Makeup 101

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Isotope_238
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Isotope_238 » Wed Feb 08, 2012 12:49 pm UTC

Virtual_Aardvark wrote:I'd put it up and then spray it actually. Gel is kindof gross and can fuck with your skin, I honestly haven't figured out who uses it beyond (aptly named) greasers. Alternately a light mousse could work.

Oops, I already have the gel. It's from a line of natural cosmetics, ingredients here (click on the gray tab that says Inhaltsstoffe, and the list is in sort-of English). So maybe it doesn't have weird scary skin-irritating ingredients? I can hope.

I'd be willing to buy mousse or hair spray from this brand; I like the other stuff I've gotten from them. Next question would be what's mousse--I was under the impression that it's pretty much the same thing as gel--and how do I use that?

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Shro » Wed Feb 08, 2012 5:49 pm UTC

Do you blow dry your hair after you wash it? How would you describe the texture of your hair: fine, medium, thick? How often does your hair get washed? The thing about gel is that you generally want to wash it out and not have it in your hair for very long periods of time. In your case, which I'm guessing is a lot like mine, you just want to use the gel to tame the occasional frizzies. I would apply the gel to the frizzies before you put your hair up.

Applying any kind of hair styling serum, gel, goop, creme, balm, whip or clay can generally follow the same process:
1)Take desired amount of product in hand
2)Rub hands, distributing product throughout.
3)Comb hands/fingers through hair.
4)Repeat if needed, concentrating on problem areas.

This way, since your hair is still down, you can get the product properly distributed through the area that has the frizzies. If you tried applying the gel while the hair was up, it might just gloop at the area of application. The reason I would avoid putting too much product in the rest of the hair in this case is because of the length of time between washes. Having hair product in your hair for too long can affect your skin as well, and breakouts are no fun. (Although with the natural ingredients and the fact that your hair is up, that shouldn't bother you too much).
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PictureSarah » Wed Feb 08, 2012 6:19 pm UTC

If I'm using mousse, I glob it onto my hands, rub them together, distribute through damp hair, and blow dry. Sometimes, I will put the applicator right at the roots in a few locations and squirt out a little glob, then massage it around. If I'm applying product to tame frizzies with my hair up, I actually do it after my hair is already up. I will put a little product (I use Organix "Styling Whip") on an old toothbrush, and apply it just to the frizzies. It works pretty well.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Isotope_238 » Fri Feb 10, 2012 12:08 pm UTC

Medium-thickness hair, and I wash 2 or 3 times a week, no blow-drying. I'm now living in a place with hard water, which is not doing my hair any favors. It feels somewhat sticky, less now that I've tracked down a drugstore and bought conditioner. It's also gotten somewhat wavy along the length, and it normally hangs straight all the way down. Weird, huh?

I've already discovered that at least with this gel, more than a sticky-fingertip's worth makes my hair glom together and impossible to brush. So I've been using a very small amount on a fingertip to control those same pesky strands that always try to get loose behind my ears and by the nape of my neck.

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby charlyjoness » Sat Feb 11, 2012 11:18 am UTC

Thanks for shared great tips about makeup...!!!That's really Interesting...!!

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby eaglewings51 » Sat Feb 11, 2012 8:17 pm UTC

Well, I'm not going to post pictures but this is what I do for makeup. You'll notice I exclusively use Mary Kay makeup. That's because my mom is a Mary Kay consultant so that's what I started using when I first started wearing makeup and doing skin care. Now, my mom gives me a discount. :D Plus, Mary Kay doesn't sell stuff in stores. They sell stuff through consultants and they really emphasize trying stuff before you buy it which sometimes, you can't do at stores.

Eyes: I have two main "looks" that I do. I do this look if I want to be wearing makeup but I don't want to wear much and I don't want the makeup to be as obvious. Like if I'm late to class or I'm going skiing or I'm visiting *certain* relatives that don't really aprove of makeup. So I want to wear makeup because I like the way it enhances my looks and I want to be me around them so I just go for a less-is-more look. I cover my entire eyelid (all the way down from my eyebrow) in Beach Blond cream eye shadow. It's a highlighter shade so it's not super noticeable but enhances my eyes and has a shimmer to it. Then, I use either Deep Brown eyeliner or I use Mary Kay's luxury liner (a liquid eyeliner) in Brown. Sometimes, I'll add a touch of a brown shade in the outside corner as a midtone or accent shade.

