Concert (aka Classical) music

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etaoin
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Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby etaoin » Sat Feb 13, 2010 11:11 pm UTC

A great place to look sophisticated by dropping names!

In all seriousness though, I searched for "classical" in this forum, & while there are some posts, there is no one comprehensive thread for recommendations. I am always interested in what other people like in this genre. Not just composers, if possible, but performances as well! And if there is a link to a youtube video of it or something, so much the better.

(Note: actual knowledge about music not required.)

I'll start the ball rolling. One of my favourite works is the Adagio from Beethoven's fifth piano concerto. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSeg69d3CQ8

More obscure (obscure is good, right?) is Lully's Marche pour la cérémonie des Turcs. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6ggBiOyEUY Lully was the court composer and friend of Louis XIV (Le Roi Soleil).

Also, the 1st movement of Bach's 6th Brandenburg concerto is a favourite, though I can't find an online version I love. This one's not bad: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFrwDNzdTnE. I'm generally crazy for the Brandenburg concertos.

What about you folks?
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Smiling Hobo » Sun Feb 14, 2010 4:47 am UTC

Bela Bartok arranged his six "Romanian Dances" for an orchestra at some point, and it sounds really good! Check it out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A02X9_w3DWA

This performance of Isaac Albeniz's "Iberia" is great, too. It's such a difficult set of pieces, but when it's pulled off right, it sounds incredible: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_vzDXXhUKs

Oh, and here's a video of Emil Gilels kicking names and taking asses while playing Rachmaninoff's prelude in G minor: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9idfQVkqKyw

Is this the sort of thing this thread is for?
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby etaoin » Sun Feb 14, 2010 6:18 am UTC

Smiling Hobo wrote:Is this the sort of thing this thread is for?


Heck yeah! :)

The Bartok was awesome. The allegro movement at the end was great!
Albeniz... hadn't heard of his music. You were right, that was some virtuoso playing right there. It makes me feel inadequate. All I can do is whistle.

Smiling Hobo wrote:Oh, and here's a video of Emil Gilels kicking names and taking asses...


Crikey, you weren't joking, were you?

/all added to my library.

I think this thread's remit could extend beyond only recommendations, and include questions as well. FYI, if so, I will likely be one of those asking them, not answering them. :P

Another of my favourites is Ralph Vaughan Williams. Here is, e.g., his English Folk Song Suite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rw1j0NsIIeE.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Bassoon » Sun Feb 14, 2010 7:12 pm UTC

I'm too much of a lazy ass to find youtube links, but I do have lots of recommendations:
Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony
Dvorak's "Song to the Moon"
Dvorak's Slavonic Dances (all of them)
Dvorak's Ninth Symphony ("The New World" symphony)
Rimsky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade"
Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsodies
Liszt's Liebestraum
Liszt's Hungarian Fantasy
Anything by Percy A. Grainger. Yes, all of it.
Carter Pann's Slalom
John Mackey's "Kingfishers Catch Fire"
John Mackey's "Voices and Echoes"
John Mackey's "Strange Humors"
John Mackey's "Antiphonal Dances"
John Mackey's "Breakdown Tango"
John Mackey's "Redline Tango"
Ravel's "Bolero"
Ticheli's "Vesuvius"
Ticheli's "An American Elegy"
de Meij's "Lord of the Rings"
de Meij's "Aquarium"
Holst's "The Planets"
Holst's "First Suite in Eb"
Bernstein's "Candide"
Mahr's "Fantasia in G"
Arnold's "Scottish Dances"
Leemans' "Marche des Parachutistes Belges"
Schwantner's "In evening's stillness..."

At any rate, I'm pretty sure at least half of them don't even have youtube videos. But that's my listing, I guess.

