surged from 4,709th[7] to the 1st best-selling novel on Amazon after it was revealed on 14 July 2013 that the book was written by Rowling under the name "Robert Galbraith".[8]

.. However, it was later reported that Rowling's authorship was leaked to a Times reporter via Twitter by the friend of the wife of a lawyer at Russells Solicitors, who had worked for Rowling. The firm has since apologised.[14]

After being revealed as the author, Rowling said that she would have liked to remain anonymous for a while longer stating that, "Being Robert Galbraith has been such a liberating experience… It has been wonderful to publish without hype and expectation and pure pleasure to get feedback under a different name."[15]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cuckoo's_Calling


I sympathize with J.K. here as authors can become the victim of their own success. While I never believe that J.K.Rowling has any remarkable talent, I did applaude her from trying to start from scratch again instead of using her fame. However this exercise in futility only proves that, ultimately, it is the author's name that sells the book. The sale of her crime novel was medicore at best until her pseudonym was revealed and now the book is getting the attention that it most likely didn't deserve.

User avatar
charliepanayi
Posts: 1531
Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 7:26 pm UTC
Location: London, UK

Re: The Cuckoo’s Calling - By Robert Galbraith

Postby charliepanayi » Fri Jul 19, 2013 10:06 pm UTC

You seem to be ignoring the fact that the reviews (both critical and customer) were very good before it was revealed to be JK Rowling, so saying the book doesn't deserve attention is rather harsh. As for saying the author's name sells the book, well that's hardly a startling revelation. There's always going to be big name authors. And the book's sales weren't even that bad, only people with little experience of what the market is like seem to think this book was some sort of resounding flop when nobody knew who the real author was.

I think it's pretty impressive they managed to keep it quiet for a while anyway.
"Excuse me Miss, do you like pineapple?"

"I don't want to achieve immortality through my work, I want to achieve it through not dying"

User avatar
Djehutynakht
Posts: 1546
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 1:37 am UTC

Re: The Cuckoo’s Calling - By Robert Galbraith

Postby Djehutynakht » Sat Jul 20, 2013 5:45 am UTC

Yeah...

I mean, I did hear the reviews were pretty great.

There wasn't universal praise of course. Some publishers are now coming to terms with the fact that they turned down J.K. Rowling. No Regrets!

After "A Casual Vacancy" flopped, I do think she wanted a fresh start. And apparently she did really well on this book.

It wasn't getting spectacular reviews, but then again it was a debut novel from someone who had reportedly never had a previously published sentence in his life.

I'd be curious to read it, but I highly doubt I'd be able to get a copy for several weeks.

User avatar
charliepanayi
Posts: 1531
Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 7:26 pm UTC
Location: London, UK

Re: The Cuckoo’s Calling - By Robert Galbraith

Postby charliepanayi » Sat Jul 20, 2013 7:57 am UTC

The Casual Vacancy didn't flop either. It's only a flop if you expect Harry Potter-sized sales from it.
"Excuse me Miss, do you like pineapple?"

"I don't want to achieve immortality through my work, I want to achieve it through not dying"

User avatar
Djehutynakht
Posts: 1546
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 1:37 am UTC

Re: The Cuckoo’s Calling - By Robert Galbraith

Postby Djehutynakht » Wed Jul 24, 2013 6:13 am UTC

Ah. Maybe people found it boring? Either way, from what I hear this book is generally well received.

I feel like there should be snarky quotation marks around the authors name in the thread title.

User avatar
Felstaff
Occam's Taser
Posts: 5166
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2008 7:10 pm UTC
Location: ¢ ₪ ¿ ¶ § ∴ ® © ™ ؟ ¡ ‽ æ Þ ° ₰ ₤ ಡಢ

Re: The Cuckoo’s Calling - By Robert Galbraith

Postby Felstaff » Tue Dec 17, 2013 1:27 pm UTC

I read it a few months ago, having had to wait two weeks for a copy to come up in the library. I have forgotten most of it, but I definitely found the Cuckoo's Calling to be better than the Casual Vacancy, of which the ending ruined the preceding 400 pages. On the down-side, TCC is as slow-paced as TCV, it contains zero threat to the main characters (how can the detective not even be in any sort of peril until the very climax? What kind of detective story is this?), it plods from interview to interview, leaving you with a lot of time to think. The climax isn't draw-breath-in-a-rapturous-fashion as you'd expect from a Christie novel, or even an episode of Monk, but it's agreeable. It's like 20 pages of talking though. That could have been cut down to about three. One thing I thought was highly flawed, however, and I'll spoiler it (even though I can't remember if this is what actually happened) is...
Spoiler:
the water from the vase after the flowers were taken out. The security guy was supposed to have slipped on it, right? How much water can one bunch of flowers actually spill when being carried from one floor to another? It seems a great leap to create a skiddy pool of water from a bunch of flowers that have been removed from their vase
...but overall I thought it was a pleasant, readable affair, but the plot is forgettable whereas the characters aren't (apart from Alison. I can't even remember who she was in the book.) I liked its irreverent and satirical take on modern attitudes to celebrity, fame, race, and the media, but it is essentially just a long list of 'talky' interviews in varying locales.

I'll be reading the next one, to be sure, because Rowling is such a great conjurer of worlds.
Away, you scullion! you rampallion! You fustilarian! I'll tickle your catastrophe.

User avatar
Felstaff
Occam's Taser
Posts: 5166
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2008 7:10 pm UTC
Location: ¢ ₪ ¿ ¶ § ∴ ® © ™ ؟ ¡ ‽ æ Þ ° ₰ ₤ ಡಢ

Re: The Cuckoo’s Calling - By Robert Galbraith

Postby Felstaff » Wed Jul 02, 2014 11:15 pm UTC

I just read the Silkworm. Much better book, much more involving mystery, much deeper insight to the established characters, who I am all growing fond of.
Away, you scullion! you rampallion! You fustilarian! I'll tickle your catastrophe.

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2939
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: The Cuckoo’s Calling - By Robert Galbraith

Postby PAstrychef » Thu Jul 03, 2014 12:32 am UTC

To answer your previous question-it takes very little water on a slick floor to make someone easily slip and fall. People slip on single grapes. About two tablespoons is all you need if the floor is smooth and the shoes aren't non-skid, and sometimes even if they are. I've gone down in kitchens where I didn't even notice the water until my ass hit the floor.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.


Return to “Books”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 33 guests