The other look is the one I wear the most and I LOVE. Once again, I cover my entire lid in Beach Blond. Then, I add Glacier Gray cream eye shadow in the outside corners (starting about 2/3 of the way across my eye) as a midtone. Now, sometimes I'll vary it. I'll add an accent color based on what I'm wearing sometimes. Just a hint of color: pink, purple, blue, brown, etc. I use Loose Eye Shadow in Pink Organza or Lilac Lace (light purple); Mineral Eye Color in Sweet Plum (dark purple), Denim Frost (blue), Amber Blaze (a copper/brown shade), or Lemon Grass (light green). Also, I will sometimes use the shades (light blue, light green, and light brown) from Mary Kay's Coastal Colors collection. Mostly though, I don't add a color in the corner because I like the way it looks without it. Then, I add either black or steely (a dark grey) eyeliner. I don't line my entire eye. I add a thin line along my entire upper lid (sometimes, again, if I'm visiting relatives, I'll only line about 1/4 to 1/3 of my upper lid from the outside corner). Then, I'll line a tiny bit of my lower lid. Just 1/4 to 1/3 from the outside corner of the lower lid. Depending on the day, I'll add Lash Love mascara in black. I always curl my lashes first. I wear mascara pretty much every day in the summer. In the winter, it depends. I go to college wear it's really cold: -20 down to -50 Farenheit for about 3 months in the winter. When it's that cold, I have to wear a scarf over my face when walking to class. That funnels my breath upward and it freezes on my lashes. Which means, once I get out of the cold, I pull the ice off my eye lashes as it melts. So I get mascara all over my hands when I do that. So when it's that cold, I don't wear mascara very often.

Mary Kay's cream eye shadow is AMAZING. I tried them while I was home for Christmas (awesome thing about a mom who's a consultant: she has all these samples and I get to try all the new stuff!) and fell in love. Now, I don't wear anything else except for accent colors. The shadow has primer mixed in so it doesn't really form a line in the crease at all.

I use Medium-Coverage cream foundation in Beige 300. Under that, I will occasionally use Mary Kay's Oil Mattifier. I have slightly oily skin so that helps keep my skin from becoming shiny throughout the day. Over that, I wear Sheer Mineral Pressed Powder in Beige 1. This helps absorb any oil and also helps keep my skin from appearing "flat" (for lack of a better term) after applying foundation. I use concealor in Ivory to cover any pimples or red spots. I used to wear blush on occasion but I don't very often anymore. Also, my blush broke the last time I was travelling and I never got around to getting another one. I don't break out very much but I do have a couple red spots from pimples that persist for weeks afterward. I use concealer every day to cover these and any other little marks I may have. I don't use foundation every day. Only when I really want to look nice. I love the way it makes my skin look: so even and smooth!

I also use TONS of skin care products. I use Mary Kay's Timewise 3-in-1 Cleanser and Timewise Moisturizer for combination/oily skin every evening. I also use Blemish Control Toner which helps keep the pores on my nose clear. I use Firming Eye Cream on my eyes. It helps firm the skin and reduce wrinkles and lines. I don't have to worry about that yet but it's always best to start early. I also use Replenishing Serum+C at night before using moisturizer. It has lots of vitamins and ingredients in it to just help keep your skin smooth and young-looking and healthy. I also occaisonally use Oil-Free Hydrating Gel which is extra moisturization. I usually only use it on my forehead and nose in the winter time. The winter air really dries out my skin.

EDIT: Ok, I decided to post pictures because I was bored. :mrgreen: I took pictures of every step but when I actually looked at them full size instead of just on the screen on my camera, they were all out of focus. :( Maybe next time.

Spoiler:
This is the second look I mentioned above completely done:

Image


Spoiler:
And here I am with my eyes closed so you can see the eyeshadow better:

Image

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KestrelLowing
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby KestrelLowing » Sat Feb 25, 2012 5:13 am UTC

Can I get some help? I'm really at a loss here for what to do for makeup.