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby achan1058 » Sun Feb 14, 2010 7:19 pm UTC

Here's a list of works that I like, in no particular order:

Mahler's Symphonies (all)
Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde
Mahler's Kindertotenlieder
Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto (all)
Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 1
Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2
Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini
Saint-Saen's Piano Concerto (all)
Shostakovich's Symphony No. 5
Shostakovich's Symphony No. 10
Shostakovich's Symphony No. 11
Shostakovich's Symphony No. 13
Shostakovich's String Quartet No. 8
Shostakovich's Violin Concerto No. 1
Shostakovich's Cello Concerto No. 1
Shostakovich's 24 Preludes and Fugues
Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 2
Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3
Mendelssohn's Symphony No. 3
Mendelssohn's Symphony No. 4
Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto
Nielson's Symphony No. 2
Bach's Goldberg Variations
Beethoven's Symphony No. 3
Beethoven's Symphony No. 5
Beethoven's Symphony No. 9
Mussorgsky's Picture at an Exhibitation
Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, complete with Nijinsky's choreography
Elgar's Cello Concerto
Holst's The Planets
Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1
Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 4
Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 5
Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby etaoin » Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:48 pm UTC

This is brilliant! I'll be at it for days with this many new leads. Thanks! :)

Yes, Dvorak's symphonies 5-8 are definitely on my list as well.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Phill » Mon Feb 15, 2010 10:04 am UTC

etaoin wrote:This is brilliant! I'll be at it for days with this many new leads. Thanks! :)


Me too!

One recommendation I have is Gorecki's 3rd Symphony (Symphony of Sorrowful Songs). If at all possible, hear it live. I heard it live at the Proms a few years back and it was, and still is, the most powerful piece of music I have ever heard live. It doesn't work so well on CD, still beautiful though.

Also, Grieg's Wedding Day at Troldhaugen is beautiful. If I'd known about it when I got married I would have liked to have it played. Really joyful, bouncy tune.

I'm a sucker for the piano so I love Chopin (probably my favourite), also Debussy, Liszt, Rachmaninov, all the usual suspects! Particular faves of mine are Shostakovich 1st and 2nd piano concertos, Grieg's piano concerto, Mozart's Sonata in C (K. 545 I think) .... too many to choose from!

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby grafpa » Mon Feb 15, 2010 7:20 pm UTC

Y'all should totally check out some John Adams stuff... imho, he's one of the greatest living composers.

Short Ride in a Fast Machine:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDhRQDwTDJE

On the Transmigration of Souls:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6nrJ3ByzzE

For something a bit more traditional, my favorite Beethoven piano sonata is the "Pathetique," Op. 13
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FL0u9QXNvEg

Glenn Gould's performance is very good, even though you can hear him singing along every now and then... :lol:
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Midnight » Tue Feb 16, 2010 3:58 am UTC

my knowledge of classical has some breadth but very little depth.

I like rachmaninoff though.
uhhhh fuck.

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby achan1058 » Tue Feb 16, 2010 5:05 am UTC

grafpa wrote:Glenn Gould's performance is very good, even though you can hear him singing along every now and then... :lol:
The one reason why I hate Glenn Gould so much.

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby grafpa » Tue Feb 16, 2010 6:21 am UTC

achan1058 wrote:
grafpa wrote:Glenn Gould's performance is very good, even though you can hear him singing along every now and then... :lol:
The one reason why I hate Glenn Gould so much.


It gets obnoxious, but he is considered to be one of the best interpreters of Bach since recorded music. It's interesting watching videos of him - his posture was horrible.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Midnight » Thu Feb 18, 2010 12:30 am UTC

grafpa wrote:
achan1058 wrote:
grafpa wrote:Glenn Gould's performance is very good, even though you can hear him singing along every now and then... :lol:
The one reason why I hate Glenn Gould so much.


It gets obnoxious, but he is considered to be one of the best interpreters of Bach since recorded music. It's interesting watching videos of him - his posture was horrible.


you think that's bad... Keith Jarrett is pretty awesome. I dunno how well that video captures him grunting and whining over his playing, butif you look around for his stuff.. it's amusing.
uhhhh fuck.

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Antimatter Spork » Sat Feb 20, 2010 10:37 pm UTC

Oh cool a classical music thread. I think I'll post some modern stuff in it because modern stuff is the best.

Here's Penderecki's "Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima". In my opinion, it sounds exactly like what you'd expect the souls of nuclear bomb victims to sound like.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfBVYhyXU8o

Here's Anton Webern conducting Alban Berg's Violin Concerto (at least the beginning of it). Berg and Webern were two members of the Second Viennese School, arguably the most influential three composers in the twentieth century. The Violin Concerto is widely regarded as one of Berg's greatest work (if not his greatest).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTYAm0BXkxs

Here are some excerpts from Peter Maxwell-Daveis's "8 Songs for a Mad King".
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpDmQJCsipk

Here's the beginning of George Crumb's Electric String Quartet "Black Angels". If you're a university student at a school with a decent music department, your library probably owns the score to this. I highly recommend listening to it while following along with the score (or even just looking at the score), since I think that George Crumb's notations are works of art in their own right. That said, this piece is about the Vietnam war.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgr_w0-0caQ

That's all I've really got time for right now. I'll probably post some more stuff later.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby grafpa » Sun Feb 21, 2010 4:44 am UTC

Ooh Penderecki... nice.

