Search found 911 matches

by goofy
Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:45 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

gmalivuk wrote:Bible translation into something Polynesian.


Very close. I'll give you it if no one else gets closer. It's actually not Polynesian, it's from a point higher up on the family tree.
by goofy
Tue Mar 12, 2013 1:19 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Iesu mo mele vano mo hahau na pahisa tasin Galilee. Mo sahe aulu na vutivuti, ale mo lo sakele ea. Moiso vao tavera mo mar̃ivi la mai isana peresi na tamlohi hariju, matavuso, tamlohi papao, la haratu la mengo, ale vao matuvana tinapua, ale la taura na palona, moiso mo vai mamahunira, ale vao atu r...
by goofy
Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:44 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Hadd m'ghandu jkollu ghal xejn b'xejn indhil fil-hajja privata tieghu, fil-familja tieghu, f'daru jew fl-ittri tieghu, u lanqas m'ghandu jbati minn attakki fuq l-unur u l-fama tieghu. Kulhadd ghandu l-jedd għall-protezzjoni mil-liġi kontra kull indħil jew attakki bħal dawn. The diacritics, and what...
by goofy
Mon Mar 11, 2013 6:36 pm UTC
Forum: What If?
Topic: What-if 0008: "Everybody Jump"
Replies: 155
Views: 45511

Re: What-if 0008: Everybody Jump

Being a longtime xkcd lurker and native Hindi speaker, I had to register after seeing the Hindi text. The text reads "hawai adde kahan hain" (nasal N's at the end of the last two words) and means "Where are the airports?" Why Randall chose to have the man say that as opposed to ...
by goofy
Mon Mar 11, 2013 4:25 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

That reminds me of Hittite or Luvian, but the Hittite and Luvian I've seen has more capital letters and no carets.
by goofy
Mon Mar 11, 2013 2:17 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Kurdish? No. You're in the wrong area. Chromatos might have an idea. Maldivian? It sort of reminds me of Sinhalese (well, not entirely, but it has a sort of Dravidian feel to it), but it looks to have a lot of Arabic loans in it, so I'd guess it's whatever's spoken in the Maldives. Yes! Well done.
by goofy
Sun Mar 10, 2013 5:55 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Derek wrote:Kurdish?


No. You're in the wrong area. Chromatos might have an idea.
by goofy
Sun Mar 10, 2013 5:30 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Alexius wrote:For Goofy's Indo-European language, I don't think it is Farsi. It is probably Indo-Iranian though as:


It is Indo-Iranian, but it's not Persian/Farsi.
by goofy
Sat Mar 09, 2013 7:56 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Hint: it's Indo-European
by goofy
Sat Mar 09, 2013 3:13 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nominalization
Replies: 9
Views: 3333

Re: Nominalization

Envelope Generator wrote:What's the fuss? Some of the examples involve bad style, but the principle itself looks no different from what happens routinely in synthetic languages.


Forming nouns from "other parts of speech" is really common in English too: writer, academic, human being.
by goofy
Sat Mar 09, 2013 5:09 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nominalization
Replies: 9
Views: 3333

Re: Nominalization

by goofy
Wed Mar 06, 2013 11:19 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Here's one. This is a romanization: al'la'ufedhey qaanoonu asaaseege himaayaïlibigen siyaaseepaateetha' hingeynegoïtha' hamajehifaïneïnama e'qaanoonuge misaalakee alifaanroavej'jenama salaamaïvaane sidie'neï ethake'bureege imaaraathe'ge misaaleve. Hmm- it looks like Somali to me, especially with th...
by goofy
Wed Mar 06, 2013 3:48 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Here's one. This is a romanization:

al'la'ufedhey qaanoonu asaaseege himaayaïlibigen siyaaseepaateetha' hingeynegoïtha' hamajehifaïneïnama e'qaanoonuge misaalakee alifaanroavej'jenama salaamaïvaane sidie'neï ethake'bureege imaaraathe'ge misaaleve.
by goofy
Wed Mar 06, 2013 2:52 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

The Mighty Thesaurus wrote:Try this:
Ngkungur ile Godowe enggun winmir, wyirrewarre, ruwe. Tarno nunkeri ruwe, pek ellin ityan ruwe; maratulde ellin ityan ruwe. Yonguldye bahrekangk. Pangari Godald yelkulun itye bahrekangk.