Here I am without makeup:
Spoiler:
Image


And here I am with makeup:
Spoiler:
Image


Yup, there's not much difference there. And I also feel like I have makeup caked on!

First, I used neutrogena concealer (it comes almost like a lipstick) to take care of the worst acne. After that I used Aveeno tinted moisturizer. Then I put on neutrogena mineral sheers loose powder foundation. Finally, I put on neutrogena highlighting blush and covergirl lashblash fusion brown-black mascara. If I only use concealer and powder, I don't get any sort of coverage, and as I'm about to graduate college and still have that much acne (and this is a really good day!), I really need that extra coverage.

The worst part is, I believe I bought the lightest colors that they have for all of these things, but it still is too dark. And I apologize for the messy hair. I threw it up in a french braid this morning and that's what it looks like 12 hours later. Also please ignore the chapped lips. It's nearly impossible to live up here and not get really chapped lips in the winter.

So, does anyone have any suggestions? I'm trying to get it so I can actually look like an adult in the 'real world' while still looking like myself.

Edited to fix blatant errors
Last edited by KestrelLowing on Sat Feb 25, 2012 3:55 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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jillton
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby jillton » Sat Feb 25, 2012 11:01 am UTC

KestrelLowing - Make-up isn't about NOT looking like yourself, but enhancing the features that you already have!

If you don't want to go too caked-on I'd recommend Bobbi Brown moisturizey something or other. Bobbi Brown's theory with make-up is that it shouldn't look like you're wearing any. Again, enhancing your features not hiding them! And that particular foundation is lovely for skin, has spf and comes in really pale shades, I can't remember what my exact shade is but I'm paler than "porcelain" - didn't know that was possible.

From what you've written it sounds like you're not doing anything with your eyes/cheeks. Trust me, these will make a world of difference. Because I'm so pale I look ill if I don't have any blush on. I'm currently using the ends of "pearly queen" by Pout who now no longer exist. I also have a cream blush from Lancome but it's really old and not really as nice as it once was... I'd also recommend Benetint from Benefit (again Benefit is AMAZING for looking natural and the packaging is so pretty!) it's their liquid blush and can be used as a lip stain which is handy. It takes a few goes to get used to but it's really nice.

Eyes! You need some definition with them, this can be achieved with just a lick of mascara (I recommend Benefit "They're real"). I use white liner on my lower lids to make my eyes look a bit bigger, do a small line of black liner on the top lid, and then mascara. Do a little for day-time and a lot for night-time. Again you can go more dramatic with the liner for night-time too. And you can throw on some eye-shadow if you wish.

I hope this was in some way helpful!! But please don't use make-up to hide your lovely face!
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PM 2Ring » Sat Feb 25, 2012 1:17 pm UTC

jillton,
See KestrelLowing's post on the previous page for more info. Kestrel's in a very male-dominated profession (engineering), where it's hard enough for any woman to get taken seriously, but doubly so for a young woman who looks very young for her chronological age.


KestrelLowing,
Was any of my advice on the previous page helpful?

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby KestrelLowing » Sat Feb 25, 2012 2:39 pm UTC

jillton wrote:KestrelLowing - Make-up isn't about NOT looking like yourself, but enhancing the features that you already have!

If you don't want to go too caked-on I'd recommend Bobbi Brown moisturizey something or other. Bobbi Brown's theory with make-up is that it shouldn't look like you're wearing any. Again, enhancing your features not hiding them! And that particular foundation is lovely for skin, has spf and comes in really pale shades, I can't remember what my exact shade is but I'm paler than "porcelain" - didn't know that was possible.

From what you've written it sounds like you're not doing anything with your eyes/cheeks. Trust me, these will make a world of difference. Because I'm so pale I look ill if I don't have any blush on. I'm currently using the ends of "pearly queen" by Pout who now no longer exist. I also have a cream blush from Lancome but it's really old and not really as nice as it once was... I'd also recommend Benetint from Benefit (again Benefit is AMAZING for looking natural and the packaging is so pretty!) it's their liquid blush and can be used as a lip stain which is handy. It takes a few goes to get used to but it's really nice.