There's lots of 20th century music that I enjoy, but my favorite are the late-Romantic and Impressionistic sounds. Stuff like Debussy and Scriabin and Ravel.

Least favorite music (besides the overdone crap they call "Country" nowadays) is stuff from the Baroque. I am deeply impressed by the complexity and genius of many of the works, but they're not much fun to listen to. In my opinion, I mean, and I could be totally wrong.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby etaoin » Sun Feb 21, 2010 8:00 am UTC

Bassoon wrote:Anything by Percy A. Grainger. Yes, all of it.


I haven't finished going through all of these, but I can confirm that everything by Percy Grainger appears to be fantastic. Also liked Mackey very much. I also re-listened to "Liebestraum" on your recommendation & thought it was beautiful. I had heard it before, but not really.

grafpa wrote:For something a bit more traditional, my favorite Beethoven piano sonata is the "Pathetique," Op. 13
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FL0u9QXNvEg
Glenn Gould's performance is very good, even though you can hear him singing along every now and then... :lol:


Yes, I love this piece & Gould's interpretation. Humming along... well, I find it sort of charming but I can see why people more serious about music might be annoyed by it. :P

Phill wrote:Also, Grieg's Wedding Day at Troldhaugen is beautiful. If I'd known about it when I got married I would have liked to have it played. Really joyful, bouncy tune.


Yes, it is great! The usual "here comes the bride" is Mendelssohn, right?

grafpa wrote:There's lots of 20th century music that I enjoy, but my favorite are the late-Romantic and Impressionistic sounds. Stuff like Debussy and Scriabin and Ravel.

Least favorite music (besides the overdone crap they call "Country" nowadays) is stuff from the Baroque. I am deeply impressed by the complexity and genius of many of the works, but they're not much fun to listen to. In my opinion, I mean, and I could be totally wrong.
http://www.qwantz.com/index.php?comic=1650


Love Ravel. Not just "Bolero" (which IS great, although he hated it). For example, there is his Toccata from "Le Tombeau de Couperin" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idfdk5nPs-s.

grafpa wrote:Least favorite music (besides the overdone crap they call "Country" nowadays) is stuff from the Baroque. I am deeply impressed by the complexity and genius of many of the works, but they're not much fun to listen to. In my opinion, I mean, and I could be totally wrong.
http://www.qwantz.com/index.php?comic=1650


I like that meme, lol.
Who are we talking about here? if you mean Bach, I'm not with you at all. You hear people say his music is too mathematical or something, but I can't see it. Now, Handel, Pergolesi, Purcell... yeah, ok, maybe they're a bit stiff. But Telemann, Lully, Bach? Love those guys.

Speaking of Telemann, I really like his Polish Concerto. Here is, e.g., the Allegro: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMe2okDYKgI

Anybody know what's worth listening to by Pachelbel besides the "Canon in D"?

Antimatter Spork wrote:Oh cool a classical music thread. I think I'll post some modern stuff in it because modern stuff is the best.
...
Here's Anton Webern conducting Alban Berg's Violin Concerto (at least the beginning of it). Berg and Webern were two members of the Second Viennese School, arguably the most influential three composers in the twentieth century. The Violin Concerto is widely regarded as one of Berg's greatest work (if not his greatest).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTYAm0BXkxs


Great, modern music! Keep it coming. I liked what you posted by Berg but... is there a reason that modern stuff seems to sound so em... dissonant?

Here's a version of Massenet's "Meditation" by Yo-Yo Ma, which I love: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtiIpIJ5J2Q. I guess he counts as somewhat modern.