Australian, but I can't be more specific.
by goofy
Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:55 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Facebook via me
Replies: 18
Views: 8409

Re: Facebook via me

How do we know which definition is less common? The fact it's given as the second sense. No, that just means it's newer. "By means of" means "by the use of". To me, "From Betty by means of Adam" still means that Betty sent a message and used Adam to get it to you, rath...
by goofy
Sat Mar 02, 2013 6:04 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Facebook via me
Replies: 18
Views: 8409

Re: Facebook via me

Isn't that still saying that Betty/advertising is the originator and Adam/screen the intermediary? No, because it's not about travel. The earlier meaning was about travel, but the newer meaning has nothing to do with travel or who is in between who. It just means "by means of". it was sen...
by goofy
Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:09 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Facebook via me
Replies: 18
Views: 8409

Re: Facebook via me

How do we know which definition is less common?

I interpret facebook messages like "Betty via Adam" in the sense they were intended. It doesn't seem weird to me.
by goofy
Fri Mar 01, 2013 10:57 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Facebook via me
Replies: 18
Views: 8409

Re: Facebook via me

Sense 2 of via in the OED is "By means of, with the aid of". So Betty via Adam makes sense: from Betty by means of Adam, with the aid of Adam. I guess this is an extension of the usage "by means of" or "through the medium of" in contexts not having to do with travel, fo...
by goofy
Fri Mar 01, 2013 4:00 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Sir Novelty Fashion wrote:...


Now you're just making stuff up.

Well done, the Faction is proud of you.
by goofy
Wed Feb 20, 2013 12:38 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Annoying words, and Words You Hate
Replies: 1951
Views: 415543

Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

In Merriam-Webster, it's labeled "nonstandard". The same as irregardless . Words like conversate and irregardless get put in dictionaries so that, when people use them, other people might be able to know what the fuck they're talking about. That's one reason words get in dictionaries. Ano...
by goofy
Wed Feb 20, 2013 12:20 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Annoying words, and Words You Hate
Replies: 1951
Views: 415543

Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

UniqueScreenname wrote:It's in the dictionary? How did that happen? It's not a word.


conversate certainly is a word. I understand it, I've heard it used. It is in some dictionaries, for instance Merriam-Webster.
by goofy
Tue Feb 19, 2013 3:14 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Chromatos wrote:I didn't see that earlier one until now, and it's definitely one of the Dravidian languages. Telugu or Kannada would be my guess.


Close enough! It's Telugu.
by goofy
Mon Feb 18, 2013 5:01 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Chromatos wrote:Looks like a very primitive Brahmic script.


Correct. Can anyone be more specific? I posted a few more earlier in the thread as well.
by goofy
Mon Feb 18, 2013 2:40 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Here's another one: name the script.
by goofy
Mon Feb 18, 2013 1:15 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Here is my entry.

And:

Gi'gii pii'igo ji'bidagoshi'nan
by goofy
Sun Feb 17, 2013 10:22 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

Spoiler:
I'm confused. Is Griko normally written in the Roman alphabet?


Visi žmonės gimsta laisvi ir lygūs savo orumu ir teisėmis. Jiems suteiktas protas ir sąžinė ir jie turi elgtis vienas kito atžvilgiu kaip broliai.


Lithuanian.
by goofy
Sun Feb 17, 2013 6:45 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 114866

Re: Obscure Language Game

I'm saying the second is Cornish because of the k's.
Spoilers:

Spoiler:
If the third is some kind of Greek, then what Greek letter does "c" represent?
by goofy
Wed Feb 06, 2013 3:20 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: You keep using that word...
Replies: 39
Views: 12582

Re: You keep using that word...

Indy wrote:Infer.


The truth about infer is much more complicated than most people think.
by goofy
Fri Feb 01, 2013 3:25 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Begging the Question
Replies: 19
Views: 9931

Re: Begging the Question

Carlington wrote:Fair enough, I can understand that. I'm a little shaky on when exactly prescriptivism has been a thing, to be honest, so thanks for helping me clear that up.