Eyes! You need some definition with them, this can be achieved with just a lick of mascara (I recommend Benefit "They're real"). I use white liner on my lower lids to make my eyes look a bit bigger, do a small line of black liner on the top lid, and then mascara. Do a little for day-time and a lot for night-time. Again you can go more dramatic with the liner for night-time too. And you can throw on some eye-shadow if you wish.

I hope this was in some way helpful!! But please don't use make-up to hide your lovely face!


Whoops! That was a horrible typo. I mean to say "while still looking like myself!" But PM 2Ring is right - I do need some manner of making myself look more mature and older. I do currently use a 'highlighting blush', and a brown-black mascara (if I go straight black, I feel like it's too much IMO)

PM 2Ring wrote:jillton,
See KestrelLowing's post on the previous page for more info. Kestrel's in a very male-dominated profession (engineering), where it's hard enough for any woman to get taken seriously, but doubly so for a young woman who looks very young for her chronological age.


KestrelLowing,
Was any of my advice on the previous page helpful?


I have been looking to change my wardrobe but dang is everything expensive! Still, I'm on the search for wardrobe 'classics'.
Also, I'm having a bit of an issue finding makeup that looks decent but would place me as a bit older (right now it all seems so 80s!) Also, if anyone had tips for how to change my hairstyle (I have had the same hairstyle since I was 4, just gradually getting longer and I really don't want to chop it because I really like the length (bra-strap)) that would be much appreciated.

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby jillton » Sat Feb 25, 2012 3:01 pm UTC

PM 2Ring wrote:jillton,
See KestrelLowing's post on the previous page for more info. Kestrel's in a very male-dominated profession (engineering), where it's hard enough for any woman to get taken seriously, but doubly so for a young woman who looks very young for her chronological age.


I was responding to the images she posted where she said she felt it didn't look like she was wearing make-up. I was just giving my own make-up tips.

I also look quite young for my age (my boss thought I was 16, I'm 24), unfortunately with me it's just my face shape and there's not much make-up can do about it. That's why I try not to cake on make-up as that's what teenagers do. Older women wear less make up, not more.

I also work in quite a male-dominated environment, again, why the make-up I wear day-to-day isn't heavy or "made-up" looking as you're less likely to be taken seriously if you look like you've piled on the make-up.

KestrelLowing - If you're really uncertain about make-up I'd suggest going to a make-up counter in a shopping centre and booking in a "lesson", I'd recommend somewhere like Clinique/Benefit/Bobbi Brown - these places have more natural looking make-up than somewhere like MAC which always scares me. Clinique also take into account your skin type etc so it's all good to your skin. It will be expensive but if you consider it as an investment becasue they'll show you what to do with the different products to make you look more mature but without looking "done".
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby meridian » Sat Feb 25, 2012 3:17 pm UTC

KestrelLowing wrote:So, does anyone have any suggestions? I'm trying to get it so I can actually look like an adult in the 'real world' while still looking like myself.


Is there a chance that the 'caked on makeup feel' is just plain the feel of makeup? I find that mineral powder foundations actually leave my pores a little itchy and it feels like I'm wearing makeup more so than when I'm wearing a moisturizer diluted liquid foundation. Powder just makes me feel made up. It could just be something you'll get used to over time.

As far as looking older, I would suggest staying away from pinks and avoid glitter/shimmer/gloss. Your face looked youthful and pinkish when you were done. That lovely pink shade is one of the things that fades with age, so hiding it might be your best way of making yourself look older without altering your appearance too much. Try a bronzer instead of blush and add some browns to your eyelids to mellow the shade there. Also, try to find a neutral lip color, maybe even something that's matte, that still matches your skin tone without being pink and girlish.

If you go to a mall near you with a good makeup counter, you might be able to get an associate to try some tones on your skin before you buy. Places like Sephora have a huge selection of samples to work with, so you can figure things out before you buy them. Don't feel you need to buy from them either. Just figure out what mellows your youth and then pick up a cheaper version elsewhere (unless you really love what they've put on you).
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby jillton » Sat Feb 25, 2012 7:30 pm UTC

Meridian you are bang on about Sephora!! We don't have it in Ireland which is heart-breaking, but overall it's the best place in the world for make-up! Felt like I finally understood the true meaning of "kid in a candystore" the first time I went there. Their own brand stuff is lovely and reasonably priced too.