A few reasons not to dismiss Bach (infidels!):
"Mache dich, mein Hertze, rein" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rTZ6Wreh2c
Prelude from Cello Suite 1 (overplayed, but still one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZn_VBgkPNY
"Jauchzet, frohlocket!" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AacsOk67T0s
"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" from B-Minor Mass http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1q6K2upeLnM
Brandenburg 5, mvt 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49IOKnhX0Sk
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby 1337geek » Sun Feb 21, 2010 2:18 pm UTC

etaoin wrote:Yes, it is great! The usual "here comes the bride" is Mendelssohn, right?

That'd be Wagner's "Bridal Chorus" from Lohengrin. Mendelssohn's famous "Wedding March" is often played as a recessional.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby achan1058 » Sun Feb 21, 2010 5:16 pm UTC

Speaking of Canon in D, it just reminds me of this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdxkVQy7QLM

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Antimatter Spork » Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:50 am UTC

etaoin wrote:Great, modern music! Keep it coming. I liked what you posted by Berg but... is there a reason that modern stuff seems to sound so em... dissonant?

It's a really long story, so if you don't really care maybe skip a paragraph or two or something. Don't worry, I'll tell you in all caps when I start posting music again.

Historically consonance and dissonance were defined in rather narrow terms. Certain intervals (going back to the early days of the Catholic liturgy, which is the oldest Western musical tradition that lasted into the age of recording, these intervals are simply the unison, octave and fifth) are designated as "consonant" and everything else is considered dissonant. These distinctions have some basis in the science of how sound works (in Western music, consonant sounds were those that minimized the beats that are caused by interference between waveforms at two different frequencies), but for the most part it's basically arbitrary where the line is drawn. This also imposes hierarchy onto intervals, as some consonances (the octave) were stronger than others (the fifth). Later (we're talking the late medieval and renaissance here, if I recall my music history correctly), the conception of "consonant" intervals expanded a bit, this time into two distinct categories (perfect and imperfect) consonances. The perfect consonances were the fifth and octave, and the imperfect consonances were thirds and sixths.

This thinking basically carried through to what we call the common practice era of tonal music (the one major change is that the fourth is considered a consonant interval in the common practice period, whereas in the renaissance it was a dissonance except in a couple very specifically defined exceptions. Already we see that there is not a clear dividing line and that everything depends on context).

So now we have the background, and we can begin to answer your question. Throughout most of the history of Western Concert music, there is a distinct tendency for each generation of composers to push the harmonic envelope, to use more "dissonant" sonorities in their music to build greater tension, and thus greater release when they cadence (this cycle of tension-release is at the core of all tonal music).

That said, notions of consonance and dissonance change over time. In general, the conventions relax as each new generation grows up hearing the conventional treatments of what was radical and new to their parents. What was once a subject to be treated carefully and resolved according to certain guidelines becomes something that can be done freely, subverted, or taken in unusual directions. Take seventh chords for example. In the Classical period, they were treated very carefully, the sevenths being introduced and resolving in certain patterns. Later music avoids and subverts these patterns without really seeming dissonant: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=io1o1Hwpo8Y
It's a jazz standard, which is a bit outside of the period I'm talking about here, but most people wouldn't really describe that music as "dissonant". That said, it uses tones that would have been considered dissonant by Mozart or Beethoven, and we perceive them as consonant due to our own conventions.

It is the general consensus of the music world that this trend towards increasing complexity and dissonance reached its apex in the work of Wagner. (Here's a famous example, the opening of Tristan and Isolde: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fktwPGCR7Yw).

After this point, composers started to abandon the conventions of tonal music. You have people like Debussy or Bartók writing things like this or this.

Now, finally, we come to the major player in this little drama: Arnold Schoenberg. Schoenberg was a composer and theorist who is probably one of the most (if not the most) significant figure in recent music history. Schoenberg wanted to equalize all of the tones of the scale. He set out deliberately (not in all of his works, but in most of his late ones) to eliminate the sense of pitch center, which existed even in the post-tonal works of composers like Debussy or Bartók. He also advocated the "liberation of the dissonance", which basically meant that he didn't want to treat "dissonant" intervals as any less important or worthwhile than consonant ones.

Needless to say, this was a pretty big deal. However, this concept was incredibly influential, and even in the works of composers who don't embrace Shoenberg's method (the 12-tone system with tone rows and all that stuff) are profoundly influenced by the idea that dissonant sonorities can be made to be just as important and feel just as stable as consonant ones.

