The Romantic Period

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Fola
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The Romantic Period

Postby Fola » Wed Apr 14, 2010 5:03 pm UTC

Hello! I'm new around here and this will be my first thread huzzah!

I'm a classical violist, entering college next year to pursue a degree in Viola Performance at Boston University. I love classical music, with my favorite period being the Romantic period.

So I pose this question to all of you: What are your top three compositions from the Romantic period? Mine are

1. Mahler's 10th Symphony (Adagio) - While it was never finished, the first movement is the most beautiful piece of music I have ever heard. The build to the climax in the middle is so breathtaking that I have to stop every time I hear it. I would recommend this recording http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FuGNVkYiiok

2. Debussy's String Quartet in G minor, Op. 10 - This piece is fantastic. The four movements have such depth to them, that you can't help but listen to it over and over. I listen to it every time i drive to my girlfriend's house (it's only about two minutes short of getting me there). My favorite recording is by the Emerson String Quartet, but this recording on youtube is worth as well http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVLTQh0BAG4

3. Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet, Op. 64 - I have performed this piece twice and each time it astounds me how intense the music is. My favorite movements being the Death of Tybalt and Romeo and the Grave of Juliet, this music is so powerful and emotional that I feel like breaking down in tears every time I hear it.

Thanks for reading, let me know some good romantic era music to check out.

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Midnight
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby Midnight » Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:53 pm UTC

I'm a big rachmaninoff fan, but I don't know that much about classical music.
uhhhh fuck.

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ChocloManx
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby ChocloManx » Thu Apr 15, 2010 1:05 am UTC

top three... that's a tough one...

I'd say Brahms' German Requiem, Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde aaaaand Dvorák's Symphony nº9

Or something like that.
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achan1058
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby achan1058 » Thu Apr 15, 2010 2:08 am UTC

Seeing how I am a Mahler addict, I would go for Mahler's 6, 9, and 10. I personally liked the completion, in particular the final movement.

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modularblues
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby modularblues » Thu Apr 15, 2010 4:55 am UTC

Tough one for me too... I will list the three that affected me the most.

(1) Brahm's Piano Concerto #1 -- Listening to it (I was around 13) got me feeling passionate about music. In general. Before that, practice was a chore and I hated it.

(2) Tchaikovsky's Symphony #4 -- Played this piece in my youth orchestra and fell in love with orchestral music.

(3) Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring -- Played it with phenomenal high school musicians at a music festival (conference), and it blew my mind. It still does every time I listen to it.

achan1058
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby achan1058 » Thu Apr 15, 2010 3:32 pm UTC

modularblues wrote:(3) Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring -- Played it with phenomenal high school musicians at a music festival (conference), and it blew my mind. It still does every time I listen to it.
A high school band capable of playing the Rite? I want to see that.

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modularblues
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby modularblues » Thu Apr 15, 2010 3:46 pm UTC

achan1058 wrote:
modularblues wrote:(3) Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring -- Played it with phenomenal high school musicians at a music festival (conference), and it blew my mind. It still does every time I listen to it.
A high school band capable of playing the Rite? I want to see that.

It's the MENC Eastern Division Conference that takes place every two years at various locations in U.S. Mid-Atlantic or New England.

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ChocloManx
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby ChocloManx » Fri Apr 16, 2010 1:34 am UTC

The Rite of Spring isn't romantic, though.
Egotist, n. A person of low taste, more interested in himself than in me.
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modularblues
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby modularblues » Sat Apr 17, 2010 12:34 am UTC

ChocloManx wrote:The Rite of Spring isn't romantic, though.

Yeah I know, I am kinda stretching it :P

I'm also a big fan of Rachmaninoff and Chopin's pieces (the piano concertos/sonatas/waltzes/etudes/impromptus...) because of their texture. When I listen to their pieces, I can forget about everything else :P

JordanM
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby JordanM » Sat Apr 17, 2010 3:41 am UTC

This is pushing it, but I'm playing Sibelius Symphony Two next month, and it's so... powerful. Also, Schumann Symphony One (in particular the fourth movement) is excellent. As a pianist and bassist myself, I would suggest Chopin, but I'm not sure how relevant that is to violists. Finally, you can't go wrong with Berlioz Symphony Fantastique, fifth movement (Dream of a Witch's Sabbath).

However, this is all relative. I recently played Beethoven Symphony Four and Egmont Overture, and they have many "romantic" parts, as well as much more modern stuff.

Even though I have a thing against Tchaikowsky, something has to be said for playing Capriccio Italien in a solid, capable, massive group. I played it in a festival with 66 other musicians (we still only had a bass section of three... which disappointed me, because the TSO played the Sibelius above with a section of 7 and not even 67 musicians). Some parts are just stupid though- if I recall correctly, at around bar 350 (very rough estimate) there is a bassoon and oboe solo... if the bassoon is out of tune, it suddenly becomes Capriccio Scotland. As well as the 32nd note ascending scales at an allegro. Not too terrifying for violins, but for basses... it's a workout.

Also, I prefer Dvorak Eight over Dvorak Nine, especially the fourth movement.

I like Rimsky-Korsakow, but I find a lot of his stuff very repetititititititive.

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modularblues
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby modularblues » Sat Apr 17, 2010 6:05 am UTC

If specific for violas - see this yahoo thread.

I second the Bruch -- smooth and gorgeous piece.

Kind of post-Romanticism...

The Bartók viola concerto is somewhat dark but in a good way I think.

I like Martinů's Rapsodia too.

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Masily box
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby Masily box » Sat Apr 17, 2010 6:49 pm UTC

Not to put a damper on our fun--good music is good music, no matter what--but Debussy and Prokofiev are hardly what most people would consider Romantic composers. It would be about as accurate to call Mozart a Romantic.

Some of my favorite Romantic works:

1. Schubert's song cycle Winterreise (Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau being incontestably the work's best interpreter)
2. Tristan und Isolde
3. Brahms 2 (or 3 or 4... it's kind of hard to choose...)

Fola
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Re: The Romantic Period

Postby Fola » Mon Apr 19, 2010 4:07 pm UTC

Masily box wrote:Not to put a damper on our fun--good music is good music, no matter what--but Debussy and Prokofiev are hardly what most people would consider Romantic composers. It would be about as accurate to call Mozart a Romantic.



Really? I consider some of Debussy and Prokofiev's works very romantic. Maybe it would have been more accurate to call them very-late-romantic-verging-on-20th-century. Don't get me wrong, they also have 20th century aspects to them, but I don't consider them as drastic as Shostakovich or Prokofiev's later works.

I guess by romantic in this context I meant pieces that reflected romanticism in you. That would have been more accurate.


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