In other news I spent about €30 on fake eyelashes and a new lipstick today. Oops!
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby RollingHead » Sun Feb 26, 2012 1:35 am UTC

I don't know how widespread it is outside of Italy, but Kiko is also a great place for makeup, the have a pretty wide selection and the people who work there are always very helpful, and it's not particularly expensive for a brand name.
I also have a question: what's the best way to remove eye makeup?

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby jillton » Sun Feb 26, 2012 3:44 am UTC

RollingHead - It depends what kind of make-up you're talking about.

For general every-day face wash/cleansing I use Cetaphil - It's available in almost every pharmacy in Ireland (as far as I know), it's about €14 a bottle but trust me it is so worth it. It's really good for sensitive skin - A friend of mine who is prone to eczema (spelling?) uses it on it's own with a cotton pad and finds it great for her skin which is really sensitive.

I use it every morning and night religiously as a face-wash, I just rub some on my face then splash on some hot water, moisturise afterwards and boom, you're good to go.

For mascara and eye-liner which are harder to remove, I put some Johnson's baby oil on a cotton pad and use that to remove eye-makeup. I do this first, and then wash any leftover makeup with the Cetaphil. If I have dark circles around my eyes left over after Cetaphil-ing I use more baby oil + cotton pad to remove excess. Works like a charm and has the same effect as any of the specific expensive "eye-makeup remover" lotions you may find at some makeup counters.

This is also a great pro-tip for doing make-up, if you blotch your eye-liner, just get an earbud (q-tip) and put some baby-oil on and use it to rub away any excess. The bonus is that it's good to your skin so it's not really harsh or anything.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PerchloricAcid » Sun Feb 26, 2012 2:57 pm UTC

KestrelLowing, have you considered bold-coloured lipsticks? I think dark red would look nice on your face. Take a look at this this random image I found for reference.
Also, consider mascara - but not black, rather something brownish. No need for this shimmery-glittery eye shadow though, if you ask me. Try some eye liner, brownish again, not black - it would enhance your dark eyes.

Hairstyle - I'd make the fringes shorter.

EDIT:
Just thought of this girl.

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby RollingHead » Sun Feb 26, 2012 11:54 pm UTC

Thanks a lot jillton, I'll see if I have any!

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Angua » Fri Mar 23, 2012 1:55 pm UTC

So, how do you do thick eyeliner without it looking really weird? I have eyeliner pen things (avon) so they do thin lines well, but looks weird if I do it thickly (though maybe it's because I'm not used to it - hard to tell). I feel like I've got a black eye or something, because it's not even enough if it's thick. Or should you use liquid eyeliner or something.

I"m basically trying to figure how I could pull this look off.
Spoiler:
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby meridian » Fri Mar 23, 2012 1:58 pm UTC

For my eye type, if I were attempting that look, I would use more mascara and eyeshadow than eyeliner. yes, use a thin line on the edge/waterline, then brush in a little dark shadow under the lashes, the apply mascara. (I may attempt this when I am at home and have such things at my disposal and take pictures.)
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Angua » Fri Mar 23, 2012 2:03 pm UTC

Thanks a lot! I knew I'd need some mascara, but I didn't consider it being the bulk of it. I'm not very good at this sort of thing.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby charolastra » Fri Mar 23, 2012 10:13 pm UTC

To fix the caked on feel - are you using brushes? If I use my fingers or put on concealer straight out of a tube, it looks cakey and the texture goes all wonky much faster. Brushes help blend and also make application smoother. Moisturizer and primer helps in those regards too.

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby meridian » Fri Mar 23, 2012 11:16 pm UTC

Okay, here's the breakdown of me attempting this look. I guess I'll go back in and edit some details if necessary, but I'm of the opinion that it speaks for itself.

Spoiler:
Photo 5.jpg
Blank canvas!

Spoiler:
Photo 6.jpg
Lined top lid only.

Spoiler:
Photo 7.jpg
Black eyeshadow on the waterlines.