Now this is an incredibly Germano-centric version of this story (Charles Ives, for example, was working with many of the same sort of sounds that Schoenberg would later "liberate" and treating them quite freely in America years before Schoenberg made his theories public, but the world of Western Concert Music is also incredibly germano-centric, and that's just how it is.)

IF YOU SKIPPED ALL THAT BORING STUFF HERE'S A GOOD TIME TO START READING AGAIN
Since we're talking about Schoenberg, here's his Friede auf Erden (peace on earth). I originally heard this piece performed in English, and it's incredibly powerful, especially if you can actually hear and understand the words. Unfortunately, the only youtubes I could find were in German and had the orchestral accompaniment with it (the piece is supposed to be acapella, but Schoenberg added an orchestral accompaniment after it turned out to be too difficult for most choirs to sing without orchestra. I highly recommend getting an acapella recording if you can though).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_mGY-bEAas

Not all modern music is dissonant! Here's the first "Knee Play" segment from Phillip Glass's opera "Einstein on the Beach". The opera itself is broken into four acts with knee play sections opening, closing, and separating each act.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jeEobpQMgD4

Minimalist music in general tends to use more consonant sonorities than serialist or other modernist music styles do. Personally, I think that the liberation of the dissonance is great in that it gives musicians options, but we should be as careful not to lock ourselves into only using atonal or serial procedures as we are to avoid limiting ourselves to traditional tonal procedures. Schoenberg showed us that tonality and consonance didn't need to limit our pitch-world just as Cage and other experimental composers showed us that traditional notions of what is or is not music don't need to limit what we do as musicians.

EDIT: I recently played Bach's first 'Cello suite on a recital (full disclosure: I am a bassist) and I think that the 'cello suites rank among the greatest achievements of humankind ever.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby MisterCheif » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:29 pm UTC

Bassoon wrote:I'm too much of a lazy ass to find youtube links, but I do have lots of recommendations:
Rimsky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade"
At any rate, I'm pretty sure at least half of them don't even have youtube videos. But that's my listing, I guess.


Here is a DCI arrangement of Scheherazade. It is quite good marching band music, my marching band played it last year.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby grafpa » Tue Feb 23, 2010 2:11 am UTC

etaoin wrote:Who are we talking about here? if you mean Bach, I'm not with you at all. You hear people say his music is too mathematical or something, but I can't see it. Now, Handel, Pergolesi, Purcell... yeah, ok, maybe they're a bit stiff. But Telemann, Lully, Bach? Love those guys.


As with anything, when you're talking about music, it is easy to make unfair generalizations. There is some amazing Baroque music, don't get me wrong - I just don't enjoy the majority of it. I suppose I've been jaded by two semesters of listening to harpsichord music that all sounds identical. Piano major and all...

EDIT: Great explanation, Antimatter. Couldn't have put it better.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Antimatter Spork » Tue Feb 23, 2010 3:18 am UTC

grafpa wrote:EDIT: Great explanation, Antimatter. Couldn't have put it better.

Hooray! My music degree is now not a waste since it qualifies me to post intelligently on at least one subject on an internet forum!

Youtube time!

Here's Henry Cowell's "The Aeolian Harp", a piano piece that pioneered the technique of playing inside the piano. It's a very cool piece, and Cowell's work is a landmark in that it launched a pretty significant era of American experimentation with new ways to use old instruments.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UsLA2Mz6PJ8

In a similar vein, here's an excerpt from George Crumb's "Eine Kleine Mitternachtmusik" (A little Midnight music). George Crumb is one of my favorite composers, and he really does very interesting stuff with every piece he writes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XJ4ivnH6A8

Continuing a pianistic theme, here's Aaron J. Kernis's piece "Superstar Etude No. 1", which is part of a fairly recent movement in classical music (Daugherty and Kernis are the two composers who really spring to mind here) that is extremely influenced by pop and rock music.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8npvHgJMMY

I really wanted to post Michael Daugherty's work "Le Tombeau de Liberace", but I couldn't find it on youtube. Oh well.

Leaving America, for a moment, here's an excerpt from Jacob Ter Veldhuis's (more commonly known as Jacob TV) piece "The Body of Your Dreams" which combines a performed piano part with a tape track.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3rhjM4HFnM
(Here are two more of Jacob TV's works, "Jesus is Coming" and "Grab It")
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MXKDCJkT_c
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kktLDRrvrS8 (warning! NSFW language in this one)

Ooh! I just found a couple pieces that I want to show off from my own instrument.