The rise of English prescriptivism
by goofy
Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:09 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Begging the Question
Replies: 19
Views: 9931

Re: Begging the Question

Liberman on begging the question Prescriptivism says, basically, that language is the way it is, and should be a certain way. To a prescriptivist, the only valid definitions of words and phrases are to be found in a dictionary, and grammar is a set of rules to be followed. They prescribe meaning to...
by goofy
Mon Dec 24, 2012 6:52 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Annoying words, and Words You Hate
Replies: 1951
Views: 415543

Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Impregnable There's actually no relation between impregnable and impregnate . The first is borrowed from French imprenable , with the negative in- prefix plus prenable "able to be taken". The second is borrowed from Latin impraegnāre "to make pregnant", with the in- prefix meani...
by goofy
Mon Dec 10, 2012 5:55 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Lying: Relative or Absolute?/Stool or No Stool?
Replies: 11
Views: 5228

Re: Lying: Relative or Absolute?/Stool or No Stool?

Carlington wrote:Is it willed into existence by your very act of believing it's there?


Of course not, that's ridiculous.
by goofy
Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:11 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: You keep using that word...
Replies: 39
Views: 12582

Re: You keep using that word...

Izawwlgood wrote:Factoid and nonplussed are two words I routinely hear people misuse, although the meaning of factoid has changed.


nonplussed
by goofy
Mon Oct 22, 2012 9:00 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: One sentence in the languages you know
Replies: 37
Views: 12139

Re: One sentence in the languages you know

adam01 wrote:Kannada

Neevoo Germanigay Yavaga Bharteera?

and I'd have to update my fonts (ugh) to do the squiddlies for ya


ನೀವು ಜರ್ಮನಿಗೆ ಯಾವಾಗ ಭರತೆರ

How many mistakes did I make?
by goofy
Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:05 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Person/Persons/People
Replies: 11
Views: 3790

Re: Person/Persons/People

I confess I don't quite understand the AHD usage note. Of course people has a singular form: person . What exactly do they mean by "corresponding"? Maybe they mean people has no etymological singular form? However, I'm not yet satisfied that these examples establish "people" to b...
by goofy
Sun Oct 21, 2012 3:16 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Person/Persons/People
Replies: 11
Views: 3790

Re: Person/Persons/People

People has been used as a plural of person for about 700 years. Could you point to some examples? The 1913 Webster's Unabridged Dictionary doesn't even mention the word "people" in its entry for "person", which seems to suggest that the confusion between "people" and &...
by goofy
Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:56 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Person/Persons/People
Replies: 11
Views: 3790

Re: Person/Persons/People

My take: "Persons" is the correct plural of all senses of the word "person". Really? I don't think you'll find many modern usage commentators who will agree with you. There was a dispute about this in the early 1900s, but I think most people today agree that people is a plural o...
by goofy
Fri Sep 28, 2012 4:45 pm UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 1108: "Cautionary Ghost"
Replies: 155
Views: 27235

Re: 1108: "Cautionary Ghost"

I'd agree with the assertion that it's used for more than one purpose, but not that it's understood. That's what people say, but I haven't seen any actual evidence that there is any confusion. Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage has 10 citations of literally as a figurative intensifier, t...
by goofy
Fri Sep 28, 2012 1:13 pm UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 1108: "Cautionary Ghost"
Replies: 155
Views: 27235

Re: 1108: "Cautionary Ghost"

Well okay, technically you're correct. It's more like the opposite: 'figuratively' means 'not literally'. But the point stands. 'Literally' has one useful purpose, and that is to clarify whether something actually happened or not, when the situation seems like it might be hyperbolic. That's the onl...
by goofy
Fri Sep 28, 2012 12:42 pm UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 1108: "Cautionary Ghost"
Replies: 155
Views: 27235

Re: 1108: "Cautionary Ghost"

All language is figurative to some extent. Why is literally the only word we're not supposed to use figuratively? Because literally means 'not figuratively'. No, literally means "by the letter". The "not figuratively" meaning is a figurative extension. All language is figurative...

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