Spoiler:
Photo 8.jpg
Brown eyeshadow on the lid and just below where I lined.

Spoiler:
Photo 9.jpg
The Shadow!

Spoiler:
Photo 10.jpg
Mascara.

Spoiler:
Photo 15.jpg
And a little lipstick.


(please be ignoring the blemish on my cheek. It grows more agitated during the photos and eventually received some ointment.)
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby poxic » Fri Mar 23, 2012 11:18 pm UTC

Not bad at all. I'd thin up the shadow lining the lower lid, but that might be just my taste in makeup.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Shro » Sat Mar 24, 2012 3:33 am UTC

I think the key is to make sure the line is thin, but to outline the entire eye (however, it could lead to your eyes looking smaller and close together). I'm also loaded up on mascara.
Before:
Spoiler:
before.jpg

After:
Spoiler:
after.jpg

After close up:
Spoiler:
after close up.jpg


The other alternative is using a brush to apply black eyeshadow at the base of the lid in place of eyeliner. This gives it that smudgy, smokey look.
Spoiler:
smokey eye.jpg

Spoiler:
smokey close up.jpg

You can kind of see that the line is decently thick, but isn't as solid. You can get this same effect by just smudging eyeliner. The reference photo model most likely also has a bit of extra pigment at the outside corner of the eye to make them look wider.
Edit: beeteedub I was a little drunk when I was doing all of this.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby netcrusher88 » Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:51 am UTC

PM 2Ring wrote:Beard cover.
There are various ways to hide beard shadow. The most effective beard cover products (eg Dermablend) work best with a fairly thick foundation. That may be ok for a glamourous evening makeup look, but they may be too heavy for a more casual daytime look, especially in the warmer months.
The old standby method is to use a cheap orange lipstick on the beard shadow. The orange neutralizes the bluish tinge that beard hairs impart to the skin. Cheap lipstick is preferred for this because more expensive lipsticks tend to contain moisturizers, which give the lipstick a thicker & richer look on the lips, but which aren't wanted for beard cover. You may need to experiment with different shades to find what works best for you.

What I understand, Dermablend comes highly recommended, but what I also understand, it's like paste. Anyway. Speaking of concealers, there's a thing called blue neutralizer (seems to be a generic term) which I am told is very good for hiding beard shadow. From what I've seen on the interwebs, it is basically the color of cheap orange lipstick. Oddly enough. :wink:

Since the subject's been touched on, how do you make blow drying hair not suck? Other than less hair. The last few times I've gotten bored and given up and wound up with a less straight, less controllable mess.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Angua » Sat Mar 24, 2012 9:48 am UTC

Wow, guys - I didn't even know you could use eyeshadow like that! What does the waterline mean?

Also, you both look great!
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby meridian » Sat Mar 24, 2012 1:45 pm UTC

When lining your eyes, you have two surfaces to work with. The lash line is what is usually lined as that's less irritating. It's the line of lashes above and below the eye. When you line this, you can see the stretch of skin between what you've lined and your eyeball. That's your water line. In order to line it, you pull it away from your eye and apply the liner it shorter strokes. (I use a brush.) It's a bit more irritating as your eye's natural defenses kick in with a foreign object so near the eye.

Yes, it does make an eye look smaller. yeah, if your hand slips and you poke your eye, you'll start crying and mess up your makeup. It's a pain, but it's a surface you can line that gives you the appearance of eyeliner without thick lines surrounding your eye. It can also be lined to hide puffiness from sleep deprivation.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Angua » Sat Mar 24, 2012 1:57 pm UTC

Cool, thanks.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Angua » Tue Mar 27, 2012 9:38 am UTC

I just wanted to say thank you for the help. I'd post pictures of my first attempt, but for some reason I can't get attachments to work.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PerchloricAcid » Fri Mar 30, 2012 11:36 pm UTC


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Re: Makeup 101

Postby paulisa » Sat Mar 31, 2012 8:15 am UTC

Re: eyeliner on the waterline

I can do eyeliner on the waterline of the bottom lid just fine, but the waterline doesn't go right to the inner corner so I tend to not line that part. I think it doesn't look too bad that way.
What I just cannot manage is doing anything to the waterline of my top lid. I can't hold the lid properly to line it, and if I try to line the lid instead of the waterline it just looks weird. Any tips?
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PerchloricAcid » Sun Apr 01, 2012 3:06 pm UTC

Why can't you hold the lid properly?
Try pulling your eyelid by touching it at it's upper part, right under your eyebrows. That's how I do it.