Here's Joelle Leandre's "Taxi" - the performer here is playing at a summer camp, it looks like, which explains why he censors some of the text (the parts he's saying in German and/or French reference wife-beating and other subjects inappropriate for performing for an audience of 10 year olds).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvfNuMI_Pgs

This one is called "Failing: A Very Difficult Piece for Contrabass". This performance is by legendary bass virtuoso Gary Karr.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpTK0ewlfiM

Here's another similar piece, Jon Deak's "B.B. Wolf, an apologia". I'm not going to describe it, but if you click one youtube link from this post, click this one.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xELBciNCQiw
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby grafpa » Tue Feb 23, 2010 7:07 pm UTC

Antimatter Spork wrote:Hooray! My music degree is now not a waste since it qualifies me to post intelligently on at least one subject on an internet forum!


I've been thinking the same about my degree... I'm graduating in May with a BM in Piano Performance... not much I can do with that unless I want to go to grad school, and even then...

On a happier note, my Arranging professor recently introduced me to Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings. It's incredibly beautiful.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lV3SHBFyDZM
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby mickyj300x » Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:46 pm UTC

All righty then, music you say?
For a start, one of my favourite composers, Alkan:
Sonatine, mvt 4
Sonate de Concert, mvt 4
Symphony for solo piano, finale
The most noticeable thing about most of his pieces is how stupidly difficult they are to play. But there's musical content beyond that, and I find it extremely enjoyable.
Prokofiev:
Piano concerto 2, mvt 3
This was one of the first modern pieces I ever heard and liked, so this deserves a mention.
Xenakis:
Synaphai, part 1
part 2
Possibly one of my favourite composers of the 20th century. Might not be to your taste, but oh well.

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Antimatter Spork » Wed Feb 24, 2010 2:46 am UTC

Barber is totally awesome.

Here's his Excursions for solo piano (one of my favorite pieces):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1L2Cn8ZFFzI

And here's the violin concerto (this is my all-time favorite violin concerto):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCj8Gg4h1Wk

The violin concerto has a really interesting story. It was commissioned by the wealthy family of a violin student (at Curtis Institute of Music, where Barber was also studying) as a showpiece. Barber took the advance, completed the first two movements, and showed them to the player. He complained that they weren't virtuosic enough, that they wouldn't show off his skill. Barber wrote the third movement as a (rather passive-aggressive, in my opinion) response to this criticism. When presented with the final movement, the violinist again complained, this time that it was unplayable, and he wanted the advance they had given Barber on the composition back. Barber, who had already spent the money, refused and asked another of the violinists at Curtis (who was known for his sightreading) to disprove the commissioner's accusation of unplayability by playing the concerto, which he did with only a few hours preparation. After that, Barber and the commissioner agreed to go their separate ways.

Anyway the concerto rules in every possible way and you should listen to all of it.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Smiling Hobo » Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:59 am UTC

mickyj300x wrote:All righty then, music you say?
Xenakis:
Synaphai, part 1
part 2
Possibly one of my favourite composers of the 20th century. Might not be to your taste, but oh well.

I actually liked that...a lot!

I have a new composer to check out, it would seem. :D
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby mickyj300x » Thu Feb 25, 2010 1:28 am UTC

Antimatter Spork wrote:Barber is totally awesome.

Here's his Excursions for solo piano (one of my favorite pieces):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1L2Cn8ZFFzI

And here's the violin concerto (this is my all-time favorite violin concerto):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCj8Gg4h1Wk

The Excursions are amazing. I've never listened to much Barber before.
This was the first Barber piece I ever heard.
And the third mvt of the violin concerto sounds like it was written on speed.

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Antimatter Spork » Thu Feb 25, 2010 1:58 am UTC

I'm not really familiar with the Barber piano sonata, but it seems pretty cool.

I think I prefer Barber when he's writing lyrically anyway. At least I always preferred the first movement of the violin concerto to the third.

