Slang.

Things that don't belong anywhere else. (Check first).

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raike
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Re: Slang.

Postby raike » Tue Apr 24, 2012 5:35 pm UTC

Salty: I've heard it used to mean upsetting, irritating, displeasing, or (rarely) embarrassing.
I'm currently in Pittsburgh, but I've mostly heard people from Philadelphia saying it.
"When your work speaks for itself, don't interrupt." - H.J. Kaiser
رات دن گردش میں ہیں سات آسماں
ہو رہیگا کچھ نہ کچھ گھبرائیں کیا
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Dream
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Re: Slang.

Postby Dream » Tue Apr 24, 2012 6:28 pm UTC

So, it's going to rain in Ireland. It's going to rain a LOT. Steve Reich is composing a new national anthem up in here. What are some terms for serious rainfall where you are? We'll say it's lashing rain, or possibly that it's tipping down.
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roband
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Re: Slang.

Postby roband » Tue Apr 24, 2012 7:13 pm UTC

"pissing it down"

kinda related, does anyone else use "it's a bit fresh" to mean, "a bit cold"

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Re: Slang.

Postby suffer-cait » Wed Apr 25, 2012 5:53 am UTC

mayhaps wrote:Slang from Hawaii:
choke - many ("there are choke cars on the road" - "there's lots of traffic")
akamai - someone who's clever
da kine - refers to anything you can't remember the name for
beef - fight ("like beef?" - "you want to fight?")
lolo - idiot
shoots - okay, no problem


there's so much more...

I'd argue that akamai isn't slang, but a word in another language,
like how "broke da mouth" is slang, but ono is not (both meaning yummy, really tasty, etc)
ha'ole could be slang cause in hawaiian it doesn't mean white person, it means foreigner, directly it means "no breath"
same with manini, which is really a tiny fish, but is used to mean really small

let's see...

skosh: little bit
slippahs: sandals, specifically flip-flops or thongs
lick'ns (particularily dity ones): spanking or a beating
panty: pansy, chicken
scrap: fight
yeah, no: means yes
oogee: uncomfortable, creepy
talk story: to catch up with someone
irraz: iratating
b-52: big ass cockaroach
bolohead: bald
grindz: food
oof: to fuck, also puinsai
stinkeye: that glare of judgement kind of look people give.
buss: broken, drunk, beat up
old fut: old person. probably wrinkly
junk: no good (used in place of sucks: that's junk vs. that sucks)
garans (garans, ballbarans): gauranteed
bumbye: eventually, later
k'den: agreement, at the end of a conversation (i once saw the play where the lead was named Kaiden Aiseyu, or something)
cho cho lips: big plump lips, like angelina jolie
chicken skin: goose bumps
moke and titah are tough local guy and girl, respectively
ainokea: more of a mantra, follows: i do what i like. I don't care

we use "try" more often, like "try move"
same with stay: where you stay, we stay good, etc. means "are" sort of
a lot of our "slang" is just mangaled pronunciation and grammer

also, we throw "ah" at the end of sentences similar to the canadian "eh?"
and "but" at the end of the sentence instead of though, or putting it at the beginning
and "aisus", and "ai yah" are borrowed exclimations
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Apparently Anonymous
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Re: Slang.

Postby Apparently Anonymous » Wed Apr 25, 2012 11:36 am UTC

Some south africans I was hanging out with last summer would reply "oh, is it?" to pretty much everything. The odd thing about it is they didn't conjugate the verb to match with whatever it was referring to - for instance, a conversation could go like: "They had training already, at 4." "Oh, is it?" (instead of "oh, did they?" or something like that which would have made more sense to me)

Anybody know if this is common in South Africa or just among the group I was with?

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Gears
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Re: Slang.

Postby Gears » Wed Apr 25, 2012 1:11 pm UTC

I've heard from a south African that Afrikaans is like the Ebonics of Dutch, and they got lazy and only use one tense. I could be wrong though.
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TheAmazingRando
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Re: Slang.

Postby TheAmazingRando » Wed Apr 25, 2012 10:11 pm UTC

This thread makes me wish I didn't live in Southern California. Hollywood has already spread our slang throughout the world.

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Re: Slang.