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby charolastra » Sun Apr 01, 2012 4:17 pm UTC

I also make sure to have my elbow firmly on a table or countertop while lining the water line. It helps my hand to be not so shakey - focus on small movements. Haven't poked myself in the eye, had watery eyes, anything since I started using eyeliner about 10 years ago.

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PerchloricAcid » Mon Apr 16, 2012 6:34 pm UTC

Anyone done green hair?
Something like this:
Spoiler:
Image


I've got brown hair. I don't want to bleach it. I think I don't want my whole hair to be green, just parts of it. I've even considered a wig, but I can't seem to find a nice, green wig at all (not to mention reasonable prices).
There's also this diy green colour thing: http://www.ehow.com/how_4841062_green-hair-dye.html

What do you people think?
Would it even be possible?

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Re: Makeup 101

Postby NovaNatalia » Fri May 25, 2012 7:18 am UTC

I've a question about fingernails (I do hope it's alright to put it in this thread) — I've noticed in a lot of pictures and in real life, the ends of fingernails are pure white. However, mine are a dull, translucent grey. I originally thought that it may be a clean fingernails thing, but after being very careful to clean them out perfectly, they’re still the horrible colour. My other thought was that maybe it’s a transition thing, in the region after it comes off the finger but before it goes all the way off, but no woman I’ve seen has this transition, it just goes from the straight pink (from being able to see through to the flesh beneath it) to the solid white. Am I doing something wrong?
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Angua » Fri May 25, 2012 7:52 am UTC

Mine are whitish/greyish/yellowish, and a bit translucent. You are probably looking at pictures of people with a 'French manicure' though.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby meridian » Fri May 25, 2012 12:24 pm UTC

Some people also whiten their fingernail tips with pencils like this one. I don't like the feeling of things under my nails and clean them often (several times a day), so this doesn't work for me, but it's easier than a french manicure.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby NovaNatalia » Sat May 26, 2012 5:21 am UTC

Thank you! It's nice to know that it's not me doing something wrong.
I do have more questions about nailcare, though — it was suggested to me that a clear varnish helps 'strenghen' then nails (whther it actually strengthens the nail or simply provides structural reinforcement wasn't made clear to me), but a cheap one could weaken it. Is this true? If so, what's the divide between cheap and reasonable (i.e. what are reputable brands)?

Also, I read some stuff about pushing one's cuticles ... what's the point of this?
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Cathy » Sat May 26, 2012 5:46 am UTC

I personally knock nail polish off my fingers very very quickly doing normal things, so even several layers of clear doesn't last long. For people whose nails are thin and break easily, I suppose it could help the thickness and sturdiness of their nails. However, beware! My mother has thin nails and is so sensitive that if she has nail polish applied to her fingernails her nails hurt for a week. I'll leave the brand quality to others as I have no idea.

I'm pretty sure that pushing cuticles is personal preference. I like doing it on my toenails because they tend to dry out and get stiff and cracked and then damage the skin farther back if they crack too much.

As to white nails and stuff... I'm pretty sure that's fotoshop by adobay.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby bluebambue » Sat May 26, 2012 5:10 pm UTC

natashatasha wrote:Thank you! It's nice to know that it's not me doing something wrong.
I do have more questions about nailcare, though — it was suggested to me that a clear varnish helps 'strenghen' then nails (whther it actually strengthens the nail or simply provides structural reinforcement wasn't made clear to me), but a cheap one could weaken it. Is this true? If so, what's the divide between cheap and reasonable (i.e. what are reputable brands)?

Also, I read some stuff about pushing one's cuticles ... what's the point of this?

My mom has weak nails. She has found that clear varnish helps strengthen/provide structural reinforcement, but that using nail polish remover makes her nails worse than before. YMMV

Cuticles are ugly according to society. I have heard that doing anything to ones cuticles is not good for the nails, so I don't do it.


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