Anyway, here's some Schoenberg:
This is Op. 11 no. 1, one of the first atonal pieces Schoenberg wrote. This was long before he developed the serial method, he uses other techniques to avoid tonality in this piece (though some people would argue that the piece is tonal in some ways. Personally, I can hear an extremely weak centricity on E in the first section, but I don't really think this piece can be described as tonal or centric overall.)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrjg3jzP2uI

This next piece is Arvo Pärt's "Spiegel im Spiegel". Pärt is a really interesting composer, he went through several compositional phases. The first was a modernist-serialist approach which was pretty typical of a lot of post-Schoenberg European composers. After that, he spent a lot of time studying early music (specifically the renaissance) and working a lot of those techniques into his style. His most recent period has been based around what he calls "tintinnabulation" and is a sort of minimalist style (that is minimalist but in a different way than the sort of minimalism we see in the states). His music is really interesting and beautiful, and he's one of my favorite composers.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtFPdBUl7XQ
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby ChocloManx » Thu Feb 25, 2010 2:40 am UTC

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby mickyj300x » Fri Feb 26, 2010 7:47 am UTC

This thread needs more Mahler love. I'll just post a couple of videos for now, as I'll let you find the rest for yourself.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKBGIRJa ... re=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvqkhbWz ... re=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnJ4n4PY9Vs

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby etaoin » Sat Mar 06, 2010 2:29 am UTC

Antimatter Spork wrote:It's a really long story, so if you don't really care maybe skip a paragraph or two or something.


That explanation was brilliant! I think I finally get it. I did rather suspect that it was a matter of modern music flouting conventions that I never knew existed in the first place. I guess you can't truly appreciate James Joyce without having read a little Melville (or something).

grafpa wrote:There is some amazing Baroque music, don't get me wrong - I just don't enjoy the majority of it. I suppose I've been jaded by two semesters of listening to harpsichord music that all sounds identical. Piano major and all...


Aha... all becomes clear. I can see why the harpsichord might grate on you seriously, in the fullness of time. :P

I am about to ravenously go through these other recommendations but I myself would like to give the old plug to the French composer Erik Satie. See here his Gymnopedie #1, with an odd little vaguely Amelie-style video to go along with it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Al5U1WJ48rM

Also the only piece of music by Handel I've found that I really love (haven't looked that hard though) is the aria "Dove sei" from Rodelinda. Here is some guy named Andreas Scholl singing it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8xjFUViTzo

I love you guys! *sniff* Keep it coming if you've the inclination.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby McCaber » Thu Mar 18, 2010 12:03 pm UTC

I'm a choral music man myself. Right off the bat: music never got better than Bach's St. Matthew's Passion. After that, we can throw in the Mass in B Minor, the Christmas cantatas, and maybe even the cello suites and Brandenburg concertos.

But seriously, Brahms' German Requiem is right up there too, along with Verdi's Requiem.

As far as modern choral stuff goes, Eric Whitacre is the man. His Lux Aurumque is one of the toughest pieces I ever sang, and one of the most rewarding. I have a soft spot in my heart for Z. Randall Stroope's Lamentations of Jeremiah, and I really enjoyed Bardos' Libera Me. But by far the trippiest thing I've done is Epitaph for Moonlight. Seriously, listen to my choir sing it. Freaking nuts.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Phill » Fri Mar 19, 2010 12:28 pm UTC

McCaber wrote:I'm a choral music man myself. Right off the bat: music never got better than Bach's St. Matthew's Passion. After that, we can throw in the Mass in B Minor, the Christmas cantatas, and maybe even the cello suites and Brandenburg concertos.

But seriously, Brahms' German Requiem is right up there too, along with Verdi's Requiem.


Ah, I love St Matthew's Passion as well. I heard the Christmas Oratorio a few years ago which was really good, and at my church they regularly (well, 2-3 times a year) do a service incorporating one of the cantatas. Got one coming up actually, on 28th they're doing 'Jesu Meine Freunde'.

Also I saw Verdi's Requiem last year - amazing.

My two favourites that I've heard live are Mozart's Requiem and Mendelssohn's Elijah. Particularly Elijah - I know it's kind of the pop music of the classical world, but I still love it!

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby JordanM » Sat Mar 20, 2010 5:10 am UTC

McCaber wrote:As far as modern choral stuff goes, Eric Whitacre is the man. His Lux Aurumque is one of the toughest pieces I ever sang, and one of the most rewarding.


I just sang Lux as part of Eric's "Virtual Choir".

To be released on Sunday! I can't wait for the next one, hopefully it's Nox Aurumque- he just put the full score on his site.