Postby Igidich » Thu Apr 26, 2012 12:11 am UTC

Love the Hawaiian slang. Especially bolohead, and talk story. (And Dream's "Steve Reich is composing a new national anthem up in here", but sadly I suppose that only exists in his own personal idiolect.) Funnily enough, here in Scotland we use 'but' at the end of a sentence too: "I didnae see it but!"

One that I love from my childhood, which I think was a very local Glasgow thing but correct me if you've heard it elsewhere, was 'O-A!' for when someone did something naughty. I guess it translates as 'you're in trouble now!' The great thing about it is it has a sing-song quality; you sing 'O' a bit higher and go down a third for 'A'.

'Menshee' = graffiti tag.
'Grass' = tell on; 'I'll grass you up'
'Grassbag' = snitch
'Wide' = (covertly) insulting, sarcastic, or otherwise not showing respect; 'are you being wide wi me?'
Oh, and for those who loved 'fair enough', the Scottish is 'fair do's' (as in a plural noun derived from the verb 'do')

My flatmate in student accommodation was from Maidenhead, near London. He was a bit of a stoner, and he'd complain to me that he was 'cluckin for a smoke'. That's always been one of my favourites.

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Re: Slang.

Postby dubsola » Thu Apr 26, 2012 1:21 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:And that word is... Tump. Used as the word Tip, Knock, or even Dump may be used, but oddly enough almost always used in connection with either small, unsecured swing sets or beverages, and is seldom distant from the word Over. It even seems to specifically refer to the act of knocking an object off-balance by applying force to the top of the object, and not the center or base. So if you moved your arm and grazed the top of a glass and knocked it over, you tumped it, but if you moved your arm and swept the bottom of it, knocking it over.. you did not. Other usage being "Sally wasn't paying attention, and tumped the bucket of water over" or even "I think Johnny's too big for that swingset, that's the second time he's tumped it over today"

Funny thing about this, I read it, and then later that day was reading a book set in Nepal. The porters that wander over the mountains carrying things for you use a tumpline, which goes over the top of your head. So if your slang refers to knocking the top of something... that would perhaps indicate some relation to the term tumpline.

roband wrote:Hmm, maybe it's just a general "increaser". There's gotta be a word for that.

I have no idea.

Alder wrote:"Just now" is sufficiently common in Scotland that I wouldn't have specified it as slang! You mean folk don't say it elsewhere? :D

Yeah, I'm pretty sure this is universal.

Angua wrote:Do other people not use the term 'mash up' for smash something? Huh

Not heard the wine one - on my island (and also Dominica as I know someone from there) we say 'wok up(maybe wuk - not sure about spelling)

I've not come across 'mash up' elsewhere. And I've heard 'wuk' as well:
Mr Vegas - Hot Wuk wrote:girl say wine wid it, wine wid it, hot wuk wid it.


mayhaps wrote:Slang from Hawaii

I've heard 'malama' as in to take care (of something).

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Angua
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Re: Slang.

Postby Angua » Thu Apr 26, 2012 1:29 pm UTC

Oh, from that context I'd say he was saying 'wind' but it's written down in dialect so it's missing the d.

(also, maybe it wasn't 'just now', but somehting similar that my bf said he'd never heard anyone else say)
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dubsola
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Re: Slang.

Postby dubsola » Thu Apr 26, 2012 1:37 pm UTC

Angua wrote:Oh, from that context I'd say he was saying 'wind' but it's written down in dialect so it's missing the d.

Pretty sure wine = wind in the dialect.

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Angua
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Re: Slang.

Postby Angua » Thu Apr 26, 2012 1:39 pm UTC

I mean that it's the same word, but written how it would be pronounced. eg if someone started writing orse instead of horse because they were transcribing cockney.
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dubsola
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Re: Slang.

Postby dubsola » Fri Apr 27, 2012 7:44 am UTC

Ah yes, indeed.

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Dream
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Re: Slang.

Postby Dream » Mon Apr 30, 2012 10:36 am UTC

So, someone in another thread just used the word lamped to mean struck or hit. As in: "See your man with the Scanda jacket? He just lamped one of the bouncers. Got battered for his trouble." They say that where I come from, and I thought it was local. Do they say it anywhere else?
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roband
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Re: Slang.

Postby roband » Mon Apr 30, 2012 10:43 am UTC

It is known here in the Midlands of England.


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