Antimatter, grats on the cello suite, from a fellow bassist. Check out Wilde's "Cellist of Sarajevo". Really interesting piece. And just for you:
Catalin Rotaru plays Paganini's Caprice 24 on bass

An orchestra I'm in is doing a Scandinavian special- two to check out are:
Sibelius Symphony No. 2
Nielsen Helios Overture

Also in the orchestra folder are:
Bach Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 (This is a local orchestra- my school music teacher was a violist with them)
Beethoven Symphony No. 4
Rimsky-Korsakov Capriccio Espagnol
Beethoven Egmont Overture

Current piano works in progress:
Glass Mad Rush
Bach Invention 1
Beethoven Bagatelle No. 1, Op. 119
Chopin Prelude in e minor

That pretty much sums up my spare time.

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby sircrayons » Sun Mar 21, 2010 5:04 am UTC

As another poster with a degree in music (theory/composition), I could seriously take up at least a page in this thread but I won't. It's not easy by any stretch of the imagination to pick favorites, but I'm going to throw two out there that I couldn't live without:

Beethoven's Symphony No. 7. The second movement is - hands down - the one piece that solidified my decision to study music. It is essentially a "theme and variations" based on an extraordinarily simple and beautiful ostinato.
Mozart's Requiem. The Lacrimosa, played at high volume on a good set of speakers/headphones, still (after maybe hundreds of listenings) gives me chills. Yes, that's right, I love to blast classical music at high volume. Sussmayr's completion is my favorite (Mozart died before he finished composing the piece), but I have not had the chance to listen to Robert Levin's attempt.

For something more modern, I'm a huge fan of Steve Reich, especially "Drumming." It's long but doesn't feel it, it's simple but doesn't sound it.

Finally, I can't go a discussion of classical music without mentioning P.D.Q. Bach, the 21st of J.S. Bach's 20 children. It's classical satire at its best.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby achan1058 » Sun Mar 21, 2010 10:30 pm UTC

sircrayons wrote:Yes, that's right, I love to blast classical music at high volume.
Same here, except I tend to blast Romantic and 20th century works. It's a sin to play the Rite of Spring softly.

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) controlled sonic assault

Postby miles01110 » Wed Mar 24, 2010 2:23 pm UTC

I've currently been listening to Strauss' Tod und Verkalung (which is sublime), but I'm afraid my tastes are fairly pedestrian.

Brahms Quintet for Clarinet and Strings in B Minor
Gershwin Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in F
Barber Knoxville: Summer of 1915
Brahms Symphonies
Beethoven Symphonies
Dvorak Symphonies
Schubert Sonata for Arpeggione
Mahler Symphony No. 4
Hindemith Symphonic Metamorphoses
Ravel Concerto for Piano in G
Brahms Requiem

...more I can't remember

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby Dave_Wise » Sun Apr 11, 2010 11:54 pm UTC

This: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLtJmOHRJIQ
It will tear your heart out.
Also, I have the perfectly complementary attributes of being, if there were no other option content to listen to nothing but Bach for the rest of my life and the ability to play the Bach 'cello suites, some of them off by heart.
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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby modularblues » Tue Apr 13, 2010 11:20 am UTC

Dvořák's and Elgar's cello concertos (Casals' or Rostropovich's or du Pré 's recordings)
Dvořák's Czech Suite
Dutilleux's flute Sonatine (E. Pahud/E. Le Sage recording)
Brahm's Piano Concerto #1

I heart Rachmaninoff's and Chopin's pieces.

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby JordanM » Sat Apr 17, 2010 3:44 am UTC

modularblues wrote:Dvořák's and Elgar's cello concertos (Casals' or Rostropovich's or du Pré 's recordings)


I have to say, I'm not fond of Rostropovich's recording at all- he seems to use a massive attack on his downbows, and it really gets me.

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Re: Concert (aka Classical) music

Postby achan1058 » Sat Apr 17, 2010 6:55 am UTC

JordanM wrote:
modularblues wrote:Dvořák's and Elgar's cello concertos (Casals' or Rostropovich's or du Pré 's recordings)


I have to say, I'm not fond of Rostropovich's recording at all- he seems to use a massive attack on his downbows, and it really gets me.
I can see that being a problem for some music. However, it would be perfect for playing Shostakovich.


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